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Viktor Alksnis

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NEWS
January 28, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The leader of the major conservative faction in the Soviet legislature said the recent violent events in the Baltic republics will likely lead to civil war, the country's biggest newspaper reported Sunday. Col. Viktor Alksnis, the head of Soyuz, or Union, said the Soviet army could split or stop obeying the Kremlin and take power by force unless President Mikhail S. Gorbachev cracks down on the rebellious republics.
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NEWS
January 28, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The leader of the major conservative faction in the Soviet legislature said the recent violent events in the Baltic republics will likely lead to civil war, the country's biggest newspaper reported Sunday. Col. Viktor Alksnis, the head of Soyuz, or Union, said the Soviet army could split or stop obeying the Kremlin and take power by force unless President Mikhail S. Gorbachev cracks down on the rebellious republics.
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WORLD
May 6, 2005 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
Authorities have recovered a cache of poisons and a truck loaded with explosives they believe were intended for use in terrorist attacks during a visit here next week by President Bush and more than 50 other world leaders, police said Thursday. Maj. Gen.
NEWS
March 18, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This is where the road to nowhere ended Tuesday, an industrial pothole of a town that hosted one of the strangest wild-goose chases that Russian politics has ever seen.
NEWS
August 23, 1991 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his three days of imprisonment at his dacha in the Crimea, Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev was supposed to be totally isolated. Phone lines and electricity were cut. "Everything was down," Gorbachev said at his first press conference Thursday. But Gorbachev and a group of still-loyal guards were able to keep up on the events that defeated the coup by resorting to an old tool of the Cold War--international shortwave radio, particularly the British Broadcasting Corp.'
NEWS
September 11, 1992 | TERESA WATANABE and JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
One day after Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin abruptly canceled his impending visit to Japan, Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa and other officials scrambled Thursday to put the best face on the diplomatic debacle, while public opinion was split over whom to blame. Miyazawa urged his country to "wait patiently" for Russia to sort out its domestic problems, while Foreign Minister Michio Watanabe urged people to "keep a cool head" and not respond in an "exaggerated way."
NEWS
November 22, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The right wing in the Soviet Parliament issued an ultimatum to President Mikhail S. Gorbachev on Wednesday: Halt the country's drift toward "civil war" within 30 days or face a formal demand from conservatives to resign. "In all countries and systems, leaders who fail to achieve promised results--let alone those who actually worsen the situation--are replaced," said Col. Viktor Alksnis, a member of the Congress of People's Deputies. "It's time we follow this global rule. . . .
NEWS
February 17, 1990 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Another crack appeared in the once unified face of the Soviet Communist Party here Friday when a group of deputies representing almost 20% of the Supreme Soviet, or Parliament, announced they had banded together to fight what they described as nationalist threats to the integrity of the country.
OPINION
November 17, 1991 | GEORGE BLACK, George Black is a contributing editor to the Nation
In the flesh, Yegor K. Ligachev comes as something of a surprise. Formerly No. 2 to Mikhail S. Gorbachev in the Soviet Politburo, Ligachev is on his first visit to the United States. He's doing a little advance promotion for his autobiography, due out next year. But he also wants to correct his image in the West as the arch-enemy of democratic reform--and perhaps correct the impression that his career is over. On both counts he is partly successful.
OPINION
July 14, 1991 | VLADIMIR POZNER, Vladimir Pozner, a Soviet political commentator and television celebrity, is the author of "Parting With Illusions" (Atlantic Monthly Press).
As the members of the G-7 prepare to meet with Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, as they deliberate whether they should or should not lend more than a sympathetic ear to his appeal for economic support, they would do well to take careful stock of the good news and the bad news about the Soviet Union.
NEWS
January 29, 1991 | Joel Ostrow\f7 , Times Moscow bureau researcher
The pro-Moscow "salvation committees" that tried to oust the pro-independence governments in Latvia and Lithuania this month are only the latest manifestations of conservative strength in the Soviet Union. Here is a listing of major organizations on the Soviet right and the far right: PAMYAT ("MEMORY")--Coalition of six extreme rightist organizations with varying agendas.
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