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Viktor P Barannikov

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NEWS
August 24, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The sweeping purge of hard-line officials launched by Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and Russian leader Boris N. Yeltsin turns Moscow sharply toward reforms long espoused by the United States, President Bush and other U.S. officials said Friday. Bush, assessing Gorbachev's actions from his vacation home in Kennebunkport, Me.
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NEWS
August 24, 1991
Under pressure from Boris N. Yeltsin, Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev moved to replace more ministers and government officials. A look at who is in and who is out: FOREIGN MINISTER: Advises on foreign policy OUT: Alexander A. Bessmertnykh President Gorbachev criticized him as being "quite passive" during the abortive three-day coup.
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NEWS
August 24, 1991
Under pressure from Boris N. Yeltsin, Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev moved to replace more ministers and government officials. A look at who is in and who is out: FOREIGN MINISTER: Advises on foreign policy OUT: Alexander A. Bessmertnykh President Gorbachev criticized him as being "quite passive" during the abortive three-day coup.
NEWS
August 24, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The sweeping purge of hard-line officials launched by Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and Russian leader Boris N. Yeltsin turns Moscow sharply toward reforms long espoused by the United States, President Bush and other U.S. officials said Friday. Bush, assessing Gorbachev's actions from his vacation home in Kennebunkport, Me.
NEWS
August 24, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Communist Party, accused of complicity in the conservative coup d'etat this week, came under strong attack across the nation Friday, and its 73-year hold on power appeared to be slipping fast. Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin ordered the suspension of all the party's activities in the Russian Federation, the country's largest republic, and halted the publication of its newspapers, including the party daily Pravda, on grounds that they had backed the putsch.
NEWS
November 18, 1993 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Election officials Wednesday turned down petitions from voters in a remote Russian district to list imprisoned former Parliament Chairman Ruslan I. Khasbulatov on the ballot in Dec. 12 elections for a new legislature. The Central Elections Commission acted on the basis of a decree by President Boris N. Yeltsin, made public Tuesday, that disqualifies from the race all 20 men charged with leading mass anti-government disturbances Oct. 3 and 4.
NEWS
April 3, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin's political archrival took a final sharp dig at him Friday just hours before Yeltsin set off for his summit meeting with President Clinton in Vancouver, Canada. In a potent reminder of the domestic troubles that Yeltsin brings today as baggage to the summit, Parliament Chairman Ruslan I. Khasbulatov said Western leaders have been in too much of a rush to support the Russian president.
NEWS
September 19, 1993 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin said Saturday that he would agree to early presidential elections to resolve Russia's seemingly hopeless political gridlock--but only if parliamentary elections were held six months earlier. Yeltsin made the surprise offer after he was once again outmaneuvered by political foes in a bid to create what would amount to an alternative parliament.
NEWS
March 25, 1993 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. intelligence officials began quietly informing Congress that Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin would invoke extraordinary powers two weeks before he actually said he would do so, according to congressional sources. In a series of closed-door sessions, CIA and other intelligence officials prepared members of the Senate and the House for Yeltsin's announcement last Saturday, thus effectively ensuring that there would be little surprise or controversy in Washington.
NEWS
July 28, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the highest-level dismissal yet linked to rampant corruption, the head of the KGB successor agency responsible for state security was fired Tuesday by Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin for alleged abuse of office and incompetence. Security Minister Viktor P. Barannikov, who began his law enforcement career 22 years ago as a police cadet and district officer, was accused of improperly using his influence to arrange trips for relatives abroad.
NEWS
August 24, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Communist Party, accused of complicity in the conservative coup d'etat this week, came under strong attack across the nation Friday, and its 73-year hold on power appeared to be slipping fast. Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin ordered the suspension of all the party's activities in the Russian Federation, the country's largest republic, and halted the publication of its newspapers, including the party daily Pravda, on grounds that they had backed the putsch.
NEWS
August 19, 1993 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An anti-corruption commission appointed by Boris N. Yeltsin on Wednesday accused two key government figures and political rivals of the Russian president of corruption. Vice President Alexander V. Rutskoi was charged with having at least two country houses and a secret Swiss bank account, and General Prosecutor Valentin G. Stepankov was accused of discussing the murder of a political foe.
NEWS
September 28, 1993 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying "I am not going to compromise," President Boris N. Yeltsin on Monday ruled out the simultaneous elections for president and Parliament that his foes hinted they might accept to end Russia's 6-day-old political crisis.
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