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Vincent Gualtieri

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1993
To cut costs, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors is considering closing the Mid-Valley Comprehensive Health Center in Van Nuys. The county faces a $1.6-billion budget shortfall and believes it can save $78.6 million by shutting Mid-Valley and other regional centers and smaller clinics throughout the county. Shutting down Mid-Valley would save $2.4 million, the county says. But Dr. Vincent Gualtieri, a Sherman Oaks urologist who serves as secretary of the Los Angeles County Medical Assn.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1993
To cut costs, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors is considering closing the Mid-Valley Comprehensive Health Center in Van Nuys. The county faces a $1.6-billion budget shortfall and believes it can save $78.6 million by shutting Mid-Valley and other regional centers and smaller clinics throughout the county. Shutting down Mid-Valley would save $2.4 million, the county says. But Dr. Vincent Gualtieri, a Sherman Oaks urologist who serves as secretary of the Los Angeles County Medical Assn.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1994 | STEVE RYFLE
With election day approaching, students at Glendale College and community groups have slated educational forums and debates on two controversial statewide ballot initiatives aimed at reforming health care and curtailing illegal immigration. Today, the Assn. of Latin American Students and the college's ethnic studies department will host the first of two forums on Proposition 187, the measure that would deny education, health care, welfare and other government services to illegal immigrants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1996 | Malpractice Cap Controversy
"Controversy Grows Over California Malpractice Cap" (Jan. 29) is a one-sided perspective of California's Medical Injury Reform Compensation Act (MICRA). There is no question that medical injury caused by negligence should be compensated adequately and promptly. MICRA amply provides for this with unlimited awards for economic damages. It also covers physical pain and suffering requiring future medical and psychiatric treatment. However, pain and suffering that includes intangible or emotional elements such as future unhappiness, anger, or general emotional distress cannot be quantified and would not be changed by an award of any amount.
OPINION
July 16, 1995
It is indeed ironic that you published Gregg Easterbrook's perceptive piece on public fear of exotic diseases ("High Anxiety," Opinion, July 9) at a time when Los Angeles County is engaged in the wholesale dismantling of its public health structure. Fearing a distant outbreak of Ebola virus that killed a few hundred is ridiculous, but there is not enough concern over tuberculosis, cholera, plague, measles, influenza and AIDS in our country. Between 1988 and 1991 in our country we had over 7,000 reported cases of measles resulting in 2,700 expensive hospitalizations and 40 deaths.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1994 | Compiled for The Times by M.K. Kuehler
The Clinton Administration's move to reform the American health-care system is fueling debate over who is qualified to deliver different levels of care to patients. Here some medical professionals share their views. BENJAMIN SHWACHMAN Anesthesiologist and past president, Medical Assn. of Los Angeles County Nurse practitioners should think of practicing in the same light as physicians do: Proceed with great fear.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1996 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly 2 1/2 years after the San Fernando Valley's biggest county health clinic was wrecked by the Northridge earthquake, the Board of Supervisors voted Tuesday to begin building an $11.3-million replacement. Supervisors allocated $724,000 for design work on a replacement for the Mid-Valley Comprehensive Health Center, which has long provided prenatal care, vaccinations and screenings for tuberculosis and sexually transmitted diseases for thousands of low-income residents.
BUSINESS
October 8, 1995
Columnist James Flanigan's suggestion for a new tax on health providers to finance health care for the uninsured ("Health Care Crisis Could be Solved by--Yes--a New Tax," Sept. 20) ignores the mammoth scope of our country's problems. There are 2.6 million people in Los Angeles County who do not have health insurance. That's roughly 10 times as many as in all of Minnesota, the state Flanigan holds up as a model for a provider tax. A 2% tax on the gross revenue of providers would not pay for the health care of our huge number of uninsured.
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