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Viktor Yanukovich

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February 9, 2010 | By Megan K. Stack
Pressure swelled Monday for Ukrainian Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko to bow out gracefully from a hard-fought and narrowly lost presidential race. But the calls for closure were met with silence from Tymoshenko. The politician known for her relentless drive and seemingly bottomless patience for political tussles stayed out of sight as the country waited for a concession -- or a battle cry. Events appeared to be marching forward without her. Hundreds of supporters of her opponent, Viktor Yanukovich, celebrated his victory -- and called upon Tymoshenko to relinquish the campaign -- in a rowdy rally in central Kiev, the capital.
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WORLD
April 8, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW - Heavily armed separatists held Ukrainian government buildings and hostages Tuesday as tensions increased sharply and threatened to push a dispute over treatment of the country's ethnic Russians into bloodshed. Ukrainian government officials said pro-Russia separatists had rigged explosives in a building in Luhansk and were holding hostages inside. Officials dispatched a deputy prime minister to another city, Donetsk, to try to negotiate a peaceful solution to the takeover of an administration building in that mining city.
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WORLD
February 10, 2010 | By Megan K. Stack
Supporters of Ukrainian Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko said Tuesday that she would turn to the courts to address fraud in the weekend presidential election, in which her foe leads by a decisive margin. With virtually all of the votes counted, figures from Ukraine's Central Election Commission showed Tymoshenko trailing her archrival, Viktor Yanukovich, by more than 3 percentage points. International monitors and the U.S. government have congratulated Ukraine on a fair election. But vague whispers of impending defiance continued to emanate from Tymoshenko's corner.
WORLD
April 2, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW - Ukraine's ousted president on Wednesday lamented the loss of Crimea to Russia as “a grave pain and tragedy very difficult to come to terms with” but insisted the current interim government in Kiev was solely responsible for the annexation of the region. “I personally can't agree” on the annexation of Crimea, Viktor Yanukovich said in a televised interview with the Associated Press and NTV, a Russian television network. “If this were happening under me, I would have tried to prevent it.” Yanukovich acknowledged that he had asked Russian President Vladimir Putin to deploy troops on the Ukrainian peninsula to stop “the outrages by armed gangs of nationalists.” “I also did this because I myself became an object of an attack by bandits,” he said in the interview, conducted in the Russian city Rostov-on-Don.
WORLD
February 8, 2010 | By Megan K. Stack
Viktor Yanukovich, the former mechanic who just six years ago was shunned as a pro-Moscow stooge, declared victory in Ukraine's presidential election Sunday after early exit polls showed him leading by a slim margin. Three exit polls showed Yanukovich leading by 4 to 5 percentage points in a runoff election that threatens to deepen political instability in the contentious former Soviet state. His opponent, Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko, refused to concede, and the numbers were being bitterly argued into the early hours Monday.
WORLD
February 25, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko and Carol J. Williams
KIEV, Ukraine - Hoping to reach a consensus that would heal some of Ukraine's wounds, the country's acting president on Tuesday delayed the seating of an interim government for at least two days, even as opposition colleagues appealed to the Hague criminal tribunal to try fugitive ex-President Viktor Yanukovich on charges of crimes against humanity. Reports of mounting discord among ethnic Russians in eastern Ukraine and gunshot wounds suffered by a top aide to Yanukovich further heightened a sense that Ukraine's stability is threatened as politicians jockey for position before the May 25 presidential election.
WORLD
January 6, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Losing presidential candidate Viktor Yanukovich appealed the results of last month's election to Ukraine's Supreme Court, arguing that massive fraud was committed, a court spokeswoman said. Unofficial results from the Dec. 26 balloting show opposition candidate Viktor Yushchenko the winner. Yushchenko won in a revote after challenging Yanukovich's claim of victory in the original presidential runoff Nov. 21. Yanukovich maintains that he remains the legitimately elected president.
WORLD
April 1, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
More than 70,000 demonstrators in Kiev called on the president to defeat a challenge from the rival prime minister by dissolving parliament and calling new elections. A smaller rally supported the prime minister. President Viktor Yushchenko accused Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovich of trying to usurp power by recruiting lawmakers allied with the president. Dissolving parliament could spark a crisis, particularly if Yanukovich's coalition refuses to abide by such a move.
WORLD
July 12, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Ukraine's pro-Russian parliamentary majority nominated President Viktor Yushchenko's Orange Revolution foe as premier after a chaotic session in which the president's frustrated allies brawled and refused to take their seats. The nomination of Viktor Yanukovich, whose fraud-marred run for the 2004 presidency sparked the Orange Revolution mass protests, was a humiliating setback for Yushchenko, who defeated Yanukovich in a court-ordered election rerun.
WORLD
July 8, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The main Ukrainian opposition party joined up with two other groups in parliament Friday, and the new coalition proposed pro-Russian politician Viktor Yanukovich as prime minister. The realignment means that Yanukovich, the Kremlin-backed candidate in the 2004 presidential election that sparked the mass protests dubbed the Orange Revolution, could end up serving as prime minister to his onetime opponent, President Viktor Yushchenko.
WORLD
March 17, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey, Christi Parsons and Sergei L. Loiko
WASHINGTON - In the most direct East-West confrontation since the Cold War, the White House and the European Union imposed sanctions against more than two dozen Russian and Ukrainian officials Monday and threatened more penalties if Moscow does not back down in Crimea. However, Russian President Vladimir Putin issued a decree that recognized Crimea as "sovereign and independent" after Sunday's overwhelming vote there in favor of secession from Ukraine. Legislators in Crimea on Monday declared the region independent of Ukraine and set a course to formally join Russia: They adopted the Russian ruble as the official currency and began to nationalize assets of the Ukrainian government and state-owned companies.
WORLD
February 25, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko and Carol J. Williams
KIEV, Ukraine - Hoping to reach a consensus that would heal some of Ukraine's wounds, the country's acting president on Tuesday delayed the seating of an interim government for at least two days, even as opposition colleagues appealed to the Hague criminal tribunal to try fugitive ex-President Viktor Yanukovich on charges of crimes against humanity. Reports of mounting discord among ethnic Russians in eastern Ukraine and gunshot wounds suffered by a top aide to Yanukovich further heightened a sense that Ukraine's stability is threatened as politicians jockey for position before the May 25 presidential election.
WORLD
February 25, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams, This post has been updated and corrected. See the notes below for details.
MOSCOW -- Ukraine's acting president said Tuesday that it would be at least two more days before an interim government is in place as further negotiations are needed to ensure that a genuine “coalition of national faith” agrees to see the divided country through to May 25 elections. Interim President Olexander Turchynov made the announcement to the parliament now dominated by opposition figures and defected members of fugitive ex-President Viktor Yanukovich's Party of Regions.
WORLD
February 24, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko and Carol J. Williams
KIEV, Ukraine - Ukraine's acting government issued an arrest warrant for President Viktor Yanukovich on Monday and warned the international community that the country needs $35 billion in aid to avert default. Yanukovich slipped out of Kiev on Friday after signing a European Union-brokered agreement that ended bloody confrontation between police and opposition demonstrators by calling for an interim, multiparty government and early elections to replace the effectively deposed head of state.
WORLD
February 23, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MEZHGORYE, Ukraine - The center of Kiev was relatively calm Sunday after the months of protests that reached their violent apex last week, leaving scores dead in the streets, driving Ukraine's president out of the capital and placing the opposition in tenuous control of this troubled nation. But on the highways leading north of the city, it was a different matter. The roadways were clogged with cars, drivers madly honking, edging their way forward and then parking anywhere they could, leaving people to continue on foot.
WORLD
February 22, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko
KIEV, Ukraine - The most ardent foe of Ukraine's embattled president was freed from prison Saturday and rushed to the capital, where she was greeted by tens of thousands of supporters chanting her name, some so overcome by emotion that they fainted. Events in Kiev and around the country had the feel of a revolution nearing its culmination. Having retreated to his eastern stronghold, President Viktor Yanukovich fulminated in an Internet clip against "Nazis" and "bandits. " He insisted he still was the country's leader and that he would not resign.
WORLD
January 18, 2005 | From Associated Press
The Supreme Court rejected an array of motions from defeated Ukrainian presidential candidate Viktor Yanukovich on Monday but did not issue a final ruling on the former prime minister's attempt to fend off the inauguration of his Western-leaning rival. After a day of arguments, the court adjourned until today, leaving open the question of when former opposition leader Viktor Yushchenko might be inaugurated. Yushchenko was declared the winner of a Dec.
WORLD
February 7, 2010 | By Megan K. Stack
When it comes to messy politics -- and old-fashioned entertainment -- it's hard to top the theatrics of the relatively young democracy in Ukraine. Here are a few choice moments from the presidential campaign that ended with Sunday's runoff election: While on a campaign stop in the western city of Lviv -- an area typically unreceptive to his historically pro-Russia politics -- candidate Viktor Yanukovich had an embarrassing slip of the tongue, Ukrainian...
WORLD
February 21, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko
KIEV, Ukraine - After a violent week that turned parts of his capital into a war zone, Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovich agreed Friday to a new election and a coalition government in a deal that appeared likely to seal his political fate and bring his imprisoned rival back onto the stage. It was far from clear, however, that Ukraine could avoid more of the bloodshed that has killed at least 100 people in the country, the worst violence in its post-Soviet history. Crowds enraged by the deaths of protesters in volleys of sniper fire the previous day greeted opposition leaders who signed the agreement with the president with angry shouts and whistles.
WORLD
February 20, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko
KIEV, Ukraine - He bent over the limp body and raised a corner of the bloody white sheet that covered it. Volodymyr Holodnyuk let out a dull moan and let the fabric drop. He then picked up a blue helmet that lay at the feet of the body, its insides gummy with blood, and ran his trembling fingers along the surface until he found what he was looking for: a hole left by a 7.62-millimeter bullet, the sort used by a Dragunov sniper rifle. The helmet, and the body, belonged to Holodnyuk's son, Ustym, a 19-year-old engineering student who was among at least 67 protesters killed in central Kiev early Thursday, at least 20 of them brought down by snipers.
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