Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVillage Roadshow Pictures
IN THE NEWS

Village Roadshow Pictures

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
May 11, 2009 | Ben Fritz
What's $120 million between friends? Village Roadshow Pictures, which has owed that much to Warner Bros. for nearly a year on four films released in 2008, has repaid the studio after restructuring its $1.4-billion credit line. Amid last year's financial collapse, the Australian film financing company unexpectedly lost access to funds it had committed to use for a 50% stake in "Get Smart," "Gran Torino," "Nights in Rodanthe" and "Yes Man." It has been co-financing Warner movies for over a decade.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2013 | By Amy Kaufman
“The Great Gatsby” wasn't the No. 1 film at the box office this weekend, but Warner Bros. executives may be breaking out the bubbly anyway. Baz Luhrmann's 3-D take on of F. Scott Fitzgerald's 1920s novel lost out to “Iron Man 3,” the superhero behemoth that has already made nearly a billion dollars worldwide. In its second weekend of domestic release, the Marvel Studios production collected $72.5 million, according to an estimate from distributor Walt Disney Studios. That left "Gatsby" to settle for the runner-up position, though the film starring Leonardo DiCaprio surpassed industry expectations with a healthy debut of $51.1 million.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
June 29, 2012 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
Warner Bros. is poised to extend its partnership with one of its two main co-financiers, while the fate of the studio's ongoing relationship with its other key investor remains uncertain. Village Roadshow Entertainment, which put up half the money for such franchises as "Sherlock Holmes," "Happy Feet" and "The Matrix," has raised $380 million in new equity. The funds put the Australian company on stronger financial footing and will allow its Hollywood unit, Village Roadshow Pictures, to begin talks to renew its longtime deal with Warner.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2013 | By John Horn
When Sony Pictures decided against making Baz Luhrmann's “The Great Gatsby,” the studio feared its budget (slightly more than $100 million, thanks to hefty Australian rebates) and nearly century-old source material made it a risk not worth taking. Now that the film has come on audience tracking surveys, Sony might be regretting its decision. Marketing executives at rival studios believe that “The Great Gatsby,” which opens May 10 (there are some 10 p.m. shows on May 9)
BUSINESS
December 10, 1997 | CLAUDIA ELLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Warner Bros. and Village Roadshow Pictures are expanding their longtime business relationship with an agreement to co-finance and distribute at least 20 movies over the next five years. Under the deal, Village Roadshow will produce the films and Warner Bros. will market and release them worldwide, except in Australia and New Zealand. Village Roadshow's parent, the publicly traded Village Roadshow Ltd.
BUSINESS
August 17, 2010 | By Claudia Eller, Los Angeles Times
In an era when movie capital is tough to come by, David Ellison, the 27-year-old son of Oracle Corp. co-founder and Chief Executive Larry Ellison, has raised $350 million to co-finance films with his studio partner Paramount Pictures. The funds — $150 million in equity and a four-year, $200-million revolving credit facility led by JPMorgan Chase & Co. — will enable Ellison to step up production at his movie label Skydance Productions. Ellison's father, ranked by Forbes magazine as the sixth-richest person in the world, with an estimated net worth of $28 billion, provided an undisclosed portion of the equity, according to people with knowledge of the deal.
BUSINESS
September 22, 2010 | By Ben Fritz and Claudia Eller, Los Angeles Times
Halfway through the production of "Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga'Hoole," director Zack Snyder began feeling pressure to lighten the tone of his 3-D animated feature. Executives at Warner Bros. and Village Roadshow Pictures, the movie's backers, were worried that the story was too dark for younger audiences, a primary target. They wanted Snyder, known for the R-rated action movies "300" and " Watchmen," to add humor and "charm" to "Guardian's" tale about the battle between good and evil in a fantasy owl kingdom.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2013 | By John Horn
When Sony Pictures decided against making Baz Luhrmann's “The Great Gatsby,” the studio feared its budget (slightly more than $100 million, thanks to hefty Australian rebates) and nearly century-old source material made it a risk not worth taking. Now that the film has come on audience tracking surveys, Sony might be regretting its decision. Marketing executives at rival studios believe that “The Great Gatsby,” which opens May 10 (there are some 10 p.m. shows on May 9)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2013 | By Amy Kaufman
“The Great Gatsby” wasn't the No. 1 film at the box office this weekend, but Warner Bros. executives may be breaking out the bubbly anyway. Baz Luhrmann's 3-D take on of F. Scott Fitzgerald's 1920s novel lost out to “Iron Man 3,” the superhero behemoth that has already made nearly a billion dollars worldwide. In its second weekend of domestic release, the Marvel Studios production collected $72.5 million, according to an estimate from distributor Walt Disney Studios. That left "Gatsby" to settle for the runner-up position, though the film starring Leonardo DiCaprio surpassed industry expectations with a healthy debut of $51.1 million.
BUSINESS
January 22, 1998 | MARLA MATZER
Miramax Films Chief Harvey Weinstein struck a deal for a reported $6 million Wednesday for rights to "The Castle," an independent Australian comedy made for about $500,000. Miramax gets rights in North America and all other available foreign territories; Paramount Pictures previously acquired rights in Britain and South Africa.
BUSINESS
June 29, 2012 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
Warner Bros. is poised to extend its partnership with one of its two main co-financiers, while the fate of the studio's ongoing relationship with its other key investor remains uncertain. Village Roadshow Entertainment, which put up half the money for such franchises as "Sherlock Holmes," "Happy Feet" and "The Matrix," has raised $380 million in new equity. The funds put the Australian company on stronger financial footing and will allow its Hollywood unit, Village Roadshow Pictures, to begin talks to renew its longtime deal with Warner.
BUSINESS
September 22, 2010 | By Ben Fritz and Claudia Eller, Los Angeles Times
Halfway through the production of "Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga'Hoole," director Zack Snyder began feeling pressure to lighten the tone of his 3-D animated feature. Executives at Warner Bros. and Village Roadshow Pictures, the movie's backers, were worried that the story was too dark for younger audiences, a primary target. They wanted Snyder, known for the R-rated action movies "300" and " Watchmen," to add humor and "charm" to "Guardian's" tale about the battle between good and evil in a fantasy owl kingdom.
BUSINESS
August 17, 2010 | By Claudia Eller, Los Angeles Times
In an era when movie capital is tough to come by, David Ellison, the 27-year-old son of Oracle Corp. co-founder and Chief Executive Larry Ellison, has raised $350 million to co-finance films with his studio partner Paramount Pictures. The funds — $150 million in equity and a four-year, $200-million revolving credit facility led by JPMorgan Chase & Co. — will enable Ellison to step up production at his movie label Skydance Productions. Ellison's father, ranked by Forbes magazine as the sixth-richest person in the world, with an estimated net worth of $28 billion, provided an undisclosed portion of the equity, according to people with knowledge of the deal.
BUSINESS
May 11, 2009 | Ben Fritz
What's $120 million between friends? Village Roadshow Pictures, which has owed that much to Warner Bros. for nearly a year on four films released in 2008, has repaid the studio after restructuring its $1.4-billion credit line. Amid last year's financial collapse, the Australian film financing company unexpectedly lost access to funds it had committed to use for a 50% stake in "Get Smart," "Gran Torino," "Nights in Rodanthe" and "Yes Man." It has been co-financing Warner movies for over a decade.
BUSINESS
December 10, 1997 | CLAUDIA ELLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Warner Bros. and Village Roadshow Pictures are expanding their longtime business relationship with an agreement to co-finance and distribute at least 20 movies over the next five years. Under the deal, Village Roadshow will produce the films and Warner Bros. will market and release them worldwide, except in Australia and New Zealand. Village Roadshow's parent, the publicly traded Village Roadshow Ltd.
BUSINESS
May 28, 2010 | By Ben Fritz and Claudia Eller, Los Angeles Times
Amid a drought for new outside money in the movie business, Warner Bros.' longtime co-financing partner Village Roadshow Pictures Group has restructured its $900-million facility that was set to expire in September, extending it to 2015 and increasing it modestly to $1 billion. The increase in available production funds is good news for Village Roadshow, although it still falls far short of the amount in its earlier financing facility. In the financial meltdown of 2008, Village Roadshow lost access to some of the funds in its then-$1.
BUSINESS
October 14, 2012 | By Roger Vincent
A Beverly Hills office building popular with entertainment industry tenants has sold for $80 million to New York real estate investment manager Clarion Partners. The property at 100 N. Crescent Drive is home to record industry giant Concord Music Group, movie maker Village Roadshow Pictures and RealD Inc., the world's leading supplier of 3-D technology to cinemas. The 120,000-square-foot, four-story building at the intersection of Crescent and Wilshire Boulevard is one of the first fully occupied offices to be sold in Beverly Hills since the economic downturn.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|