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Viktor V Ilyushin

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September 23, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man with the thick black mustache was seated in the front row of the Kremlin Palace of Congresses. Every so often, he would scribble a few words on a piece of paper and pass it to his boss at the microphone. The hulking, silver-haired man at the mike, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin, would unfold the scraps and peruse them. Sometimes he showed them to his neighbor, Mikhail S. Gorbachev, before they decided how to proceed.
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NEWS
September 23, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man with the thick black mustache was seated in the front row of the Kremlin Palace of Congresses. Every so often, he would scribble a few words on a piece of paper and pass it to his boss at the microphone. The hulking, silver-haired man at the mike, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin, would unfold the scraps and peruse them. Sometimes he showed them to his neighbor, Mikhail S. Gorbachev, before they decided how to proceed.
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NEWS
November 4, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A stiff and slurring President Boris N. Yeltsin appeared on television Friday in an apparent attempt to ease growing concerns about his health and who is running Russia. The heavily edited film footage gave the Russian public and the outside world their first look at the 64-year-old leader since he suffered a heart ailment nine days ago. But the tape showing less than one minute of his half-hour meeting with Prime Minister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin may have raised more questions than it answered.
NEWS
January 25, 1995 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The shadowy and powerful hard-liners in President Boris N. Yeltsin's inner circle are trying to consolidate their power by creating an elite National Guard to neutralize any internal threats, Russia's leading newspaper reported Tuesday. The article in the daily Izvestia was seen as the latest in a series of signals that Kremlin hawks and a resurgent KGB are trying--albeit fitfully and with resistance--to reimpose Soviet-style political controls on Russia.
NEWS
March 8, 1997 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin followed up on promises that Russia will speed up its flagging economic reform program by reappointing a liberal ally, Anatoly B. Chubais, as a first deputy prime minister Friday. The 41-year-old Chubais, who led an ambitious Russian privatization program in the early 1990s, has long drawn the ire of Communist critics of the often harsh post-Soviet economic restructuring.
NEWS
January 22, 1996 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What seemed implausible a few weeks ago is now all but official: Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin--who stumbled through the past year with an unpopular war, single-digit approval ratings and heart ailments that confined him to bed for nearly four months--is up and running for reelection.
NEWS
July 15, 1995 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin has canceled a state visit to Norway and all other activities on his schedule next week to stay in the hospital and continue recovering from heart trouble, aides announced Friday. Repeated earlier reports from the Kremlin had said that the 64-year-old Russian leader, who was rushed to the hospital Tuesday, was quickly improving and would check out Monday. In disclosing the abrupt change of plans, Yeltsin aide Viktor V.
NEWS
August 16, 1996 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin named the youthful founder of Russia's richest private bank Thursday to join his new Cabinet as manager of the country's free-market reforms, weakening the clout of conservative Soviet-era industrialists to the lowest level in years. Vladimir O. Potanin, 35, who as head of Onexim Bank has bought into industries and ousted their "red directors," became one of three first deputy prime ministers in a government led by holdover reformers and trusted Yeltsin aides.
NEWS
October 27, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin was taken by helicopter to a Moscow hospital with a heart ailment Thursday, only two days after returning from a New York summit with President Clinton that aides blamed for straining the Russian leader's health. The sudden aggravation of a heart condition that has plagued Yeltsin for nearly a decade prompted the Kremlin to cancel a state visit to China in two weeks and threw into doubt Tuesday's scheduled gathering of Balkan leaders in Moscow.
NEWS
June 29, 1996 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin's decision Friday to cancel appearances for the third time this week sparked so much speculation about his health in the homestretch of a reelection drive that aides released a videotape showing him with a June 28 calendar page--and at least breathing.
NEWS
July 5, 1996 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After crushing Communist nostalgia in a tough reelection battle, President Boris N. Yeltsin offered an olive branch to vanquished opponents Thursday, urging his compatriots to reconcile and dispel fears of civil war and economic upheaval. "Let us not divide the country into winners and losers," Yeltsin, still distant from the public eye even in victory, told Russians in a brief television address after trouncing Communist Party challenger Gennady A. Zyuganov. "Let us get down to work.
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