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Vincent Movie

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1988 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
Painter Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890) and film maker Paul Cox ("Lonely Hearts," "Man of Flowers") share some essential qualities. Both work from an outsider's viewpoint. Both are prolific--though Van Gogh's 1,800 canvases in 10 years far outstrip Cox's 29 films, short and long, since 1965. Both can be moody, idealistic, explosive. And both were born in the south of Holland, in countryside areas only 40 kilometers apart.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1993 | DENNIS HUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than half of the 110 movies that the late Vincent Price made are on video--and about one-third of them are his signature horror movies. Ironically, his death Monday came just days before Halloween, when there is peak interest in those films. Since Price's passing has been such big news, some retailers will undoubtedly capitalize on the publicity by displaying even more of his movies than they would anyway at this time of year.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1993 | DENNIS HUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than half of the 110 movies that the late Vincent Price made are on video--and about one-third of them are his signature horror movies. Ironically, his death Monday came just days before Halloween, when there is peak interest in those films. Since Price's passing has been such big news, some retailers will undoubtedly capitalize on the publicity by displaying even more of his movies than they would anyway at this time of year.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1988 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
Painter Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890) and film maker Paul Cox ("Lonely Hearts," "Man of Flowers") share some essential qualities. Both work from an outsider's viewpoint. Both are prolific--though Van Gogh's 1,800 canvases in 10 years far outstrip Cox's 29 films, short and long, since 1965. Both can be moody, idealistic, explosive. And both were born in the south of Holland, in countryside areas only 40 kilometers apart.
NEWS
June 2, 1994 | RAY LOYND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After a long, dark silence, the historic red-brick Union Temple Hall in Old Town has been transformed into Pasadena's newest live theatrical venue. The Dramatic New Arts Theater Company signaled its opening and mission with an obscure early play by a master of absurdist theater, Eugene Ionesco.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 1999 | JUDITH MICHAELSON
MOVIES New Line for Nava: Filmmaker Gregory Nava and his El Norte Productions have been signed by New Line Cinema to a two-year production deal, under which the director of "Selena" will produce an unspecified number of movies with Latino themes. Nava told Daily Variety that El Norte intends to make movies that have "universal stories and crossover appeal." He will write and direct some of them, and produce others as a vehicle to bring new talent into the industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1994 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
San Diego isn't reputed to harbor the world's most progressive opera company, or, for that matter, the world's most adventurous audience. But there it was, Saturday night at the Civic Theatre: the American premiere of "La Hija de Rappaccini," a.k.a. "Rappaccini's Daughter," by Daniel Catan. The event was billed as "the first fully-professional production of an opera by a Mexican composer to be staged in the United States." At first glance, that shameful claim seemed hard to believe.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1992 | KEVIN BRASS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Long before Monday night, local coverage of the execution of convicted murderer Robert Alton Harris had assumed the atmosphere of a moon launch. With ominous clarity, stories counted down the last hours of Harris' life. As 12:01 Tuesday morning neared, stays issued by the courts were like holds from Mission Control, leaving the audience in suspended animation waiting for events to continue.
TRAVEL
November 13, 1988 | ELLEN ALPERSTEIN, Alperstein is a Santa Monica free-lance writer. and
My guide and companion, Gillian Collison, adeptly tapped into my predilection for a casual, spontaneous outing, so we were off across the Darling Ranges and into the Avon River Valley. A happily agrarian landscape, the valley was first explored in the 1830s by Ensign Dale. This Avon is pronounced with a short "a," unlike the Shakespearean river which serves, one could assume, as its namesake.
NEWS
November 9, 1989 | DAVID TREADWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a glorious Indian summer day in Manhattan, the kind that Umberto Eco ordinarily might spend roaming the city streets and drinking in the sights and sounds. But these are not ordinary times for the portly, bearded university professor-turned-novelist, who created a literary sensation almost a decade ago with the publication of his first fictional work, "The Name of the Rose."
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