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Vigilante Justice

OPINION
January 23, 1994
I find it incomprehensible that jurors possessed of IQs above room temperature can believe that Erik would confess the killings to a therapist and not at the same time blurt out the alleged child abuse which drove him to homicide (Jan. 14). Of course this hardly explains why he also decided to kill the eyewitness while he was at it. She happened to be his mother. The real tragedy is not that the taxpayers have been soaked for yet another farce of a trial or even that another killer may someday go free.
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OPINION
January 16, 1994 | SUSAN ESTRICH, Susan Estrich, a contributing editor to Opinion, is a law professor at USC. She served as campaign manager for Michael S. Dukakis in 1988
This was the week that privates upstaged a President. While President Bill Clinton was in Europe restructuring the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, seeking agree ment from Ukraine on nuclear weapons and meeting with Boris N. Yeltsin, millions of Americans, along with CNN viewers around the world, tuned in to nonstop coverage of Lorena Bobbitt's trial for assault on her husband.
NEWS
May 17, 1993 | S.J. DIAMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What began in tragedy is sinking in sentiment. Spaghetti suppers around Jamestown, Calif., are raising money for the defense of Ellie Nesler, the little mining town's vigilante heroine. Total strangers send checks. Nesler's sister has appeared before the California Legislature to testify on a bill increasing penalties for child molestation, specifically because of "the recent incident in Jamestown." But beyond the photo ops, the original dilemma remains: Does provocation justify a crime?
NEWS
April 30, 1992 | Richard Crawford, Richard Crawford is archivist for the San Diego Historical Society.
California had little trouble executing its condemned murderers in the late 1800s--a violent period in San Diego history, particularly in rural and isolated North County areas. After brief trials, most convicted slayers from San Diego were hanged on the grounds of the county courthouse. Appeals and stays of execution were rare. (After 1893, the condemned from all counties were executed at San Quentin.
NEWS
July 29, 1990
For 15 years during the middle of the 19th Century, El Monte was the only village between Los Angeles and San Bernardino. It was known for rough manners and vigilante justice. Nicknames for the town included "Hell's Half-Acre," "Lickskillet" and "Shirttail Bend."
NEWS
June 29, 1990 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Horacio Santos, a 42-year-old nuclear engineer, had already been robbed 13 or 14 times, his family and friends say. When it happened yet again, he cracked--and a national uproar ensued. At about 11 a.m. on June 16, Santos heard his car alarm go off while he was shopping near his home. He ran into the street to find two men stealing his car stereo. As they fled in an old Chevrolet, Santos leaped into his Renault Fuego and gave chase. A few blocks away, he overtook and halted the thieves.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1988
Despite the protest of one supervisor that it smacked of "vigilante" justice, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors agreed Tuesday to seek state legislation that would encourage "community surveillance" of registered sex offenders. The proposal, by Supervisor Pete Schabarum, would establish a statewide reward fund for citizens who identify and report sex offenders violating probation or parole requirements that require them to register with law enforcement.
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