Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVillage Voice
IN THE NEWS

Village Voice

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1985 | United Press International
Village Voice owner Leonard Stern said Friday that he plans to raise $100 million to build emergency shelters for 2,000 homeless families in New York City. City shelters took in a record 8,615 people Thursday night, up 60 from the previous record, set Wednesday night, according to the city's Human Resources Administration. The shelters would be leased to the city at cost.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2014 | Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
Donald Forst, a veteran newsman who led New York Newsday and the Village Voice as they won Pulitzer Prizes and also helped resuscitate the Los Angeles Herald Examiner, died Saturday in Albany, N.Y. He was 81. He had colon cancer, said his companion, Val Haynes. Forst's journalism career started in the mid-1950s and included stints as cultural editor of the New York Times, assistant city editor of the New York Post and editor in chief of the Boston Herald. He also worked at more than a dozen other publications, including the Houston Press, Boston magazine and the New York Herald Tribune.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Fred W. McDarrah, a Village Voice photographer who chronicled some of New York's most important cultural and political events during more than three decades at the alternative weekly, has died. He was 81. McDarrah died Tuesday in his sleep at his home in Greenwich Village, a day after celebrating his 81st birthday and 47th wedding anniversary, said his son Patrick McDarrah.
NEWS
October 9, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
The mysterious street artist Banksy is now well into his monthlong artist's “residency” on the streets of New York, in which he's been throwing up new pieces around the city daily. He's done quite a bit of viral marketing to promote the show, called “Better Out Than In,” using both his website and a new Instagram account. (The Twitter feed “banksyny,” now followed by more than 6,600 people and a heavy concentration of media, is not his.) Before the Oct. 1 launch of his show, signs reading “Banksy October 2013” even started popping up around Los Angeles to stir up speculation that the show might be opening here.
NEWS
April 25, 1996 | PAUL D. COLFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Village Voice, which now calls itself "The Newspaper That Can't Be Bought," is also a newspaper that can't be found. Since the weekly switched to free distribution in Manhattan two weeks ago--and more than doubled circulation in the borough, to 150,000--spot checks throughout Midtown have found many of the paper's new curbside boxes empty from Day One.
BUSINESS
June 21, 1985 | PAUL RICHTER and TONY ROBINSON, Times Staff Writers
Australian media baron Rupert Murdoch on Thursday sold the Village Voice, New York's combative counterculture weekly, to the owner of pet food maker Hartz Mountain Industries for more than $55 million. Leonard N. Stern, reputedly one of America's richest men, immediately promised that, like Murdoch, he would not try to change the leftist editorial policies of the 30-year-old newspaper.
BUSINESS
October 20, 1994 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Village Voice, New York's oldest and most respected alternative newspaper, said Wednesday it will purchase its younger Los Angeles counterpart, the L.A. Weekly. David Schneiderman, publisher and president of the liberal and opinionated New York weekly, said the owners of the two publications have signed a letter of intent and "intend to close the deal within the next month or so." Schneiderman refused to disclose the price.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1999 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The owner of Stern Publishing, which includes L.A. Weekly, O.C. Weekly and other alternative publications, announced Wednesday that his empire of weekly newspapers is for sale. The chain, begun with the purchase of the Village Voice in New York City from Rupert Murdoch 14 years ago, now has more than 500 employees and annual revenues of more than $80 million. "I am extremely proud of this company, and confident of its future potential," owner Leonard Stern said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Los Angeles Times Alexander Cockburn, the radical and acerbic journalist who had written longtime columns in both the conservative Wall Street Journal and the leftist outlet the Nation, died Friday in Germany. He was 71. The influential writer had been fighting cancer, according to his editor, Katrina vanden Heuvel. Unlike another prominent writer, Christopher Hitchens, with whom he had often been compared, Cockburn did not share the story of his illness. It was a rare quiet move in a career characterized by a thirst for public debate.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2011 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Lucking Out My Life Getting Down and Semi-Dirty in Seventies New York James Wolcott Doubleday: 260 pp., $25.95 James Wolcott, takedown artist extraordinaire, is a byline that sends shivers of schadenfreude up the spines of fellow writers - at least when he's writing about someone else. A literary journalist who blows raspberries at mandarins, he's a mainstay of Vanity Fair's luxurious editorial lineup, his flashy prose outshining those gleaming, Mephistophelean ads peddling fantasies of the lucky one-percenters, his crap-cutting manner adding a bracing machete-whoosh to the magazine's day-spa elevator music.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
John Green, bestselling and prize-winning author of young adult novels including "The Fault In Our Stars" and "Looking for Alaska," gave the commencement address at Butler University on May 11. It's witty, smart, thoughtful, and going viral; if you start hearing people in your life saying "happy birthday, sir," you can thank him. There's a YouTube video of the entire graudation ceremony -- Green begins speaking about an hour in -- and he's...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Los Angeles Times Alexander Cockburn, the radical and acerbic journalist who had written longtime columns in both the conservative Wall Street Journal and the leftist outlet the Nation, died Friday in Germany. He was 71. The influential writer had been fighting cancer, according to his editor, Katrina vanden Heuvel. Unlike another prominent writer, Christopher Hitchens, with whom he had often been compared, Cockburn did not share the story of his illness. It was a rare quiet move in a career characterized by a thirst for public debate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2012 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Film critic Andrew Sarris began his rise to prominence in the early 1960s when, fresh off an extended visit to Paris, he became a primary spokesman for a theory that would reverberate throughout the cinema world. Screenwriters and producers may have thought they wielded the most influence. But Sarris, inspired by what Francois Truffaut had called the "politique des auteurs," introduced to America the controversial notion that, despite the collaborative nature of filmmaking, some directors are the "authors" of their movies and that the best directors, by imbuing a movie with their personal vision, make the best films.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2012
MUSIC When the Village Voice's year-end music poll was topped by the Bay Area-based Tune-Yards (a.k.a. Merrill Garbus), the cries of "Who?" in some circles were deafening. Deserving of an audience beyond true believers and rock critics, the big-voiced Garbus mixes up Afro-pop and folk with an experimenter's ear for chance creation while looping herself on a sampler. Also headlining this stopover between Coachella sets is St. Vincent, whose knotty songs take on more blood and grit live courtesy of the guitar pyrotechnics of mastermind Annie Clark.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2012 | By J. Hoberman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
No one watches a movie in a vacuum. You don't check your real-world baggage at the door — something for which any good critic must account. Several days before catching the new Steven Soderbergh action thriller "Haywire," I learned that Soderbergh had made the movie on the rebound, fired from "Moneyball" on the eve of its shoot. Moreover, he got the idea of starring champion mixed martial arts fighter and glamorous "American Gladiator" ingénue Gina "Crush" Carano in the days after his termination, after watching her televised loss to a rival named Cyborg.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2011 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Lucking Out My Life Getting Down and Semi-Dirty in Seventies New York James Wolcott Doubleday: 260 pp., $25.95 James Wolcott, takedown artist extraordinaire, is a byline that sends shivers of schadenfreude up the spines of fellow writers - at least when he's writing about someone else. A literary journalist who blows raspberries at mandarins, he's a mainstay of Vanity Fair's luxurious editorial lineup, his flashy prose outshining those gleaming, Mephistophelean ads peddling fantasies of the lucky one-percenters, his crap-cutting manner adding a bracing machete-whoosh to the magazine's day-spa elevator music.
BUSINESS
December 7, 1988
Jonathan Z. Larsen has been named editor-in-chief of the Village Voice, New York. Larsen has been an editor and writer with Time, New Times, Runner, Life and Manhattan Inc. magazines.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1992
"I think (Lee) Strasberg ruined more actors than he helped. He set American acting back about 100 years. . . . There is this whole kind of self-indulgent, neurotic belief that somehow the purpose for doing a play for these actors is to work out their private problems. They don't have the sense of serving the script." --Playwright-actor Sam Shepard, in the Village Voice.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2011 | James Rainey
Since their renaissance in the 1960s counterculture, alternative papers have thrived on free-spirited journalism and a libertarian advertising philosophy. Strip clubs, escorts and, lately, medical marijuana emporiums, filled countless pages with their ads. The ads might have provoked occasional scorn but probably never the kind of sustained backlash currently aimed at the nation's largest alternative news publisher by some religious leaders and law enforcement officials. The subject of their wrath has been Village Voice Media's backpage.com, an online classified advertising service that critics say is a too-easy platform for predators intent on offering underage victims for prostitution.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2011 | By James Rainey, Los Angeles Times
LA Weekly Editor Drex Heikes announced Monday that he would step down and the Phoenix-based company that publishes the paper quickly named his replacement — Sarah Fenske, who has been managing editor of the Weekly's sister publication in St. Louis. Heikes, who served for a little more than two years as editor of the alternative paper, told his staff that he was proud of the paper's growing readership in print and online but that he needed a break before pursuing his next venture in journalism.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|