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Vincent C Schoemehl

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NEWS
July 29, 1989 | ERIC HARRISON, Times Staff Writer
Things have quieted down around here lately. The mayor is sleeping at home again. The yelling and name-calling have all but faded into memory. The barricades have even come down at City Hall. It's hard to say things are normal, though.
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NEWS
July 29, 1989 | ERIC HARRISON, Times Staff Writer
Things have quieted down around here lately. The mayor is sleeping at home again. The yelling and name-calling have all but faded into memory. The barricades have even come down at City Hall. It's hard to say things are normal, though.
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NEWS
June 25, 1989
The mayor of St. Louis and his family went into hiding and a city airport commissioner was arrested after the commissioner allegedly made threats when yet another city official--his ex-wife--was relieved of some duties. When Mayor Vincent C. Schoemehl Jr. later appeared at a Democratic meeting, he was accompanied by four police officers. Luther Boykins was arrested for allegedly threatening Schoemehl, police said. He was released a few hours later. Boykins allegedly made the threat after the mayor supported legislation that limited the duties of Boykins' ex-wife, Billie Boykins, the city's license collector.
SPORTS
November 13, 1987
The day after the New York Jets beat the Seattle Seahawks, tight end Rocky Klever told Greg Logan of Newsday that he got a call from his brother in Alaska. Klever: "He told me he bet on us, and he called to thank me forwinning him some money. He said, 'I didn't want to go with you guys, but they said some stuff on ESPN about home underdogs on Monday night winning 80% of the time.'
SPORTS
January 16, 1985 | Associated Press
Citing a court decision involving the Raiders, the St. Louis Cardinals notified the National Football League Tuesday they are reserving the right to transfer the NFL's oldest continuous franchise. Notification of the club's posture was delivered in a letter to NFL headquarters in New York. The receipt of the letter was confirmed by Joe Browne, the NFL's director of information. Another league spokesman, Roger Goodell, had said previously the Cardinals had not met a 5 p.m. deadline.
NEWS
October 30, 1986 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, Times Staff Writer
The St. Louis Globe-Democrat, the 134-year-old morning daily twice near extinction in the last three years, ceased publication Wednesday after a public financing plan foundered in court. "We're closing down; the paper is out of business," said Managing Editor William Feustel shortly after the court action. Some of the paper's 700 employees headed across the street to the Missouri Grill. "Right now, I'm going to get drunk," said Jack Fahland, a Globe photographer for 21 years.
NATIONAL
July 24, 2004 | Stephanie Simon, Times Staff Writer
For one glorious summer a century ago, St. Louis had it all. The Olympics -- the third to be held in the modern era -- brought the world's best marathoners, high jumpers and tug-of-war warriors to a stadium in the dust-clogged countryside. The World's Fair transformed a swampy urban park into a glorious showcase of newfangled inventions: the X-ray machine, the dishwasher, cotton candy, the ice-cream cone, even an incubator for premature babies.
SPORTS
May 3, 1987 | Associated Press
The St. Louis Blues' season ended abruptly with first-round elimination in the NHL playoffs, but new chairman of the board Michael F. Shanahan does not dwell on the past. He tries to learn from it. "I spent a day saying 'Doggone it,' but tomorrow and the day after that there will be a little less disappointment," Shanahan said. "The season ended fast, but we'll be back."
NEWS
January 10, 1988 | LARRY GREEN, Times Staff Writer
When there were just 48 states in the nation, when movies were mostly black and white and horses still pulled milk wagons, American dreams began in neighborhoods like Clifton Heights. Here peak-roofed brick bungalows lined narrow Southwest St. Louis streets with the measured uniformity of soldiers standing at attention: each about the same size, the same distance from the curb, equally spaced one from the other. Front porches were made of wood painted battleship gray.
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