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Vince Fudzie

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SPORTS
December 9, 1992 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By exposing improper inducements, Vince Fudzie, a former University of Washington linebacker, realizes it might hurt those who still are enjoying the benefits of being major college football players. "Guys on the team will be upset," Fudzie said. "They'll have to go to work now. (But) they need to teach them how to make money, not just give them money. "When you look at it, I don't know any kid who has gotten rich working from a summer job . . .
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SPORTS
December 9, 1992 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By exposing improper inducements, Vince Fudzie, a former University of Washington linebacker, realizes it might hurt those who still are enjoying the benefits of being major college football players. "Guys on the team will be upset," Fudzie said. "They'll have to go to work now. (But) they need to teach them how to make money, not just give them money. "When you look at it, I don't know any kid who has gotten rich working from a summer job . . .
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SPORTS
April 23, 2002 | Lonnie White
A consumer's guide to the best and worst of sports media and merchandise. Ground rules: If it can be read, played, heard, observed, worn, viewed, dialed or downloaded, it's in play here. One exception: No products will be endorsed: What: "Your Brain Is a Muscle Too: How Student Athletes Succeed in College and in Life" Authors: Vince Fudzie and Andre N.
SPORTS
December 20, 1992 | DANNY ROBBINS and ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The son-in-law of Washington football Coach Don James offered to pay a former Husky player $500 if the former player would recant published remarks alleging impropriety in James' program. James' son-in-law, Jim Heckman, left a series of recorded telephone messages for former Washington tailback Vince Weathersby seeking a statement from Weathersby about stories that appeared in The Times on Dec. 9.
SPORTS
January 8, 1996 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last April, Arkansas basketball star Corliss Williamson returned home from the money-making Final Four in Seattle to find his electricity had been turned off because he could not afford to pay the utility bill. He is not alone among major college athletes. "We're lucky to get a scholarship, but once we get here, what do we do?" Donnie Edwards, a UCLA linebacker, said in October. "The money we get is not enough to even live on, especially in Westwood."
SPORTS
December 9, 1992 | DANNY ROBBINS and ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some University of Washington boosters have engaged in a longstanding practice of providing Husky football players with thousands of dollars in cash and other improper benefits, including summer jobs requiring little or no work, a Times investigation shows.
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