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Viktor V Posuvalyuk

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NEWS
January 20, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Soviet Union is playing an unusual, behind-the-scenes diplomatic role in the Persian Gulf War, trying to use its remaining leverage in Iraq to persuade President Saddam Hussein to quit fighting--and offering to carry the surrender message from Baghdad to Washington if he does. "I hope that (the Iraqis) realize, if they decide it's time to call it quits, that we are there," Soviet Foreign Ministry spokesman Vitaly I. Churkin said in Moscow on Saturday.
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NEWS
January 20, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Soviet Union is playing an unusual, behind-the-scenes diplomatic role in the Persian Gulf War, trying to use its remaining leverage in Iraq to persuade President Saddam Hussein to quit fighting--and offering to carry the surrender message from Baghdad to Washington if he does. "I hope that (the Iraqis) realize, if they decide it's time to call it quits, that we are there," Soviet Foreign Ministry spokesman Vitaly I. Churkin said in Moscow on Saturday.
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NEWS
January 19, 1991 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After an intense round of diplomacy to keep Israel out of the Persian Gulf War, President Bush praised Israeli restraint Friday in response to the first Iraqi missile attack and pledged an exhaustive effort to hunt down and destroy Saddam Hussein's missile launchers. In his first news conference since the war began early Thursday morning, Bush also warned, as he has in other settings, that "there will be losses" in the gulf conflict. "There will be obstacles along the way.
NEWS
February 21, 1991 | JACK NELSON, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev has jeopardized his warm relations with the United States by pushing a last-ditch Gulf peace proposal that President Bush considers an ill-advised gesture to win greater Soviet influence in the Arab world at the expense of allied goals, government analysts said Wednesday.
NEWS
January 19, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After nearly 48 relentless hours of surgical cruise missile strikes and bombing runs, Baghdad resembles a ghost town, its inhabitants having fled or in hiding, its sprawling residential districts largely intact but empty.
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