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Vincennes Ship

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NEWS
March 11, 1989 | LEONARD BERNSTEIN and RICHARD A. SERRANO, Times Staff Writers
The wife of Capt. Will Rogers III, skipper of the San Diego-based Vincennes, escaped unharmed Friday morning moments before a pipe bomb exploded under her van, igniting a fire that gutted her vehicle at a busy La Jolla intersection. Hours after the 7:40 a.m. explosion, the FBI took control of the investigation, suspecting that the bombing might be an act of "domestic terrorism" linked to the Vincennes' accidental downing of an Iranian civilian airliner in the Persian Gulf last July, killing 290.
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NEWS
July 22, 1992 | From a Times Staff Writer
The former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff on Tuesday denied charges that the United States was trying to provoke attacks from Iranian gunboats as part of a "secret war" when the Navy cruiser Vincennes accidentally shot down an Iranian commercial airliner in July, 1988. Testifying before the House Armed Services Committee, Adm. William J. Crowe Jr.
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NEWS
July 6, 1988 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
A high-level U.S. Navy team arrived in the Persian Gulf on Tuesday to investigate the circumstances of the shooting down of an Iranian airliner, even as Tehran toned down its anti-American rhetoric in an apparent effort to reap full propaganda benefits from the tragedy. In remarks carried by Iran's official news agency, the country's leader, the Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, cautioned those calling the loudest for revenge.
NEWS
July 4, 1992 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee has called for a Pentagon investigation into whether Congress was misled by the official account of the downing of an Iranian commercial airliner by a Navy cruiser four years ago. Sen. Sam Nunn (D-Ga.) is asking the Pentagon to determine whether the shooting down of the passenger jet occurred during covert operations by the Navy designed to provoke Iranian attacks as part of a U.S. effort to assist Iraq in the final stages of the Iran-Iraq War.
NEWS
July 4, 1988 | From a Times Staff Writer
Here is a chronology of major military events in the Persian Gulf naval warfare that have involved the United States: Sept. 22, 1980--After months of minor border clashes, the Iran-Iraq War begins. U.S. proclaims neutrality but says that oil must keep flowing through the gulf. Dec. 10, 1986--Kuwait asks U.S. protection against Iranian attacks on its oil tankers in the Persian Gulf through a controversial re-flagging program.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 1988 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
It was Monday morning, the day after the U.S. warship Vincennes shot down an Iranian jetliner with 290 passengers and crew in a Persian Gulf incident of potential global scale. And sportscaster Jim Lampley was covering it. Lampley, who had been covering the Wimbledon tennis tournament in London, was in New York substituting for Harry Smith, co-hosting "CBS This Morning" with Kathleen Sullivan and getting his share of interviews on this complex and volatile story.
NEWS
July 4, 1988 | JOHN M. BRODER and MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writers
A U.S. warship, mistaking a commercial Iranian airliner for a warplane, shot the jet down during a naval skirmish in the Persian Gulf on Sunday. Officials in Tehran said that 290 passengers and crew aboard Iran Air Flight 655 were killed. President Reagan said officers aboard the American guided missile cruiser Vincennes, which was battling with several Iranian gunboats, believed the jetliner was an attacking Iranian F-14 fighter and fired two surface-to-air missiles at it at 10:54 a.m.
NEWS
July 4, 1988 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
The downing of an Iranian airliner over the Persian Gulf on Sunday brought to mind the incident five years ago in which the Soviet Union shot down an unarmed Korean airliner, killing all 269 aboard. In both incidents, Washington and Moscow insisted they had acted properly in self-defense and both insisted that the doomed planes ignored warning signals and were out of their assigned air corridors. But in contrast to the hours of Soviet tracking of the Korean Air Flight 007 on Sept.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1988 | SALLY SQUIRES, Squires is a medical writer for the Washington Post health section, from which this is reprinted
The increasing use of sophisticated automation is threatening to overwhelm airline pilots, naval crews and others who deal with high technology in stressful situations. Psychologists call it the "glass cockpit" syndrome--referring to the ubiquitous glass computer screens. It is a situation where the combination of a flood of technical information, faulty communication among crew members and outside stress lead to major judgment errors that can cause accidents.
NEWS
July 5, 1988 | MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writer
An Iran Air pilot who flew an Airbus on the same route as the ill-fated Flight 655 for more than two years said Monday that the plane shot down by a U.S. warship could not possibly have been flying at more than 500 miles an hour, as U.S. officials have said it was. Mahmoud Vaziri, who left Iran last fall and now lives in Glendale, Calif.
NEWS
March 7, 1991 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Authorities have shelved an investigation into the bombing of a van belonging to Navy Capt. Will Rogers III, former skipper of the guided missile cruiser Vincennes, and have all but ruled out the possibility that terrorists planted the bomb two years ago, sources have told The Times. Sources in Washington and California said investigators remain unable to develop a lead solid enough to support charges in the bombing.
BUSINESS
July 9, 1990 | From United Press International
General Dynamics Sued Over Vincennes: The suit was filed Monday against General Dynamics Inc. by 12 relatives of an Iranian couple who were among the 290 killed when a guided missile from the USS Vincennes downed an Iranian Airbus over the Persian Gulf in July, 1988. The U.S. District Court case, filed in Los Angeles, alleges El Segundo-based General Dynamics made and sold defective radar equipment, causing commercial Flight 655 to be "misidentified on the radar screen as military and hostile."
NEWS
October 1, 1989 | RICHARD A. SERRANO and ALAN ABRAHAMSON, Times Staff Writers
Federal investigators probing the bombing last March of a van driven by the wife of the skipper of the Navy guided missile cruiser Vincennes have turned their attention away from international terrorism and toward an American believed to have a personal grudge against the captain, The Times has learned. The bombing drew national attention because of the possibility that it was terrorist retribution for the mistaken downing of an Iranian commercial jetliner by the Vincennes, commanded by Capt.
NEWS
September 2, 1989 | From United Press International
A Navy commander, engaging in unusually frank public criticism, said the U.S. warship Vincennes that shot down an Iranian airliner, killing 290 people, had been given the derogatory nickname "Robo Cruiser" for its aggressive behavior. Cmdr. David R. Carlson of the frigate Sides, which was in the Persian Gulf at the time of the July 3, 1988, downing, wrote in the September issue of the U.S. Naval Institute magazine Proceedings that the aggressiveness of the Vincennes, commanded by Capt.
NEWS
July 22, 1989 | From Reuters
Iran's top aviation official said Friday that U.S. offers of compensation for the Airbus tragedy could be considered only after the World Court had censured Washington for shooting down the plane. The Iranian news agency IRNA quoted Mohammed Nabi Habibi, head of the Civil Aviation Organization, as saying Iran is determined to pursue the case filed in May at the Court of International Justice "to bring the United States to justice."
NEWS
July 18, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
The Bush Administration said Monday that it has begun discussions with India, Italy, Pakistan, Yugoslavia and the United Arab Emirates to arrange compensation payments for the deaths of the 40 non-Iranians killed when a U.S. warship shot down an Iranian civilian airliner last year.
NEWS
July 5, 1988 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
The captain of the U.S. warship Vincennes, which mistakenly shot down an Iranian jetliner Sunday, killing all 290 aboard, said Monday that his action was legitimate self-defense but called the tragedy "a burden I will carry the rest of my life." "I believed the aircraft to be a definite threat to this unit and operating in direct response to the ongoing surface engagement," Capt. Will C. Rogers III wrote in a message to his superiors.
BUSINESS
July 9, 1990 | From United Press International
General Dynamics Sued Over Vincennes: The suit was filed Monday against General Dynamics Inc. by 12 relatives of an Iranian couple who were among the 290 killed when a guided missile from the USS Vincennes downed an Iranian Airbus over the Persian Gulf in July, 1988. The U.S. District Court case, filed in Los Angeles, alleges El Segundo-based General Dynamics made and sold defective radar equipment, causing commercial Flight 655 to be "misidentified on the radar screen as military and hostile."
NEWS
March 22, 1989 | JANE FRITSCH and RICHARD A. SERRANO, Times Staff Writers
Sharon Rogers wanted to stay on in her job as a teacher at the La Jolla Country Day School after a bomb blast destroyed her van on the way to work, but was fired by school officials in what was announced as a "mutual decision," according to sources who have spoken with her and her husband, Capt. Will C. Rogers III, commander of the guided missile cruiser Vincennes.
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