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Viktoria Mullova

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1987 | JOHN HENKEN
One would never guess simply from appearance that Viktoria Mullova owns a commanding, original and thoroughly persuasive interpretation of Tchaikovsky's Violin Concerto. She looked as if might have walked on stage Thursday at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion simply to set the score on the conductor's music rack. But the thin, pale, serious young woman in an unadorned black jump suit carried a violin, which she quickly proved she could play with rare control.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2000 | MARK SWED
If you want to hear Salonen conduct the Los Angeles Philharmonic during his sabbatical year, you will have to do it via CD. And that has just gotten easier with three recent releases, and more are on the way (discs of Hindemith, Bach transcriptions and John Adams' "Naive and Sentimental Music" are in the can).
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1993 | JOHN HENKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Esa-Pekka Salonen's efforts to bring new music into the Los Angeles Philharmonic repertory gets all the attention, but he also has been quietly reclaiming some old music that has been largely conceded in recent years to chamber orchestras and period specialists. His latest concerts at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion featured early and late Haydn symphonies, surrounding Bartok's Second Violin Concerto, with Viktoria Mullova the elegant, intelligent protagonist.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1997 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Thursday night in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Esa-Pekka Salonen and the Los Angeles Philharmonic, with Russian soloist Viktoria Mullova, gave the first of four performances alternating violin concertos by Stravinsky and Bartok. Next week, the same forces will be recording these works. Mullova, in a persimmon-red gown over black tights, played the Stravinsky work energetically, with a full but raw tone and little polish; afterward, an enthusiastic audience cheered her efforts.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1985
As a patron of the performing arts, I was flabbergasted beyond belief when I read the Music News item on Russian-born violinist Viktoria Mullova ("Defections & Reflections," by Marc Shulgold, April 7). I have yet to discover the rationale of a U.S. foundation donating a $349,000 Stradavarius violin to a much-acclaimed, well-established, world-renowned violinist who presumingly fled the Soviet Union for artistic freedom. Not only has she gained artistic freedom, but a strong financial backing as well in America.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1997 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Thursday night in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Esa-Pekka Salonen and the Los Angeles Philharmonic, with Russian soloist Viktoria Mullova, gave the first of four performances alternating violin concertos by Stravinsky and Bartok. Next week, the same forces will be recording these works. Mullova, in a persimmon-red gown over black tights, played the Stravinsky work energetically, with a full but raw tone and little polish; afterward, an enthusiastic audience cheered her efforts.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1987 | JOHN HENKEN
One would never guess simply from appearance that Viktoria Mullova owns a commanding, original and thoroughly persuasive interpretation of Tchaikovsky's Violin Concerto. She looked as if might have walked on stage Thursday at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion to set the score on the conductor's music rack. But the thin, pale, serious young woman in an unadorned black jump suit carried a violin, which she quickly proved she could play with rare control.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1990 | GRETA BEIGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The defection of Soviet violinist Viktoria Mullova and her conductor boyfriend that summer of 1983 reads like a thriller. In fact, the young couple's daring dash for freedom--and their subsequent parting of the ways--is the stuff movies are made of. "It didn't take courage to leave," Mullova reflected in a recent interview from Toronto, where she was performing. "You have to have more courage to stay there.'
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 1990 | GRETA BEIGEL
The story of Soviet violinist Viktoria Mullova and her conductor boyfriend's defection back in the summer of 1983 reads like a thriller. The young couple's daring dash for freedom--and their subsequent parting of the ways--is the stuff movies are made of. But Mullova herself reflected recently that "it didn't take courage to leave. You have to have more courage to stay there." Now 30 and living in Vienna, Mullova harbors no rancor or frustration about her struggle for liberation.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2000 | MARK SWED
If you want to hear Salonen conduct the Los Angeles Philharmonic during his sabbatical year, you will have to do it via CD. And that has just gotten easier with three recent releases, and more are on the way (discs of Hindemith, Bach transcriptions and John Adams' "Naive and Sentimental Music" are in the can).
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1993 | JOHN HENKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Esa-Pekka Salonen's efforts to bring new music into the Los Angeles Philharmonic repertory gets all the attention, but he also has been quietly reclaiming some old music that has been largely conceded in recent years to chamber orchestras and period specialists. His latest concerts at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion featured early and late Haydn symphonies, surrounding Bartok's Second Violin Concerto, with Viktoria Mullova the elegant, intelligent protagonist.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 1990 | GRETA BEIGEL
The story of Soviet violinist Viktoria Mullova and her conductor boyfriend's defection back in the summer of 1983 reads like a thriller. The young couple's daring dash for freedom--and their subsequent parting of the ways--is the stuff movies are made of. But Mullova herself reflected recently that "it didn't take courage to leave. You have to have more courage to stay there." Now 30 and living in Vienna, Mullova harbors no rancor or frustration about her struggle for liberation.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1990 | GRETA BEIGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The defection of Soviet violinist Viktoria Mullova and her conductor boyfriend that summer of 1983 reads like a thriller. In fact, the young couple's daring dash for freedom--and their subsequent parting of the ways--is the stuff movies are made of. "It didn't take courage to leave," Mullova reflected in a recent interview from Toronto, where she was performing. "You have to have more courage to stay there.'
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1987 | JOHN HENKEN
One would never guess simply from appearance that Viktoria Mullova owns a commanding, original and thoroughly persuasive interpretation of Tchaikovsky's Violin Concerto. She looked as if might have walked on stage Thursday at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion simply to set the score on the conductor's music rack. But the thin, pale, serious young woman in an unadorned black jump suit carried a violin, which she quickly proved she could play with rare control.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1987 | JOHN HENKEN
One would never guess simply from appearance that Viktoria Mullova owns a commanding, original and thoroughly persuasive interpretation of Tchaikovsky's Violin Concerto. She looked as if might have walked on stage Thursday at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion to set the score on the conductor's music rack. But the thin, pale, serious young woman in an unadorned black jump suit carried a violin, which she quickly proved she could play with rare control.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1985
As a patron of the performing arts, I was flabbergasted beyond belief when I read the Music News item on Russian-born violinist Viktoria Mullova ("Defections & Reflections," by Marc Shulgold, April 7). I have yet to discover the rationale of a U.S. foundation donating a $349,000 Stradavarius violin to a much-acclaimed, well-established, world-renowned violinist who presumingly fled the Soviet Union for artistic freedom. Not only has she gained artistic freedom, but a strong financial backing as well in America.
NEWS
April 3, 1985 | From Reuters
An anonymous U.S. foundation bought a Stradivarius violin for $349,000 at Sotheby's today and will present it to Viktoria Mullova, a Soviet violinist who defected to the United States two years ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2000 | RICHARD S. GINELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Los Angeles Philharmonic is taking advantage of Markus Stenz's affinity for new music by having him lead the group both at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion over the past weekend and tonight at the Japan America Theatre, where he leads the New Music Group in the West Coast premiere of Pierre Boulez's "Sur Incises."
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