Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsViktor Yanukovych
IN THE NEWS

Viktor Yanukovych

FEATURED ARTICLES
WORLD
November 11, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Opposition reformer Viktor Yushchenko barely edged out the pro-Kremlin candidate in the first round of the presidential vote, setting up a runoff later this month for the leadership of the former Soviet republic, official results showed. Yushchenko won 39.87%, half a percentage point ahead of Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovych in the Oct. 31 balloting, the Central Elections Commission announced. Earlier counts had shown Yanukovych narrowly ahead. The two face a Nov. 21 runoff.
ARTICLES BY DATE
Advertisement
NEWS
December 5, 2004 | From Associated Press
The Supreme Court ordered a rerun of the head-to-head presidential contest between Western-leaning Viktor Yushchenko and the Kremlin-backed candidate Dec. 26, setting off rejoicing Friday by opposition supporters who waved orange flags and ignited fireworks as they chanted "Yushchenko! Yushchenko!" The court found that government bodies had "illegally meddled in the election process" and distorted the results of the Nov. 21 runoff.
SPORTS
October 25, 2013 | By Chuck Schilken
Heavyweight boxing champion Vitali Klitschko announced his intention to run for president of Ukraine in 2015. The older brother of fellow heavyweight champ Wladimir Klitschko declared his candidacy in front of the Ukrainian parliament during a speech Thursday. Klitschko hasn't fought since defending his WBC belt against Manuel Charr in 2012. He was scheduled to make a mandatory title defense against Bermane Stiverne last month but pulled out, saying he had a right hand injury.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2012 | By Chris Barton
In an odd collision between art, fairy tales and an as-yet unfilmed reality show, a Ukrainian-born artist staged a live re-creation of the "Sleeping Beauty" story inside the National Art Museum in Kiev. Inside a dimly lit upstairs gallery, the Canadian-based artist Taras Polataiko presented five attractive women who took turns sleeping on a stark, satiny bed for two hours each day. In keeping with the story, each woman pledged to marry the person who wakes them with a kiss for Polataiko's "Sleeping Beauties.
SPORTS
March 5, 2014 | By Kevin Baxter
It was supposed to be a final U.S. tune-up for this summer's World Cup. But what Wednesday's 2-0 loss to the Ukraine in Cyprus proved is the American national soccer team likely needs a complete overhaul if it expects to be competitive in Brazil. A first-half goal by Andriy Yarmolenko and a second-half score by Marko Devic capped an emotional week for the Ukraine, which nearly canceled the match after Russian troops occupied the Crimean peninsula last weekend. Instead they turned the game into a display of patriotism.
WORLD
February 19, 2014 | By Christi Parsons
TOLUCA, Mexico -- President Obama warned all sides in the deadly Ukrainian conflict Wednesday that “there will be consequences if people step over the line,” but said he holds the government “primarily responsible” for showing restraint in dealing with the opposition. “I want to be very clear as we work through these next several days in Ukraine that we're going to be watching closely, and we expect the Ukrainian government to show restraint, to not resort to violence in dealing with peaceful protesters,” Obama said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
"Dallas Buyers Club" star and newly crowned Academy Award winner Jared Leto was the only Hollywood figure to address the current political unrest in Ukraine during the award show Sunday, but his words of support for the former Soviet republic weren't heard in Russia, where an edited, taped broadcast of the ceremony aired Monday. With tensions escalating between the two nations, Leto said in his acceptance speech for supporting actor, "To all the dreamers out there around the world watching this tonight, in places like the Ukraine and Venezuela, I want to say we are here.
NATIONAL
March 4, 2014 | By David Horsey
Russia seems to have learned little in the 160 years since the Crimean War. Launching ships and sending armies to grab land may work in the short term, but there are always negative consequences that bring big regrets later. In 1853, Russia's man in charge was Czar Nicholas I, who hoped to take advantage of the weakening Ottoman Empire and expand Russian power and influence around the Black Sea and beyond. In 1853, using the pretext of protecting Orthodox Christians in the Ottoman-controlled Holy Land, Russia went to war and quickly destroyed the Ottoman fleet.
WORLD
November 21, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
Ukraine announced Thursday that it was suspending its bid to join the European Union in favor of working toward better trade ties with Russia, a sign of the Kremlin's success in keeping a former Soviet republic within its political orbit. Prime Minister Mykola Azarov said his government made the decision to turn East rather than West "with the aim of adopting measures to ensure national security. " The statement followed the Ukrainian parliament's rejection earlier Thursday of six different measures that would have let jailed opposition leader Yulia Tymoshenko leave the country for medical treatment abroad.
NATIONAL
October 1, 2012 | By David Horsey, This post has been updated. See the note at the bottom for details
KIEV, Ukraine - Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych is the model of a new kind of power-grabbing authoritarian. Gone is the preening, bullying fascist in a comical military costume, like Hitler or Mussolini. Mao's jacket and Fidel Castro's combat fatigues are out of fashion. Today, it is all business. Today, Stalin would be wearing Hugo Boss or Brooks Brothers, his mustache would be shaved off and he, like Yanukovych, would look like any chief executive flying business class. The pogrom and the putsch have given way to PR. Yanukovych has hired lobbyists and public relations teams to help him project a progressive image while he quietly squeezes the press and rejiggers election laws to guarantee his party permanent rule.  An example of this is the Podesta Group's $200,000 contract with an entity called the European Centre for a Modern Ukraine.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|