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REAL ESTATE
May 4, 1986
The 300-unit Villa Riviera apartment complex in West Covina has been purchased from the Great Bay Co. of Boston for $16.25 million by Barranca Villa Investors Ltd., a California limited partnership. PMI Financial Inc. of Beverly Hills arranged the purchase. Villa Riviera is located at 111-131 S. Barranca Ave. The complex, with 268,000 square feet of rentable space, was built in 1972 and will be substantially refurbished, according to Scott Sternberg, general partner of Barranca.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 2013 | By Lauren Williams
At the corner of Loma Avenue and 4th Street, the Dark Knight keeps watch over the sleeping town below. Perched atop the firehouse, the Batman figurine - his gaze steady, his pose vigilant - looms as a symbol of the busy nights in the Belmont Heights neighborhood on Long Beach's east side that Fire Station 4 serves. The Belmont Heights station is one of several in Long Beach that have adopted icons that reflect the area they serve, following a New York City tradition that dates to the time of horse-drawn fire wagons.
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HOME & GARDEN
May 7, 2011 | Jeffrey Head
After a two-year restoration that included a forensic analysis of paint color and research into the curious stone creatures perched along the roofline, the 16-story Villa Riviera condominium building in Long Beach will be honored Thursday with a preservation award from the Los Angeles Conservancy. Built in 1929 by architect Richard D. King, the Tudor Gothic Revival building on East Ocean Boulevard was the first steel-frame structure in Long Beach and was the only building taller than three stories to survive the 1933 Long Beach earthquake, estimated at about 6.4 in magnitude.
HOME & GARDEN
May 7, 2011 | Jeffrey Head
After a two-year restoration that included a forensic analysis of paint color and research into the curious stone creatures perched along the roofline, the 16-story Villa Riviera condominium building in Long Beach will be honored Thursday with a preservation award from the Los Angeles Conservancy. Built in 1929 by architect Richard D. King, the Tudor Gothic Revival building on East Ocean Boulevard was the first steel-frame structure in Long Beach and was the only building taller than three stories to survive the 1933 Long Beach earthquake, estimated at about 6.4 in magnitude.
REAL ESTATE
October 4, 1987
"Long Beach Building Gets New Life" (Sept. 13) via prettification and innovative approach to strengthening unreinforced masonry walls against earthquakes--all well and good. To a point. What is omitted here is the threat posed by Long Beach's earthquake ordinance, the most Draconian of all earthquake ordinances, to its splendid older stock of pre-1933 structures in downtown Long Beach. Unless this measure is repealed or radically revised, the most interesting and historic buildings face a 1990 termination date.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 2013 | By Lauren Williams
At the corner of Loma Avenue and 4th Street, the Dark Knight keeps watch over the sleeping town below. Perched atop the firehouse, the Batman figurine - his gaze steady, his pose vigilant - looms as a symbol of the busy nights in the Belmont Heights neighborhood on Long Beach's east side that Fire Station 4 serves. The Belmont Heights station is one of several in Long Beach that have adopted icons that reflect the area they serve, following a New York City tradition that dates to the time of horse-drawn fire wagons.
NEWS
September 27, 1987 | CHRIS WOODYARD, Times Staff Writer
Despite years of efforts to save one of the city's most historic buildings, the Planning Commission has approved demolition of the Pacific Coast Club to make way for a $40-million high-rise condominium complex. Despite the action, the fortress-like, 61-year-old structure still has a faint chance of winning a last-minute reprieve. The owner of the shuttered Ocean Boulevard landmark said he is giving preservationist groups until Oct.
NEWS
March 27, 1986
"Council Kills Bid for Eviction Rights for Disabled, Aged" (Long Beach / Southeast sections, March 20) because of the fear that it might well have proven "a precursor to . . . rent control" (already overwhelmingly rejected here), hobble property rights, backlog the courts and (most importantly) cause landlords to discriminate against the very people it was supposed to be helping. And that is just what happened in Santa Monica with a more severe ordinance, with seniors being increasingly displaced by Yuppies anxious to live at the beach at bargain prices.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2003 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
The fierce-looking gargoyles that are perched in stony silence along the roof certainly aren't talking. At the Villa Riviera, it's the walls beneath them that have tales to tell about Long Beach's most elegant landmark. The 16-story French Gothic building at Ocean Boulevard and Shoreline Drive has helped define the city for nearly three-quarters of a century.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 2007 | Nancy Wride, Times Staff Writer
Historian Stan Poe squinted upward at the castle-like Villa Riviera on Wednesday, pointing out what's been lost and what's about to be restored to the 1929 Long Beach landmark. "The interior has been altered considerably," said Poe, a member of the Long Beach Cultural Heritage Commission, who should know: He was given the Villa's original brocade ballroom drapes by someone who bought them decades ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 2007 | Nancy Wride, Times Staff Writer
Historian Stan Poe squinted upward at the castle-like Villa Riviera on Wednesday, pointing out what's been lost and what's about to be restored to the 1929 Long Beach landmark. "The interior has been altered considerably," said Poe, a member of the Long Beach Cultural Heritage Commission, who should know: He was given the Villa's original brocade ballroom drapes by someone who bought them decades ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2003 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
The fierce-looking gargoyles that are perched in stony silence along the roof certainly aren't talking. At the Villa Riviera, it's the walls beneath them that have tales to tell about Long Beach's most elegant landmark. The 16-story French Gothic building at Ocean Boulevard and Shoreline Drive has helped define the city for nearly three-quarters of a century.
REAL ESTATE
October 4, 1987
"Long Beach Building Gets New Life" (Sept. 13) via prettification and innovative approach to strengthening unreinforced masonry walls against earthquakes--all well and good. To a point. What is omitted here is the threat posed by Long Beach's earthquake ordinance, the most Draconian of all earthquake ordinances, to its splendid older stock of pre-1933 structures in downtown Long Beach. Unless this measure is repealed or radically revised, the most interesting and historic buildings face a 1990 termination date.
NEWS
September 27, 1987 | CHRIS WOODYARD, Times Staff Writer
Despite years of efforts to save one of the city's most historic buildings, the Planning Commission has approved demolition of the Pacific Coast Club to make way for a $40-million high-rise condominium complex. Despite the action, the fortress-like, 61-year-old structure still has a faint chance of winning a last-minute reprieve. The owner of the shuttered Ocean Boulevard landmark said he is giving preservationist groups until Oct.
REAL ESTATE
May 4, 1986
The 300-unit Villa Riviera apartment complex in West Covina has been purchased from the Great Bay Co. of Boston for $16.25 million by Barranca Villa Investors Ltd., a California limited partnership. PMI Financial Inc. of Beverly Hills arranged the purchase. Villa Riviera is located at 111-131 S. Barranca Ave. The complex, with 268,000 square feet of rentable space, was built in 1972 and will be substantially refurbished, according to Scott Sternberg, general partner of Barranca.
NEWS
March 27, 1986
"Council Kills Bid for Eviction Rights for Disabled, Aged" (Long Beach / Southeast sections, March 20) because of the fear that it might well have proven "a precursor to . . . rent control" (already overwhelmingly rejected here), hobble property rights, backlog the courts and (most importantly) cause landlords to discriminate against the very people it was supposed to be helping. And that is just what happened in Santa Monica with a more severe ordinance, with seniors being increasingly displaced by Yuppies anxious to live at the beach at bargain prices.
REAL ESTATE
December 31, 2000 | RUTH RYON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Long Beach condo that resembles a pre-World War II Park Avenue flat was only created two years ago. It is in the Villa Riviera, built in 1928 as a French Normandy Revival-style apartment building for wealthy Midwesterners wanting to rent near the beach. About this home: Paul Watson, executive vice president of leasing at the L.A. Mart, bought a studio and a one-bedroom unit in the building, then gutted and combined them, creating one condo.
NEWS
June 19, 1986 | DARYL KELLEY, Times Staff Writer
The historic Pacific Coast Club, vacant and on the verge of demolition for years, would be 70% restored under a plan unveiled this week as owners sought support from both the community and the city. If all goes smoothly, the 60-year-old club, once the elegant gathering place of this city's elite, would be restored by 1989 with its distinctive castle-like facade and main rooms intact, said owner Robert Bellevue, president of Bellevue Corp.
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