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Vincent Bo Jackson

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SPORTS
April 5, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Bo Jackson underwent his much-anticipated hip replacement surgery Saturday, and both he and his doctors said they were satisfied after the operation. Whether there is any chance that the procedure can save his baseball career will be uncertain for a long time. Doctors who performed the surgery at Palos Community Hospital southwest of Chicago said the operation went smoothly. Jackson, 29, will be hospitalized for a few days.
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SPORTS
April 5, 1995 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the fall of 1987, Raider executive Al LoCasale and defensive back Mike Haynes were standing on the sideline at the club's training headquarters in El Segundo, engaged in a friendly argument over who was the fastest man in team history. Suddenly, their conversation was interrupted by a 6-foot-1, 234-pound blur whizzing past them. "Now," Haynes said, "the argument is, who is the second-fastest."
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SPORTS
February 1, 1994 | MIKE DOWNEY
From one-handed pitchers to one-hipped outfielders, everyone is welcome with the California Angels. Becoming something of a foster home for unwanted baseball orphans, the Angels are now the temporary guardians of Vincent (Bo) Jackson, a man made of flesh, blood and plastic, who evidently had nowhere else to go after the heartless Chicago White Sox transformed him into Soxless Bo.
SPORTS
October 1, 1994 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bo Jackson, who contemplated retirement this year, said Friday he has decided to return for at least one baseball season. "To be honest, all my intentions are to come back next year and play," Jackson said from his home in Burr Ridge, Ill. "I would love to come back with the Angels. If something better comes up, I'll have to look at my options. "But if I'm healthy, I'll be back. The Angels, who spurned an offer in August to trade Jackson to the Cleveland Indians, were delighted with the news.
SPORTS
October 30, 1990 | RANDY HARVEY
With nothing to occupy his time between football and baseball seasons, one of Willie Gault's Raider teammates--guess which one--wrote in his recently published autobiography that he intends to try bobsledding. In "Bo Knows Bo," Bo Jackson wrote: "I can fit it in between the Super Bowl and spring training. I think, with my speed and strength, I could be the best bobsled pusher ever. I think my team could be the first ever to get a speeding ticket. And I love speed."
SPORTS
March 30, 1988 | MARK HEISLER, Times Staff Writer
Oh no, it can't be happening again, except that it is. Did the people who employ Bo Jackson in his summer job tell our hero that he was bound for the bushes and had better pare his lifework down to a single occupation? Well, silly them. Silly everyone. When will we ever learn? So what if he hit .181 and struck out in 41% of his at-bats after the All-Star game last season? Like, does anyone still care that he passed up the instructional league for the Raiders, who paid better?
SPORTS
March 21, 1991 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Severe pain and an inability to perform the quick motions of professional baseball and football are the main reasons Bo Jackson's hip injury might end his athletic career. Jackson sustained a fracture-dislocation of the left hip on Jan. 13 in a Raider playoff game. A chip of bone was knocked off the acetabulum, the cup-shaped bone that forms the hip socket. The dislocated bone popped back into place on its own. Surgery was not required.
BUSINESS
July 24, 1990 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
"I met a subliminal advertising executive today," comedian Steven Wright deadpanned in a recent monologue. "It was just for a second." These days, comedians aren't the only ones poking fun at subliminal advertisements--hidden commercial messages. Several big advertisers, including Seagram's and Schweppes, recently decided to make a mockery of the topic in separate offbeat campaigns.
SPORTS
October 31, 1989 | MIKE DOWNEY
Mike doesn't know Bo, but Mike does know that Bo is one wonderful individual. In fact, the more Mike thought about Bo, the more inspired he became. Figuring that he, too, could hold down two jobs at once--sportswriter and songwriter--Mike began to hum the melody to "Mr. Bojangles" in his head, until eventually he came up with some substitute lyrics. I met a man, Bo Jackson, and he plays for you, in worn-out shoes. Silver hat and black shirt and baggy pants, he runs right through. Mr.
SPORTS
March 19, 1991 | ROSS NEWHAN
This is not an attempt to add insult to injury. Nor are we suggesting that it was the pivotal factor in the Kansas City Royals' stunning decision to release Bo Jackson. The likelihood is that there wasn't only one pivotal factor, a hidden agenda behind the gloomy medical reports and attempt to save five-sixths of Jackson's $2.4-million salary. The physical and fiscal factors were obviously significant, but it should be known that the Kansas City decision didn't start and stop with the obvious.
SPORTS
September 23, 1994 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Angel sluggers Bo Jackson and Chili Davis, each of whom could become free agents, will explore the possibility of playing in Japan next season, according to their agents. "In a weird way, it may be advantageous to be a free agent this year," said Arn Tellem, Jackson's agent. "If you don't have a contract with one club, it gives you the opportunity to go overseas to make a living. We'll consider all options.
SPORTS
July 21, 1994 | MIKE REILLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's not often that Angel third baseman Spike Owen and outfielder Bo Jackson open the morning paper to find a three-for-four night next to their names in the box score. Today, they will. Jackson was three for four with a home run and Owen added three hits, two runs batted in and two runs scored as the Angels beat the Boston Red Sox, 8-4, Wednesday night at Anaheim Stadium.
SPORTS
June 20, 1994 | BOB NIGHTENGALE
Angel left fielder Bo Jackson says that although he has pondered retirement at the season's conclusion, he probably will not finalize a decision until the winter. "Politics have screwed this game up," Jackson said, "and I get sick of all the political bull. . . . You just get tired of it. If I do retire, I'll just be the bus driver for my kids each morning to school."
SPORTS
April 4, 1994
Bo Jackson, considered the greatest athlete of our generation, might also be one of the most misunderstood. Visitors rarely are allowed to intrude his privacy. The public knows him only by his commercials and exploits on the playing field. The media doesn't know him much better. It has been nine years since he won the Heisman Trophy, five years since he was in the All-Star game, and four years since he last carried a football for the Raiders. America remains intrigued.
SPORTS
March 14, 1994 | BOB NIGHTENGALE
It couldn't be happening, but there it was, right before their very eyes. Bo Jackson, brought to the Angels to be a part-time player and big-time gate attraction, suddenly is creating havoc with their plans. Jackson not only has earned a job on the Angels' opening-day roster with his spring-training performance, but he has forced the Angels to at least consider the prospect of putting him in the everyday lineup.
SPORTS
March 1, 1994 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Angel first baseman J.T. Snow casually gazed across the room, and gasped. His face flushed, he quickly lowered his head before anyone could notice. You're not supposed to care about such things when you are a ballplayer. Still, he had to share this discovery with someone else, so he leaned over and whispered to teammate Kevin Flora. "Flo, turn around and look at Bo," he said. "I mean, will you look at that. My God, look at that body!"
SPORTS
June 20, 1994 | BOB NIGHTENGALE
Angel left fielder Bo Jackson says that although he has pondered retirement at the season's conclusion, he probably will not finalize a decision until the winter. "Politics have screwed this game up," Jackson said, "and I get sick of all the political bull. . . . You just get tired of it. If I do retire, I'll just be the bus driver for my kids each morning to school."
SPORTS
February 1, 1994 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was designed to be a news conference, but the moment he walked through the door Monday afternoon, the Angels knew their entire image suddenly had changed. It has been years since they had this feeling, but for the first time since the Angels last had a Jackson on the field, they now have an identity. Reggie was the one responsible for delivering glamour and sex appeal to the Angels. Now, Bo is bringing it back.
NEWS
February 25, 1994 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bo Jackson kept stealing glances at the clock in the Angel clubhouse Thursday morning until, able to wait no longer, he walked toward 92-year-old coach Jimmie Reese. "It's time, Jimmie. You ready?" Jimmie nodded, and Bo offered his right arm as if he were escorting him to the senior prom. "I've been waiting for this all winter, Jimmie," Jackson said. Reese: "Kid, I've been waiting for this all my life."
SPORTS
February 2, 1994 | MIKE PENNER
A tale of two left fielders, both from Chicago, both cast-adrift free agents, both signed by the Angels within the last three days: Left fielder A has a career batting average of .285. Left fielder B has a career batting average of .247. Left fielder A hit .300 last season. Left fielder B hit .232 last season. Left fielder A had 11 home runs, 35 RBIs, 17 doubles and eight stolen bases last season. Left fielder B had 16 home runs, 45 RBIs, nine doubles and zero stolen bases last season.
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