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Viisha Sedlak

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MAGAZINE
June 13, 1993 | DORIS A. FULLER, Doris A. Fuller, a former Times staff writer who now lives and racewalks in Summit County, Colo., is a frequent contributor to the business section.
The sport of walking is like a nest of embellished boxes, each one more intricate than the last. The largest box is fitness walking, or power walking, or striding--moving with a normal gait at a faster-than-normal speed for a specified period several times a week. More than 31 million Americans are making power walking the nation's biggest fitness sport. Open this box and find the racewalkers.
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MAGAZINE
June 13, 1993 | DORIS A. FULLER, Doris A. Fuller, a former Times staff writer who now lives and racewalks in Summit County, Colo., is a frequent contributor to the business section.
The sport of walking is like a nest of embellished boxes, each one more intricate than the last. The largest box is fitness walking, or power walking, or striding--moving with a normal gait at a faster-than-normal speed for a specified period several times a week. More than 31 million Americans are making power walking the nation's biggest fitness sport. Open this box and find the racewalkers.
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SPORTS
November 1, 1987 | BERT ROSENTHAL, Associated Press
In 10 years, Viisha Sedlak, a former Wilhemina model, has gone from being unable to run a quarter-mile to an ultra-distance runner to a world-class racewalker. Now she's campaigning to make her sport more widely known and, hopefully, get it recognized as an Olympic event. Sedlak, a 6-foot, 127 pounds natural athlete, did not begin her running career until 1979, when she was living in Honolulu. "I was getting cellulite and mushy," she said. "I had quit modeling and had just opened a business.
MAGAZINE
July 25, 1993
After reading Marlowe Hood's article on the harrowing experience of desperate Chinese refugees ("Dark Passage," June 13), one can only conclude that a re-examination of our immigration policies is in order. These people have given up everything and risked their lives and health to travel to an unknown land just for a chance to make a better life for themselves and their children. That's what my ancestors did. If the new arrivals are lucky enough to get a job, they work harder and save more than seems humanly possible, and they generally behave the way Americans expect each other to behave.
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