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Vincent Bugliosi

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OPINION
April 22, 2011
Bugliosi and God Re "Former L.A. County prosecutor challenges God," April 17 Vincent Bugliosi expresses incredulity at the goodness, omnipotence and omniscience of the Christian God. The Manson prosecutor repeats the age-old "God is mean because we die or suffer" argument. As a lawyer and a believer, I note with curiosity and some sadness how many brilliant lawyers can reach opposite conclusions based on the same facts. Christians observe evil and pain and see the gift of free will, redemption and eternity.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
For a few years after seeing Oliver Stone's 1991 political thriller "JFK," I was an assassination buff. I bought one of the books on which the film was based: “On the Trail of the Assassins” by Jim Garrison. I reread “Libra,” Don DeLillo's masterful 1988 novel, in which Lee Harvey Oswald, assorted New Orleans spies and underworld figures conspire to kill the president. The assassination is the greatest mystery of our times, and in those books I found clues that left me feeling tantalizingly close to solving it. But 20 years ago I was cured of my conspiracy-theory fever forever.
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NEWS
February 16, 1992 | SUSAN KING, TV Times Staff Writer
As a prosecutor for the Los Angeles District Attorney's office for eight years, Vincent Bugliosi tried nearly 1,000 felony and misdemeanor cases, losing just one of his 106 felony jury trials. His most famous trial was the Charles Manson case, which became the basis of his best-selling book "Helter Skelter" and the subsequent 1976 TV movie of the same name.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2013 | David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Early in Jeff Guinn's "Manson: The Life and Times of Charles Manson," the first full biography of the infamous mass killer, there's a moment of unexpected and discomforting empathy. It's 1939, and Manson - 5 years old, living with relatives in West Virginia while his mother is in state prison for armed robbery - has embarrassed himself by crying in a first-grade class. To toughen him up, his uncle takes one of his daughter's dresses and orders the boy to wear it to school. "Maybe his mother and Uncle Luther were bad influences," Guinn writes, "but Charlie could benefit from Uncle Bill's intercession.
BOOKS
February 17, 1991 | Dan Byrne, Byrne, a former news editor at The Times, has sailed single-handedly to Hawaii and around the world. He publishes Alone, an international newsletter on solo sailing
The prosecution argued that four minus two equals two. Former Los Angeles prosecutor Vincent Bugliosi argued for the defense that four minus two equal one. The jury went with Bugliosi's arithmetic. The verdict ended a murder trial, but not the mystery that began on Oct. 28, 1974, when a beautiful wooden ketch sailed into Honolulu with two persons on board. The trouble was that they were the wrong two persons.
BOOKS
July 7, 1996 | Gerald Petievich, Gerald Petievich, author of "To Live and Die in L.A.," is working on a novel based within the ranks of the Los Angeles Police Department
After watching the entire televised O.J. Simpson murder trial, I didn't believe there was anything else to know about it. Then along comes Vincent Bugliosi, former L.A. County deputy district attorney, prosecutor of Charles Manson and author of "Helter Skelter" and other nonfiction books about the world of crime and courtrooms. What could he have to say that would be more compelling than the real thing?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2011 | By Mitchell Landsberg, Los Angeles Times
As a prosecutor, Vincent Bugliosi put Charles Manson behind bars. As an author, he outlined legal cases against O.J. Simpson, Lee Harvey Oswald and George W. Bush. It turns out that Bugliosi was just warming up. Now the author of "Helter Skelter: The True Story of the Manson Murders," has written a book that takes on God. In "Divinity of Doubt: The God Question" (Vanguard Press), the former Los Angeles County deputy district attorney has applied his ample prosecutorial skills to the ultimate mystery: Is there a God and, if so, why does He allow evil?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
For a few years after seeing Oliver Stone's 1991 political thriller "JFK," I was an assassination buff. I bought one of the books on which the film was based: “On the Trail of the Assassins” by Jim Garrison. I reread “Libra,” Don DeLillo's masterful 1988 novel, in which Lee Harvey Oswald, assorted New Orleans spies and underworld figures conspire to kill the president. The assassination is the greatest mystery of our times, and in those books I found clues that left me feeling tantalizingly close to solving it. But 20 years ago I was cured of my conspiracy-theory fever forever.
OPINION
August 15, 2009
Re "After Manson," Opinion, Aug. 8 I would love to see the "war president," George W. Bush, prosecuted for murder, especially by Vincent Bugliosi, who prosecuted Charles Manson. But we would have to prosecute as accomplices the pro-war legislators and the American people, who are as guilty as any murderous lynch mob and confirmed their remorseless guilt by reelecting Bush. Even if the lies Bush told to stir up our ignorant masses had been true, they were no justification for our rabid conduct.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2013 | David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Early in Jeff Guinn's "Manson: The Life and Times of Charles Manson," the first full biography of the infamous mass killer, there's a moment of unexpected and discomforting empathy. It's 1939, and Manson - 5 years old, living with relatives in West Virginia while his mother is in state prison for armed robbery - has embarrassed himself by crying in a first-grade class. To toughen him up, his uncle takes one of his daughter's dresses and orders the boy to wear it to school. "Maybe his mother and Uncle Luther were bad influences," Guinn writes, "but Charlie could benefit from Uncle Bill's intercession.
OPINION
April 22, 2011
Bugliosi and God Re "Former L.A. County prosecutor challenges God," April 17 Vincent Bugliosi expresses incredulity at the goodness, omnipotence and omniscience of the Christian God. The Manson prosecutor repeats the age-old "God is mean because we die or suffer" argument. As a lawyer and a believer, I note with curiosity and some sadness how many brilliant lawyers can reach opposite conclusions based on the same facts. Christians observe evil and pain and see the gift of free will, redemption and eternity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2011 | By Mitchell Landsberg, Los Angeles Times
As a prosecutor, Vincent Bugliosi put Charles Manson behind bars. As an author, he outlined legal cases against O.J. Simpson, Lee Harvey Oswald and George W. Bush. It turns out that Bugliosi was just warming up. Now the author of "Helter Skelter: The True Story of the Manson Murders," has written a book that takes on God. In "Divinity of Doubt: The God Question" (Vanguard Press), the former Los Angeles County deputy district attorney has applied his ample prosecutorial skills to the ultimate mystery: Is there a God and, if so, why does He allow evil?
OPINION
August 15, 2009
Re "After Manson," Opinion, Aug. 8 I would love to see the "war president," George W. Bush, prosecuted for murder, especially by Vincent Bugliosi, who prosecuted Charles Manson. But we would have to prosecute as accomplices the pro-war legislators and the American people, who are as guilty as any murderous lynch mob and confirmed their remorseless guilt by reelecting Bush. Even if the lies Bush told to stir up our ignorant masses had been true, they were no justification for our rabid conduct.
OPINION
August 8, 2009 | PATT MORRISON
Vincent Bugliosi has moved on, but the world hasn't. Forty years after the impossibly grisly Tate-LaBianca murders, he is still "the Manson prosecutor." This, in spite of his many books since, arguing with magisterial fury about the JFK assassination, the O.J. Simpson trial, the Bush vs. Gore case and now the Iraq war. His book about the murders masterminded by Charles Manson, "Helter Skelter," written with coauthor Curt Gentry, hasn't been out of print since it appeared in 1974.
BOOKS
May 13, 2007 | Jim Newton, Jim Newton, editor of The Times' editorial pages, is the author of "Justice for All: Earl Warren and the Nation He Made."
VINCENT BUGLIOSI is an American master of common sense, a punishing advocate and a curmudgeonly refreshing voice of reason. His targets have been the loopy and the deranged, the deceitful and the violent. And so, a career launched with the prosecution of Charles Manson and honed with a book parsing the defense of O.J. Simpson has, with seeming inevitability, come around to 20th century America's great repository of poor reasoning: the assassination of President Kennedy on Nov. 22, 1963.
BOOKS
July 7, 1996 | Gerald Petievich, Gerald Petievich, author of "To Live and Die in L.A.," is working on a novel based within the ranks of the Los Angeles Police Department
After watching the entire televised O.J. Simpson murder trial, I didn't believe there was anything else to know about it. Then along comes Vincent Bugliosi, former L.A. County deputy district attorney, prosecutor of Charles Manson and author of "Helter Skelter" and other nonfiction books about the world of crime and courtrooms. What could he have to say that would be more compelling than the real thing?
OPINION
August 8, 2009 | PATT MORRISON
Vincent Bugliosi has moved on, but the world hasn't. Forty years after the impossibly grisly Tate-LaBianca murders, he is still "the Manson prosecutor." This, in spite of his many books since, arguing with magisterial fury about the JFK assassination, the O.J. Simpson trial, the Bush vs. Gore case and now the Iraq war. His book about the murders masterminded by Charles Manson, "Helter Skelter," written with coauthor Curt Gentry, hasn't been out of print since it appeared in 1974.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1991
Vincent Bugliosi Sr., a retired railroad conductor whose son prosecuted the infamous Charles Manson "family," has died at a Glendale hospital. He was 93. Bugliosi died Thursday after suffering a stroke, said his son, Vincent Bugliosi Jr. of Los Angeles. Born in Costacciaro, Italy, he came to the United States at age 13 and settled in Hibbing, Minn. He owned and operated a grocery store there and later worked as a conductor for the Great Northern Railroad from the early 1940s to the mid-1960s.
NEWS
February 16, 1992 | SUSAN KING, TV Times Staff Writer
As a prosecutor for the Los Angeles District Attorney's office for eight years, Vincent Bugliosi tried nearly 1,000 felony and misdemeanor cases, losing just one of his 106 felony jury trials. His most famous trial was the Charles Manson case, which became the basis of his best-selling book "Helter Skelter" and the subsequent 1976 TV movie of the same name.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1991
Vincent Bugliosi Sr., a retired railroad conductor whose son prosecuted the infamous Charles Manson "family," has died at a Glendale hospital. He was 93. Bugliosi died Thursday after suffering a stroke, said his son, Vincent Bugliosi Jr. of Los Angeles. Born in Costacciaro, Italy, he came to the United States at age 13 and settled in Hibbing, Minn. He owned and operated a grocery store there and later worked as a conductor for the Great Northern Railroad from the early 1940s to the mid-1960s.
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