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BUSINESS
December 10, 1997 | CLAUDIA ELLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Warner Bros. and Village Roadshow Pictures are expanding their longtime business relationship with an agreement to co-finance and distribute at least 20 movies over the next five years. Under the deal, Village Roadshow will produce the films and Warner Bros. will market and release them worldwide, except in Australia and New Zealand. Village Roadshow's parent, the publicly traded Village Roadshow Ltd.
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BUSINESS
December 10, 1997 | CLAUDIA ELLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Warner Bros. and Village Roadshow Pictures are expanding their longtime business relationship with an agreement to co-finance and distribute at least 20 movies over the next five years. Under the deal, Village Roadshow will produce the films and Warner Bros. will market and release them worldwide, except in Australia and New Zealand. Village Roadshow's parent, the publicly traded Village Roadshow Ltd.
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BUSINESS
February 29, 1996
Warner, Australia Firms Team in Cinema Expansion: The joint venture includes plans to develop 18 new multiplex cinemas, with 20 to 25 screens each, in Australia at a cost of $266 million. The expansion plan will add 70,000 seats and more than double the number of screens operated by the venture to 525. The joint venture is equally owned by Warner Bros., Village Roadshow Ltd. and Amalgamated Holdings Ltd., a subsidiary of Greater Union.
BUSINESS
May 29, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Village Roadshow Ltd., Australia's biggest cinema chain, agreed to pay $192 million for Time Warner Inc.'s stake in their theme park joint venture in Queensland state. The agreement gives Village full ownership of theme parks including Warner Bros. Movie World, Sea World and Wet 'n' Wild Water World, the Melbourne, Australia-based company said. Village will also assume Time Warner's share of the venture's debt.
BUSINESS
April 10, 2001 | From Bloomberg News
AOL Time Warner Inc., the largest Internet and media company, and Village Roadshow Ltd., Australia's biggest cinema owner, offered to buy the 32% of Australian theme park operator Sea World Property Trust they don't already own. The two companies offered 72 cents a share for the rest of Sea World, a 16% premium to the price it last traded Friday, valuing the company at about $74 million. The $23.
BUSINESS
March 5, 1999 | CLAUDIA ELLER
When Bruce Berman was head of production at Warner Bros., little did he know that some of the very projects he bought back then--including today's release "Analyze This"--would become movies he would help get financed in his new job. The economic environment of Hollywood has shifted since Berman was booted out after six years as Warner's movie chief in March 1996 and 18 months later was named chairman of Village Roadshow Pictures.
BUSINESS
April 2, 2013 | By Daniel Miller, Los Angeles Times
Village Roadshow Pictures Asia released its first Chinese-language film with no certainty the modestly budgeted movie would succeed with audiences in the world's most populous country. But "Journey to the West: Conquering the Demons," a comedic take on a well-known 16th century Chinese fantasy novel, had a February opening-week gross of $93.5 million - the biggest ever in China. It already has made $200.5 million, and it could go on to gross more at China's box office than any other Chinese-made film in history.
BUSINESS
September 26, 2008 | Josh Friedman, Times Staff Writer
The summer popcorn movie season ended weeks ago. Or did it? DreamWorks/Paramount's "Eagle Eye," a techno-thriller starring Shia LaBeouf, could reap the first opening-weekend gross above $30 million since early August, when "The Mummy: Curse of the Crystal Dragon Whatever" came out. Box-office revenue in the U.S. and Canada has been down for eight of the last nine weekends, but the PG-13-rated "Eagle Eye," opening at 3,510 theaters including 86...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1996 | Suzanne Muchnic, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
'California, from an eastern perspective, has generally been seen as another country on the far edge of America, only tenuously attached to what is understood as Western civilization," Paul J. Karlstrom writes in the introduction to a new book on art in California. Furthermore, because the state has been identified with Hollywood and popular culture, it has been denied its rightful place in the mainstream of Modernism, he argues.
BUSINESS
September 2, 2008 | Josh Friedman, Times Staff Writer
No matter how bad the economy gets, people will always head to the movies for two hours of affordable entertainment -- or so the theory goes. Three theaters coming to Southern California next year are putting that thesis to a big test with ticket prices as high as $35. Australian company Village Roadshow Ltd. plans to bring its Gold Class luxury cinemas to Pasadena, Costa Mesa and Ontario, kicking the luxury-theater concept up a notch --...
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