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Vincent Foster

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NEWS
July 1, 1996 | a Times Staff Writer
Who hired D. Craig Livingstone to run personnel security at the Clinton White House? In the past week, no one at the White House has seemed to know. Livingstone, who was in charge of an office that housed hundreds of FBI files on former personnel, has become a political orphan with no known sponsor. On Sunday, however, White House senior advisor George Stephanopoulos offered a new account, attributing the hiring to the late Vincent Foster.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
May 6, 2003 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court announced Monday that it will decide when the public's right to know about the government's handling of a tragedy demands the release of color photos of a body. The justices voted to hear the government's claim that it may shield from disclosure four close-up photos of former White House Deputy Counsel Vincent Foster, who died 10 years ago in what five separate investigations ruled was a suicide.
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NEWS
August 30, 1997 | TONI LOCY, THE WASHINGTON POST
A private attorney for the late Vincent Foster, the deputy White House counsel who committed suicide in July 1993, will have to give an independent counsel some of his notes from a conversation he had with Foster about the firings of White House travel office employees, a federal appeals court panel ruled Friday. In a 2-1 decision, the panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C.
NATIONAL
May 3, 2003 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
A Los Angeles lawyer's solitary probe into the "mysterious death" nearly 10 years ago of former White House deputy counsel Vincent Foster has forced the U.S. Supreme Court to confront a recurring dispute in the aftermath of a tragedy. What is the proper line between the public's right to know and the right to privacy of the families who lost a loved one? Lawyer Allan J. Favish says the public cannot know the truth about the Foster case unless it has all the facts.
NEWS
August 4, 1995 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A White House attorney said Thursday that he learned shortly after the suicide of Deputy Counsel Vincent Foster in 1993 that First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton did not want to grant "unfettered access" to Foster's office. The testimony of Stephen R. Neuwirth was greeted by Republicans on the Senate Whitewater committee as evidence that the First Lady may have been part of what they believe was an effort by top White House officials to obstruct the investigation of Foster's death on July 20, 1993.
NEWS
November 3, 1995 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two close associates of First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton clashed with Republican senators repeatedly Thursday as they claimed only vague recollections of phone conversations in the hours after the death of Deputy White House Counsel Vincent Foster. Senate Whitewater Committee Chairman Alfonse M. D'Amato (R-N.Y.
OPINION
August 7, 1994 | PAUL CRAIG ROBERTS, Paul Craig Roberts, former assistant treasury secretary, is chairman of the Institute for Political Economy in Washington
Someone's lying big time about the death of White House deputy counsel Vincent Foster. Is it original Whitewater special prosecutor Robert Fiske, the FBI or the star witness? A discrepancy of this magnitude cannot be swept under the rug. It is of far more consequence than the conflicting testimony of Treasury officials about their White House meetings that is occupying the attention of Congress and the media.
NEWS
December 1, 1995 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton was asked Thursday by the Senate Whitewater investigating committee to help solve the mystery surrounding a telephone number that she apparently called on the night of July 20, 1993, shortly after police found the body of Deputy White House Counsel Vincent Foster in a suburban park. Members of the panel voted to submit four written questions to the First Lady, asking her to help them identify the Washington, D.C.
NEWS
January 7, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Whitewater prosecutors are reopening some aspects of their investigation of Vincent Foster's suicide, summoning three rescue workers before a federal grand jury to testify about the scene of the White House lawyer's death in July, 1993. Two of the witnesses had said that they saw a briefcase in Foster's parked car where the suicide occurred, according to FBI interview documents. U.S. Park Police, who investigated Foster's death, recovered no briefcase from the car. Park Police Maj.
NEWS
March 4, 1994 | Associated Press
A courier for the Rose Law Firm in Little Rock, Ark., said in secret testimony that he was told to destroy a box of documents from the files of the late White House lawyer Vincent Foster, the New York Times reported in today's editions. Quoting unidentified people familiar with the testimony, the newspaper said the employee told a federal grand jury Feb. 16 that he and a colleague used an office shredding machine in late January to destroy papers from Foster's file.
NEWS
June 26, 1998 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rebuffing independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr, the Supreme Court upheld the traditional privilege of confidentiality between lawyers and their clients Thursday and threw out his demand for notes taken by a lawyer for the late White House Deputy Counsel Vincent Foster. The shield of privacy between a lawyer and a client "is one of the oldest recognized privileges" in the law, said Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist.
NEWS
February 19, 1998 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Does the attorney-client privilege of confidentiality die when the client dies? Independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr, who is seeking notes from an attorney consulted by the late Deputy White House Counsel Vincent Foster, says that it does.
NEWS
August 30, 1997 | TONI LOCY, THE WASHINGTON POST
A private attorney for the late Vincent Foster, the deputy White House counsel who committed suicide in July 1993, will have to give an independent counsel some of his notes from a conversation he had with Foster about the firings of White House travel office employees, a federal appeals court panel ruled Friday. In a 2-1 decision, the panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C.
NEWS
July 1, 1996 | a Times Staff Writer
Who hired D. Craig Livingstone to run personnel security at the Clinton White House? In the past week, no one at the White House has seemed to know. Livingstone, who was in charge of an office that housed hundreds of FBI files on former personnel, has become a political orphan with no known sponsor. On Sunday, however, White House senior advisor George Stephanopoulos offered a new account, attributing the hiring to the late Vincent Foster.
NEWS
December 1, 1995 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton was asked Thursday by the Senate Whitewater investigating committee to help solve the mystery surrounding a telephone number that she apparently called on the night of July 20, 1993, shortly after police found the body of Deputy White House Counsel Vincent Foster in a suburban park. Members of the panel voted to submit four written questions to the First Lady, asking her to help them identify the Washington, D.C.
NEWS
November 3, 1995 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two close associates of First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton clashed with Republican senators repeatedly Thursday as they claimed only vague recollections of phone conversations in the hours after the death of Deputy White House Counsel Vincent Foster. Senate Whitewater Committee Chairman Alfonse M. D'Amato (R-N.Y.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1994
Re "Whitewater: Media Frenzy Unavoidable," news analysis, March 12: The article on the media frenzy surrounding Whitewater tells us about a "meaningless" note found in Vincent Foster's office after his alleged suicide that led to a Washington Post article speculating that it linked him to a slush fund. We are told that it now appears "it was simply a list of dates the Clintons deposited money in a school account for their daughter, Chelsea." This is the typical press double-standard when it comes to a Democrat in the White House.
NEWS
July 19, 1995 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Using the worn leather briefcase of the late White House aide Vincent Foster as a prop, Senate Republicans charged Tuesday that White House officials had conspired to obstruct an investigation of Foster's 1993 suicide because they feared it would uncover embarrassing details of President Clinton's Whitewater land deal. Chairman Alfonse M. D'Amato (R-N.Y.
NEWS
August 6, 1995 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By all accounts, a telephone call from Susan Thomases--one of First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton's best friends--has a remarkable way of getting the attention of the President's top advisers. Even though Thomases, a high-powered New York lawyer, has the habit of phoning White House aides at their homes late at night, her calls are gratefully accepted.
NEWS
August 4, 1995 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A White House attorney said Thursday that he learned shortly after the suicide of Deputy Counsel Vincent Foster in 1993 that First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton did not want to grant "unfettered access" to Foster's office. The testimony of Stephen R. Neuwirth was greeted by Republicans on the Senate Whitewater committee as evidence that the First Lady may have been part of what they believe was an effort by top White House officials to obstruct the investigation of Foster's death on July 20, 1993.
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