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Vincent Chalk

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1990 | JIM NEWTON and CATHERINE GEWERTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Vincent Chalk, the Irvine teacher who mde national headlines when he won the right to stay at the helm of his classroom while suffering from AIDS, died Tuesday. He was 45. Chalk died at St. Mary Medical Center about 5 a.m., said his friend and attorney, Marjorie Rushforth. He was admitted to the hospital Thursday and lapsed into a coma Saturday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1990 | KEVIN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vincent L. Chalk, the Irvine teacher with AIDS whose battle to stay in the classroom established rights for other patients, was remembered Thursday as a hero to his students and an inspiration to family and friends who paid a final tribute to his life in an emotional memorial service.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1990 | KEVIN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vincent L. Chalk, the Irvine teacher with AIDS whose battle to stay in the classroom established rights for other patients, was remembered Thursday as a hero to his students and an inspiration to family and friends who paid a final tribute to his life in an emotional memorial service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1990 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although Vincent Chalk lost his battle with AIDS, he triumphed by leaving an indelible mark on the lives of the deaf children he taught, on their parents and on his colleagues, those who loved him said Wednesday. The 45-year-old teacher died in a Long Beach hospital Tuesday. "My daughter Erica is 16 years old and a senior at University High, where she is also a cheerleader," said her mother, Lynn Dixon Gold.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1987
I was delighted to hear of the 3-0 decision by the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco to return Vincent Chalk to the classroom. This indeed is a landmark decision that will positively affect the thousands of people living with AIDS in this country. The three appellate court judges are to be commended for being able to rise above the ignorance and fear surrounding this disease to render the only fair decision possible. How very fortunate we are to have someone like Chalk finally, publicly stand up and fight for his rights as a person with AIDS.
NEWS
October 3, 1990
Vincent Chalk, the Orange County teacher who made national headlines when he won the right to stay at the helm of his classroom while suffering from AIDS, died Tuesday. Chalk, 45, died at St. Mary's Medical Center in Long Beach at about 5 a.m., said his attorney, Marjorie Rushforth. Chalk's lawsuit against the Orange County Department of Education established a landmark ruling protecting the job security of AIDS patients in government jobs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1990 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although Vincent Chalk lost his battle with AIDS, he triumphed by leaving an indelible mark on the lives of the deaf children he taught, on their parents and on his colleagues, those who loved him said Wednesday. The 45-year-old teacher died in a Long Beach hospital Tuesday. "My daughter Erica is 16 years old and a senior at University High, where she is also a cheerleader," said her mother, Lynn Dixon Gold.
BUSINESS
June 26, 1989 | Gregory Crouch, Times Staff Writer
As of April 30, 1,049 people in Orange County were known to have contracted AIDS. Of that number, 614 had died. For some, the despair associated with terminal illness is aggravated by the loss of their jobs, or the fear that they might lose them. Federal and state laws prohibit such discrimination against those with acquired immune deficiency syndrome--and also against those infected with the HIV virus that causes AIDS--but the process of seeking redress can take so long that the patient can die before the case is heard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1989 | Dianne Klein
The first time I saw Vince Chalk was two years ago, in the library of Irvine's University High School. There were lots of cameras around, network television crews and reporters with notebooks at the ready. We were all staring at Vince Chalk. We all wanted to know how he felt. On that day, good was how Vince felt, almost buoyant. He'd just won a landmark case in federal appeals court that gave him the right to return to his job counseling deaf students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1987
The Times photograph (Part I, Nov. 24) of Vincent Chalk being welcomed back to his Orange County classroom was a Christian sermon. Love and joy flashes between the teacher with AIDS and the student who hugs him. One hopes that self-identified Christians who claim AIDS is a curse from God have read that sermon. It clearly values love over hate. It clearly values joy over fear. E.H. DUNCAN DONOVAN Los Angeles
NEWS
October 3, 1990
Vincent Chalk, the Orange County teacher who made national headlines when he won the right to stay at the helm of his classroom while suffering from AIDS, died Tuesday. Chalk, 45, died at St. Mary's Medical Center in Long Beach at about 5 a.m., said his attorney, Marjorie Rushforth. Chalk's lawsuit against the Orange County Department of Education established a landmark ruling protecting the job security of AIDS patients in government jobs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1990 | JIM NEWTON and CATHERINE GEWERTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Vincent Chalk, the Irvine teacher who mde national headlines when he won the right to stay at the helm of his classroom while suffering from AIDS, died Tuesday. He was 45. Chalk died at St. Mary Medical Center about 5 a.m., said his friend and attorney, Marjorie Rushforth. He was admitted to the hospital Thursday and lapsed into a coma Saturday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1989 | Dianne Klein
The first time I saw Vince Chalk was two years ago, in the library of Irvine's University High School. There were lots of cameras around, network television crews and reporters with notebooks at the ready. We were all staring at Vince Chalk. We all wanted to know how he felt. On that day, good was how Vince felt, almost buoyant. He'd just won a landmark case in federal appeals court that gave him the right to return to his job counseling deaf students.
BUSINESS
June 26, 1989 | Gregory Crouch, Times Staff Writer
As of April 30, 1,049 people in Orange County were known to have contracted AIDS. Of that number, 614 had died. For some, the despair associated with terminal illness is aggravated by the loss of their jobs, or the fear that they might lose them. Federal and state laws prohibit such discrimination against those with acquired immune deficiency syndrome--and also against those infected with the HIV virus that causes AIDS--but the process of seeking redress can take so long that the patient can die before the case is heard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1987
I was delighted to hear of the 3-0 decision by the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco to return Vincent Chalk to the classroom. This indeed is a landmark decision that will positively affect the thousands of people living with AIDS in this country. The three appellate court judges are to be commended for being able to rise above the ignorance and fear surrounding this disease to render the only fair decision possible. How very fortunate we are to have someone like Chalk finally, publicly stand up and fight for his rights as a person with AIDS.
NEWS
September 8, 1987
A federal judge today rejected a request from an Orange County man suffering from AIDS to return immediately to his job teaching hearing-impaired students. In refusing to grant a preliminary injunction, U.S. District Judge William P. Gray said that teacher Vincent Chalk, 42, may win the right to return to the classroom after trial. But until then, Gray said, Chalk's return to the classroom would be "an unacceptable risk. . . . Being the parents of deaf children presents difficulties enough.
NEWS
May 6, 1988
AIDS patient Vincent Chalk, the Irvine teacher who won a court order last year returning him to the classroom, announced that he has accepted a $35,000 settlement from the Orange County Department of Education. Chalk, 43, was transferred out of his job as a teacher of hearing-impaired children last August by Orange County Supt. of Schools Robert Peterson. In November, the U.S.
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