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ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2011 | James Rainey
Since their renaissance in the 1960s counterculture, alternative papers have thrived on free-spirited journalism and a libertarian advertising philosophy. Strip clubs, escorts and, lately, medical marijuana emporiums, filled countless pages with their ads. The ads might have provoked occasional scorn but probably never the kind of sustained backlash currently aimed at the nation's largest alternative news publisher by some religious leaders and law enforcement officials. The subject of their wrath has been Village Voice Media's backpage.com, an online classified advertising service that critics say is a too-easy platform for predators intent on offering underage victims for prostitution.
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NATIONAL
July 30, 2012 | By Matt Pearce
You could say Backpage.com is a page nearly everyone wants to rip out of the Internet, crumple up and throw away. Last week, two legal cases out of Washington state illustrated how the popular website, known for its promotion of adult escort services, has to cling by its nails to the generosity of American law to survive. On Friday, three girls - two 13 and one 15  at the time they ran away from home - filed suit in Pierce County Superior Court against Backpage.com, alleging it allowed them to be bought and sold over the site for sex by the pimps who captured them.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2011 | By James Rainey, Los Angeles Times
LA Weekly Editor Drex Heikes announced Monday that he would step down and the Phoenix-based company that publishes the paper quickly named his replacement — Sarah Fenske, who has been managing editor of the Weekly's sister publication in St. Louis. Heikes, who served for a little more than two years as editor of the alternative paper, told his staff that he was proud of the paper's growing readership in print and online but that he needed a break before pursuing his next venture in journalism.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2011 | James Rainey
Since their renaissance in the 1960s counterculture, alternative papers have thrived on free-spirited journalism and a libertarian advertising philosophy. Strip clubs, escorts and, lately, medical marijuana emporiums, filled countless pages with their ads. The ads might have provoked occasional scorn but probably never the kind of sustained backlash currently aimed at the nation's largest alternative news publisher by some religious leaders and law enforcement officials. The subject of their wrath has been Village Voice Media's backpage.com, an online classified advertising service that critics say is a too-easy platform for predators intent on offering underage victims for prostitution.
BUSINESS
November 29, 2005 | Jube Shiver Jr., Times Staff Writer
In a move uniting two major alternative newspaper chains, government antitrust regulators have cleared the pending merger of New Times Media with Village Voice Media Inc., the owner of LA Weekly, OC Weekly and New York's Village Voice. The Federal Trade Commission posted a notice on its website that it had ended its investigation of the merger. New York-based Village Voice Media owns six weekly urban newspapers, while New Times of Phoenix owns 11.
BUSINESS
January 28, 2003 | P.J. Huffstutter, Times Staff Writer
Alternative newsweekly chains NT Media and Village Voice Media have reached a tentative agreement with the Justice Department that would settle charges that they violated antitrust laws when they agreed to close competing newspapers in Los Angeles and Cleveland. As part of the settlement, the publishers agreed to sell the assets of their shuttered papers within 30 days to new owners, which would revive them. The sales would be monitored by the Justice Department.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2002 | TIM RUTTEN
PROSECUTORS investigating whether the nation's two largest alternative newspaper chains violated federal and state antitrust laws when they closed competing publications in Los Angeles and Cleveland will begin taking sworn testimony in Southern California during the first week of January, according to law enforcement officials and witnesses whose depositions already have been scheduled.
BUSINESS
October 25, 2005 | Geoff Boucher, Times Staff Writer
Three years after packing up and leaving town, New Times announced Monday that it was returning to Los Angeles, buying former rival LA Weekly as part of a deal that would create the nation's largest chain of alternative newspapers. New Times said it was buying Village Voice Media Inc., which also owns New York's celebrated Village Voice, OC Weekly and sister papers in three other markets. Financial terms weren't disclosed.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2009 | Sherry Stern
Drex Heikes, a former editor at the Los Angeles Times and most recently an editor in Las Vegas, has been named the next editor of LA Weekly. Heikes will replace Laurie Ochoa, who was forced to resign earlier this month by executives of Village Voice Media, which publishes the alternative newspaper. Heikes spent 18 years at The Times, including seven as an editor of the Los Angeles Times magazine. In 2005, he joined the Las Vegas Sun as the No. 2 editor. Most recently he assigned and edited the Sun's Pulitzer Prize-winning investigation of the deaths of construction workers.
NATIONAL
July 30, 2012 | By Matt Pearce
You could say Backpage.com is a page nearly everyone wants to rip out of the Internet, crumple up and throw away. Last week, two legal cases out of Washington state illustrated how the popular website, known for its promotion of adult escort services, has to cling by its nails to the generosity of American law to survive. On Friday, three girls - two 13 and one 15  at the time they ran away from home - filed suit in Pierce County Superior Court against Backpage.com, alleging it allowed them to be bought and sold over the site for sex by the pimps who captured them.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2011 | By James Rainey, Los Angeles Times
LA Weekly Editor Drex Heikes announced Monday that he would step down and the Phoenix-based company that publishes the paper quickly named his replacement — Sarah Fenske, who has been managing editor of the Weekly's sister publication in St. Louis. Heikes, who served for a little more than two years as editor of the alternative paper, told his staff that he was proud of the paper's growing readership in print and online but that he needed a break before pursuing his next venture in journalism.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2009 | Sherry Stern
Drex Heikes, a former editor at the Los Angeles Times and most recently an editor in Las Vegas, has been named the next editor of LA Weekly. Heikes will replace Laurie Ochoa, who was forced to resign earlier this month by executives of Village Voice Media, which publishes the alternative newspaper. Heikes spent 18 years at The Times, including seven as an editor of the Los Angeles Times magazine. In 2005, he joined the Las Vegas Sun as the No. 2 editor. Most recently he assigned and edited the Sun's Pulitzer Prize-winning investigation of the deaths of construction workers.
BUSINESS
November 29, 2005 | Jube Shiver Jr., Times Staff Writer
In a move uniting two major alternative newspaper chains, government antitrust regulators have cleared the pending merger of New Times Media with Village Voice Media Inc., the owner of LA Weekly, OC Weekly and New York's Village Voice. The Federal Trade Commission posted a notice on its website that it had ended its investigation of the merger. New York-based Village Voice Media owns six weekly urban newspapers, while New Times of Phoenix owns 11.
BUSINESS
October 25, 2005 | Geoff Boucher, Times Staff Writer
Three years after packing up and leaving town, New Times announced Monday that it was returning to Los Angeles, buying former rival LA Weekly as part of a deal that would create the nation's largest chain of alternative newspapers. New Times said it was buying Village Voice Media Inc., which also owns New York's celebrated Village Voice, OC Weekly and sister papers in three other markets. Financial terms weren't disclosed.
BUSINESS
January 28, 2003 | P.J. Huffstutter, Times Staff Writer
Alternative newsweekly chains NT Media and Village Voice Media have reached a tentative agreement with the Justice Department that would settle charges that they violated antitrust laws when they agreed to close competing newspapers in Los Angeles and Cleveland. As part of the settlement, the publishers agreed to sell the assets of their shuttered papers within 30 days to new owners, which would revive them. The sales would be monitored by the Justice Department.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2002 | TIM RUTTEN
PROSECUTORS investigating whether the nation's two largest alternative newspaper chains violated federal and state antitrust laws when they closed competing publications in Los Angeles and Cleveland will begin taking sworn testimony in Southern California during the first week of January, according to law enforcement officials and witnesses whose depositions already have been scheduled.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2002 | TIM RUTTEN
The U.S. Department of Justice has begun what some legal experts believe is a serious investigation into whether the country's two largest alternative newspaper chains violated federal antitrust laws when they closed competing weeklies in Los Angeles and Cleveland, thereby dividing the markets between them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2007 | From Times Staff Reports
OC Weekly has a new editor -- Ted B. Kissell, former senior editor at the Ventura County Star. Kissell, who starts April 2, fills a vacancy left by the resignation of founding editor Will Swaim, who is launching an alternative paper in Long Beach. A 1990 journalism graduate of Northwestern University, Kissell was a staff writer at Miami New Times and associate editor at New Times Broward-Palm Beach, both alternative papers, according to Village Voice Media, which owns OC Weekly.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2002 | TIM RUTTEN
The U.S. Department of Justice has begun what some legal experts believe is a serious investigation into whether the country's two largest alternative newspaper chains violated federal antitrust laws when they closed competing weeklies in Los Angeles and Cleveland, thereby dividing the markets between them.
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