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July 22, 1993 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER. Times staff writer Ronald J. Ostrow contributed to this story
President Clinton has ordered a top-level Justice Department investigation into the apparent suicide Tuesday evening of his childhood friend and White House deputy counsel, Vince Foster. White House officials described Foster's death by gunshot as "inexplicable" but said that they have no reason to believe it was other than a suicide. However, his White House office was quickly sealed and will be searched by federal agents this morning for any material that might bear on his death.
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NEWS
June 26, 1998 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rebuffing independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr, the Supreme Court upheld the traditional privilege of confidentiality between lawyers and their clients Thursday and threw out his demand for notes taken by a lawyer for the late White House Deputy Counsel Vincent Foster. The shield of privacy between a lawyer and a client "is one of the oldest recognized privileges" in the law, said Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist.
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NEWS
July 23, 1993 | PAUL RICHTER and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As President Clinton prepared to attend today's funeral of lifelong friend Vince Foster, investigators completed their preliminary search of the former deputy counsel's White House office without turning up any clues that would help solve the mystery of his apparent suicide. Investigators pored over the personal and official documents in Foster's West Wing office and interviewed White House officials about the death, which was discovered Tuesday when U.S.
NEWS
June 9, 1998 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every day, thousands of Americans talk over problems with a doctor, a priest, a psychotherapist or a lawyer. These special conversations have been protected as confidential, not just by tradition but by law. On Monday, the Supreme Court considered a plea from independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr that the lawyer-client privilege be waived in the case of former White House Deputy Counsel Vincent Foster because he is dead.
NEWS
July 31, 1995 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In their effort to shield President Clinton from allegations of obstruction of justice, Democrats on the Senate Whitewater investigating committee are invoking the well-worn stereotype of the pushy New York lawyer to explain the actions of former White House Counsel Bernard Nussbaum.
NEWS
July 28, 1996 | SUSAN SCHMIDT, WASHINGTON POST
"No time to explain. This is a crisis. I'm in Little Rock completing my investigation of the murder of Vince Foster. I need your help." That scrawled note on Holiday Inn stationery two months ago was another reminder to 86-year-old Aileen West of McMinnville, Ore., that the intrepid Ronald Wilcox is still on the Foster case. Wilcox had written her earlier about death threats and a dramatic meeting with Hillary Rodham Clinton.
NEWS
August 9, 1995 | DAVID G. SAVAGE and EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A federal bank examiner who looked into the failure of an Arkansas savings and loan owned by a former business partner of President Clinton told a House committee Tuesday that she was removed from her job because she aggressively urged a criminal investigation of those involved. "We uncovered rampant bank fraud, including check kiting," Jean Lewis, a Kansas City-based investigator for the Resolution Trust Corp., said of her examination of old check stubs from the Madison Guaranty Savings & Loan.
NEWS
June 10, 1995 | From Associated Press
Nationally known forensic scientist Henry C. Lee is helping Whitewater prosecutors by reviewing the 1993 death of White House lawyer Vincent Foster. Lee, whose expertise has been sought in prominent trials, such as the O.J. Simpson case, said Friday that he agreed to review the prosecutors' investigatory reports about Foster's July, 1993, death to determine if they support the original finding of suicide.
NEWS
June 9, 1998 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every day, thousands of Americans talk over problems with a doctor, a priest, a psychotherapist or a lawyer. These special conversations have been protected as confidential, not just by tradition but by law. On Monday, the Supreme Court considered a plea from independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr that the lawyer-client privilege be waived in the case of former White House Deputy Counsel Vincent Foster because he is dead.
NEWS
August 16, 1996 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
White House aides closely monitored congressional investigations into Whitewater-related matters and carefully planned strategy to counter the inquiries, according to 2,000 pages of internal memos and confidential notes made public Thursday by the White House. The documents show presidential aides fretted in particular over congressional scrutiny of the handling of Deputy White House Counsel Vincent Foster's files after his suicide.
NEWS
March 31, 1998 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court dealt a setback Monday to independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr by agreeing to hear a lawyer's challenge to one of Starr's many subpoenas for private notes. The court said it will rule early next year on whether a lawyer who consulted with former Clinton aide Vincent Foster just nine days before Foster's suicide can keep their conversation confidential.
NEWS
February 19, 1998 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Does the attorney-client privilege of confidentiality die when the client dies? Independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr, who is seeking notes from an attorney consulted by the late Deputy White House Counsel Vincent Foster, says that it does.
NEWS
October 11, 1997 | RONALD J. OSTROW and ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Deputy White House Counsel Vincent Foster, depressed in the days shortly before his 1993 suicide, cried at dinner with his wife, sought legal advice from attorneys and told his mother that he was unhappy because work was "a grind." That poignant portrait of Foster is sketched in a newly issued report by independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr, who concluded that the longtime friend of Bill and Hillary Rodham Clinton took his own life.
NEWS
August 30, 1997 | TONI LOCY, THE WASHINGTON POST
A private attorney for the late Vincent Foster, the deputy White House counsel who committed suicide in July 1993, will have to give an independent counsel some of his notes from a conversation he had with Foster about the firings of White House travel office employees, a federal appeals court panel ruled Friday. In a 2-1 decision, the panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C.
NEWS
July 16, 1997 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr announced Tuesday that he has concluded that White House Deputy Counsel Vincent Foster committed suicide in 1993, officially resolving a controversy over a death that some opponents of President Clinton had labeled a murder. In a forceful statement, Starr said his findings were "based on investigation, analysis and review of the evidence by experts and experienced investigators and prosecutors."
NEWS
February 23, 1997 | JACK NELSON, CHIEF WASHINGTON CORRESPONDENT
Whitewater independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr has completed a voluminous report that, sources say, refutes claims by right-wing organizations that presidential aide Vincent Foster was the victim of a murder and that President Clinton and his wife, Hillary, tried to cover it up. Running to more than 100 pages, the report rests on an exhaustive inquiry into the events surrounding Foster's July 1993 death by handgun and was completed only recently, sources said.
NEWS
March 29, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Keeping the investigation of Vincent Foster's death open, Whitewater prosecutors are bringing in an assistant U.S. attorney, Steve Parker of Tennessee, to review the evidence. The protege of deputy Whitewater prosecutor Hickman Ewing will join the office that launched an investigation in the fall of 1994 into how the deputy White House counsel died. Two previous investigations concluded that Foster committed suicide, but independent counsel Kenneth W.
NEWS
May 15, 1996 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A short time before his suicide, Deputy White House Counsel Vincent Foster voiced concern that another presidential aide might accuse First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton of improprieties in the White House travel office fiasco, the Senate Whitewater Committee was told Tuesday. New York attorney Susan Thomases, a longtime confidante of Mrs. Clinton, said that Foster told her about his worries days before he took his life in July 1993.
NEWS
November 12, 1996 | Associated Press
A witness in the Vincent Foster case is suing the government for $1.5 million, alleging two FBI agents and 26 other people conspired to discourage him from testifying about what he saw on the day the deputy White House counsel died. Patrick Knowlton says the FBI falsified information he gave them and that he was harassed by people who followed him after his account in the Foster case became public. The lawsuit, filed Oct. 25 in U.S.
NEWS
August 16, 1996 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
White House aides closely monitored congressional investigations into Whitewater-related matters and carefully planned strategy to counter the inquiries, according to 2,000 pages of internal memos and confidential notes made public Thursday by the White House. The documents show presidential aides fretted in particular over congressional scrutiny of the handling of Deputy White House Counsel Vincent Foster's files after his suicide.
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