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Vincent Lane

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NEWS
June 2, 1994 | STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Cabrini-Green projects tower over the northern edge of downtown like a high-rise graveyard, a monument to the futility of three decades of public housing policy and the hopelessness of all who live there. Vincent Lane, the man who runs these skyline eyesores of mottled cinder-block and security fencing, comes here often on a mission that many Cabrini tenants regard as a fool's errand.
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NEWS
June 2, 1994 | STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Cabrini-Green projects tower over the northern edge of downtown like a high-rise graveyard, a monument to the futility of three decades of public housing policy and the hopelessness of all who live there. Vincent Lane, the man who runs these skyline eyesores of mottled cinder-block and security fencing, comes here often on a mission that many Cabrini tenants regard as a fool's errand.
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NEWS
May 10, 1989
The Chicago Housing Authority turned over a public housing project to its 3,500 tenants to run themselves in the first such agreement in that city. Management of the 615-unit LeClaire Courts on the city's Southwest Side changed hands at a ceremony attended by U.S. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Jack Kemp, Mayor Richard M. Daley and city housing chief Vincent Lane. Unlike many of Chicago's public-housing projects, LeClaire Courts is a complex of low-rise structures, most of them two-story apartment buildings separated by wide lawns and residential streets.
NEWS
October 21, 1992 | From Associated Press
Police began shutting down four buildings at the notorious Cabrini-Green public housing project Tuesday and boosting security at other buildings, but some residents viewed it as just another crackdown. "Six months from now everything is going to come back," said Eddie Leason, 38. He watched police search the 10- and 19-story towers and carpenters construct entryways at other buildings that will house armed guards and metal detectors.
NEWS
April 8, 1994 | From Associated Press
Police cannot conduct warrantless gun searches in public housing projects, a federal judge said Thursday. The decision rebuffed pleas from housing officials and tenants who hoped that the sweeps would quell gang violence. U.S. District Judge Wayne Anderson's ruling ended the latest round in an emotional dispute between city officials and civil libertarians, who argue that the courts cannot grant a wholesale waiver of the Constitution's protection against unreasonable searches.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1989
As part of his broader drug-control strategy, President Bush wants to spend $50 million sweeping drugs and dealers out of public housing projects. The violence that drugs breed has reached nightmarish levels in many housing projects and warrants serious federal attention. To pay for the fight against crime, the federal budget director has suggested shifting dollars from scarce public-housing operating funds. That is not sound strategy. Maintenance needs are severe in the aging projects.
NEWS
October 8, 1991 | TRACY SHRYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a trip to Israel last year, Chicago Housing Authority Chairman Vincent Lane was struck by something that seemed oddly familiar about the kibbutzim he saw. Most were situated in remote, arid parts of the country and in virtual firing range of enemy borders. "This is really what (our) public housing residents have to deal with: gangs and drug dealers who threaten them daily," Lane said. "And as far as the physical environment, it is totally barren. No jobs. No services. No nothing."
NEWS
March 24, 1991 | SHARON COHEN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
In five years, Sharon Gipson became an expert on the many indignities of public housing: leaky roofs, stopped-up sewers, shoddy service, bloated bureaucracy. That was as a tenant. Now she is determined to make big changes--as manager. Gipson juggles both lives at LeClaire Courts, a housing project in which low-income people make high-powered decisions about their neighbors, their needs and the fate of their Southwest Side community. Power to the poor.
NEWS
December 11, 1992 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President-elect Bill Clinton has chosen his first female Cabinet members, picking Donna Shalala, chancellor of the University of Wisconsin, to head the Department of Health and Human Services, and Carol Browner, a former top aide to Vice President-elect Al Gore, to head the Environmental Protection Agency, transition sources said Thursday.
NEWS
April 7, 1994 | STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like soldiers in an army of occupation, squads of police officers fan out each night through the Robert Taylor Homes, a tombstone row of high-rise tenement buildings that loom for 18 city blocks over the Dan Ryan Expressway in south Chicago. Ignoring taunts from gang members, they poke through bullet-pocked elevator shafts, boiler rooms and laundry commons, searching for automatic weapons.
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