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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1985 | From United Press International
A Los Angeles judge has dismissed a Texas felony theft case against actor Vince Edwards, best known as television's "Ben Casey," his attorney said Wednesday. Attorney Peter Knecht said Municipal Judge Elva Soper dismissed the case against Edwards, 57, at an extradition hearing Monday. Knecht said the case was dismissed on a motion made by a prosecutor, apparently in part because Edwards had threatened to file suit against authorities for malicious prosecution.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2011 | Susan King
Every fall the broadcast networks unveil their new series -- some will become hits, a lot more will disappear in a nanosecond. The same was true 50 years ago, though the TV universe was a lot smaller. In 1961, there were only three networks -- ABC, NBC and CBS -- and prime-time began at 7:30 p.m. (and 7 on Sundays) instead of 8 as it is now. Five decades ago, the fall season featured the arrival of several popular comedies, medical series, an acclaimed legal drama and even a circus variety show (you don't see much of that on TV anymore)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1996 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vince Edwards, whose portrayal of the brooding, brilliant TV doctor Ben Casey in the 1960s set the standard for many of today's contingent of handsomely troubled television physicians, has died. He was 67. Edwards lost a months-long struggle against pancreatic cancer Monday night at UCLA Medical Center, his family said. He had been hospitalized for the last 11 days. "He was, in life, larger than life," his wife, Janet Edwards, said. "And he loved being Ben Casey up until the end."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2010 | By Sam Adams, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The films in the five-disc set "Columbia Pictures Film Noir Classics II" were released as the movement was nearing its end, and in some the wear has begun to show. Apart from chronology, there's little to tie them together, but there's a common sense of a genre fraying at the seams, which in some cases translates as an opportunity to bust it wide open. Jacques Tourneur's "Nightfall," from 1957, uses multiple time frames to complicate the story of a graphic artist framed for murder and robbery by a pair of hot-tempered thugs.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2011 | Susan King
Every fall the broadcast networks unveil their new series -- some will become hits, a lot more will disappear in a nanosecond. The same was true 50 years ago, though the TV universe was a lot smaller. In 1961, there were only three networks -- ABC, NBC and CBS -- and prime-time began at 7:30 p.m. (and 7 on Sundays) instead of 8 as it is now. Five decades ago, the fall season featured the arrival of several popular comedies, medical series, an acclaimed legal drama and even a circus variety show (you don't see much of that on TV anymore)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2010 | By Sam Adams, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The films in the five-disc set "Columbia Pictures Film Noir Classics II" were released as the movement was nearing its end, and in some the wear has begun to show. Apart from chronology, there's little to tie them together, but there's a common sense of a genre fraying at the seams, which in some cases translates as an opportunity to bust it wide open. Jacques Tourneur's "Nightfall," from 1957, uses multiple time frames to complicate the story of a graphic artist framed for murder and robbery by a pair of hot-tempered thugs.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1987
Excerpt from Daily Variety's review of "Return to Horror High": "In one scene, (Vince) Edwards is nailed to the ground while the killer dissects him, but it's more for laughs."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Vince Edwards will reprise his role as the idealistic doctor in "The Return of Ben Casey," a two-hour television movie scheduled to air in syndication sometime during the upcoming season. More than 20 years have passed since Ben Casey left County Hospital (the original series aired from 1961 through 1966), and Casey returns as chief of neurosurgery to find a new staff of dedicated young doctors and nurses. Also reprising their roles from the series are Harry Landers (Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2006 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Bettye Ackerman, who played Dr. Maggie Graham on the popular "Ben Casey" medical series in the 1960s and was the widow of Sam Jaffe, has died. She was 82. Ackerman died Nov. 1 at her home in Columbia, S.C., after having a stroke Oct. 28, said her brother, Robert Ackerman. She was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease a few years after selling her home in Beverly Hills in 1998 and moving to Columbia to be near family members, he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1996 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vince Edwards, whose portrayal of the brooding, brilliant TV doctor Ben Casey in the 1960s set the standard for many of today's contingent of handsomely troubled television physicians, has died. He was 67. Edwards lost a months-long struggle against pancreatic cancer Monday night at UCLA Medical Center, his family said. He had been hospitalized for the last 11 days. "He was, in life, larger than life," his wife, Janet Edwards, said. "And he loved being Ben Casey up until the end."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1985 | From United Press International
A Los Angeles judge has dismissed a Texas felony theft case against actor Vince Edwards, best known as television's "Ben Casey," his attorney said Wednesday. Attorney Peter Knecht said Municipal Judge Elva Soper dismissed the case against Edwards, 57, at an extradition hearing Monday. Knecht said the case was dismissed on a motion made by a prosecutor, apparently in part because Edwards had threatened to file suit against authorities for malicious prosecution.
NEWS
June 28, 1990 | DOUG LIST
Most everyone has seen the precise, epic-like sweep of Stanley Kubrick's direction in "Dr. Strangelove," "2001," "A Clockwork Orange," "The Shining" and/or "Full Metal Jacket." As a young filmmaker in the 1950s, though, Kubrick was attuned to the gritty, low-budget film noir thriller technique epitomized in "The Killing," recently released on video.
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