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SPORTS
July 31, 1992 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles federal court jury found the former business managers of jockeys Laffit Pincay and Chris McCarron guilty Thursday on all seven counts of fraud and related charges. Pincay and McCarron, both of whom are in the Racing Hall of Fame, sued Vincent Andrews and his brother, Robert, alleging that they had improperly invested money the jockeys had earned riding horses. Attorneys for the Andrews brothers argued that Pincay and McCarron had approved the investments.
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SPORTS
July 20, 2002 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge in Los Angeles has awarded jockey Laffit Pincay and recently retired rider Chris McCarron almost $9 million in compensatory and punitive damages stemming from a lawsuit they brought against their former business managers more than 10 years ago. Judge William Matthew Byrne Jr. ordered the Vincent Andrews Management Corp., which has an office in New York, to pay Pincay $5,758,253 and McCarron $3,074,809.
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SPORTS
July 20, 2002 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge in Los Angeles has awarded jockey Laffit Pincay and recently retired rider Chris McCarron almost $9 million in compensatory and punitive damages stemming from a lawsuit they brought against their former business managers more than 10 years ago. Judge William Matthew Byrne Jr. ordered the Vincent Andrews Management Corp., which has an office in New York, to pay Pincay $5,758,253 and McCarron $3,074,809.
SPORTS
July 31, 1992 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles federal court jury found the former business managers of jockeys Laffit Pincay and Chris McCarron guilty Thursday on all seven counts of fraud and related charges. Pincay and McCarron, both of whom are in the Racing Hall of Fame, sued Vincent Andrews and his brother, Robert, alleging that they had improperly invested money the jockeys had earned riding horses. Attorneys for the Andrews brothers argued that Pincay and McCarron had approved the investments.
SPORTS
July 15, 1992 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jockeys Laffit Pincay and Chris McCarron, testifying in federal court in Los Angeles about their former business manager, said Tuesday that they would not have approved numerous investments if they had known that the deals were being made with overlapping companies. The Hall of Fame jockeys are suing the Andrews Management Corp., which invested $1.69 million on behalf of Pincay over a 19-year period and $759,000 for McCarron over nine years.
SPORTS
July 14, 1992 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A jury heard opening statements from attorneys Monday in a lawsuit filed by Hall of Fame jockeys Laffit Pincay and Chris McCarron against a financial- management group that they allege overspent millions of their investment dollars. McCarron skipped riding at Hollywood Park to attend the opening of the trial before U.S. Judge William Matthew Byrne Jr. McCarron also is not scheduled to ride at Hollywood Park on Wednesday.
SPORTS
October 1, 1992 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal court jury in Los Angeles awarded Laffit Pincay and Chris McCarron about $4.5 million in compensatory and punitive damages Wednesday in the jockeys' lawsuit against their former business managers. After deliberating for a day and a half, the jury awarded Pincay $2.9 million, $2.25 million of which was punitive damages. McCarron's award of $1.5 million included $1.27 million in punitive damages.
SPORTS
February 7, 2001 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Kentucky football Coach Hal Mumme resigned Tuesday after months of investigation into possible NCAA violations. Mumme was replaced by Guy Morriss, an assistant coach at Kentucky with more than 15 years of NFL playing and coaching experience. Morriss was given a one-year contract, Athletic Director Larry Ivy said at a news conference in Lexington, Ky. "I met with Coach Hal Mumme this afternoon and officially accepted his resignation as head football coach," Ivy said.
SPORTS
April 29, 1994 | BILL CHRISTINE
An attorney for jockey Gary Stevens charged this week that his client has been bilked out of more than $350,000 by his former financial adviser. Neil Papiano, who represents Stevens, said the jockey is suing Harvey Cohen, an attorney who raced the stakes-winning Music Merci, for actual and punitive damages over pension and investment plans that disappeared. "There's at least $350,000 involved," Papiano said. "All the money that Gary put up is gone.
SPORTS
July 15, 1992 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jockeys Laffit Pincay and Chris McCarron, testifying in federal court in Los Angeles about their former business manager, said Tuesday that they would not have approved numerous investments if they had known that the deals were being made with overlapping companies. The Hall of Fame jockeys are suing the Andrews Management Corp., which invested $1.69 million on behalf of Pincay over a 19-year period and $759,000 for McCarron over nine years.
SPORTS
July 14, 1992 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A jury heard opening statements from attorneys Monday in a lawsuit filed by Hall of Fame jockeys Laffit Pincay and Chris McCarron against a financial- management group that they allege overspent millions of their investment dollars. McCarron skipped riding at Hollywood Park to attend the opening of the trial before U.S. Judge William Matthew Byrne Jr. McCarron also is not scheduled to ride at Hollywood Park on Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1997 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The largest Christmas party in town had something in common with the smallest on Sunday as people around Los Angeles stopped what they were doing to help feed the poor and give toys to needy children. Hundreds of volunteers descended on downtown's skid row to distribute toys, groceries and Christmas trees to about 7,000 people who lined up for blocks outside the Fred Jordan Mission.
MAGAZINE
February 7, 1988 | BILL SHOEMAKER and BARNEY NAGLER, Adapted from "Shoemaker," by William Shoemaker and Barney Nagler. The Doubleday book will be published in April, 1988. Copyright 1988 by William Shoemaker and Barney Nagler.
At age 56, Bill Shoemaker is competing in his 40th year as a professional athlete. His 8,725 victories (as of Jan. 16, 1988) make him the winningest jockey of all time. Of the races he has won, 986 were stakes races, and 246 of those were worth $100,000 or more. The total purse money (through Dec. 27, 1987) won by the horses he has ridden is almost $118 million. How long can Shoemaker continue racing?
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