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December 2, 1996 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The American Cinematheque's "Contract Man: A Tribute to Vincent Sherman" calls long-overdue attention to one of Hollywood's finest studio craftsmen just as he's published his candid and illuminating autobiography, "Studio Affairs: My Life as a Film Director." The series starts Friday at Raleigh Studios at 7 p.m. with "The Hard Way" (1942), which Sherman considers his most personal film.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2006 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Vincent Sherman, who directed Humphrey Bogart, Bette Davis and Errol Flynn during their 1940s heyday at Warner Bros. and was one of the last surviving studio-era contract directors, has died. He was 99. Sherman died Sunday night of natural causes at the Motion Picture and Television Hospital, his son Eric Sherman told the Associated Press. An actor-turned-screenwriter, Sherman began his directing career at Warner Bros. in 1939 with the low-budget "The Return of Dr.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2006 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Vincent Sherman, who directed Humphrey Bogart, Bette Davis and Errol Flynn during their 1940s heyday at Warner Bros. and was one of the last surviving studio-era contract directors, has died. He was 99. Sherman died Sunday night of natural causes at the Motion Picture and Television Hospital, his son Eric Sherman told the Associated Press. An actor-turned-screenwriter, Sherman began his directing career at Warner Bros. in 1939 with the low-budget "The Return of Dr.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2004 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Veteran director Vincent Sherman can't believe he'll be 98 on July 16. And for good reason: He looks and acts like a man in his 70s. He has a girlfriend, actress Francine York, who is a good 30 years his junior. He even has a website where he sells his autobiography and autographed photos. Sitting in the dining room of his pleasant Malibu hilltop home, Sherman is nattily dressed -- his blue sweater and ascot show off his blue eyes and white hair.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2004 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Veteran director Vincent Sherman can't believe he'll be 98 on July 16. And for good reason: He looks and acts like a man in his 70s. He has a girlfriend, actress Francine York, who is a good 30 years his junior. He even has a website where he sells his autobiography and autographed photos. Sitting in the dining room of his pleasant Malibu hilltop home, Sherman is nattily dressed -- his blue sweater and ascot show off his blue eyes and white hair.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1994 | KEVIN THOMAS
"Cinecon '30"--the Society of Cinephiles' 30th annual convention--is being held through Labor Day at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel, 7000 Hollywood Blvd., where lovers of vintage movies will watch more than 30 features, most of them rarities. There will be guest appearances and a movie collectibles show on the mezzanine floor. Screenings will be held in the Blossom Room, site of the first Oscar presentations, and the Cinegrill, except for a Sunday morning double feature at the El Capitan.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2006 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Despite all the hype -- and controversy -- "The Da Vinci Code" (Sony, $30), Ron Howard's lavish adaptation of Dan Brown's religious thriller, landed in theaters with a critical thud. Still, "Da Vinci," which stars Tom Hanks, Audrey Tautou, Ian McKellen, Jean Reno and Paul Bettany, managed to earn more than $200 million domestically at the box office.
NEWS
July 29, 2004 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
KEYSTONE KOPS never looked so good. A painstakingly restored version of Mack Sennett's "Tillie's Punctured Romance" -- which featured Marie Dressler, Charlie Chaplin and a cast of comic Sennett legends -- screens tonight as part of UCLA Film Archive's 12th Festival of Preservation. An 82-minute six-reeler based on the play "Tillie's Nightmare," it is regarded as the first feature-length comedy and is still hilarious.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2005 | Susan King
The Bette Davis Collection; the Joan Crawford Collection Warner Home Video. $50 for each collection, $20 for an individual film Bette DAVIS and Joan Crawford were two of cinema's biggest female stars, racking up 200 pictures between them, along with three Oscars and 13 Academy Award nominations. The two also nursed a bitter rivalry, which came to a head when they made "What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?" in 1962. Crawford once said of Davis, "I resent her.
NEWS
September 21, 1997 | DENNIS McLELLAN
The Orange County chapter of Sisters in Crime--an organization of mystery authors and readers--will host a fifth anniversary celebration and author appreciation program at 3 p.m. today in the community room at Pacifica Hospital, 18800 Delaware Ave., Huntington Beach. The public is invited.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1996 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The American Cinematheque's "Contract Man: A Tribute to Vincent Sherman" calls long-overdue attention to one of Hollywood's finest studio craftsmen just as he's published his candid and illuminating autobiography, "Studio Affairs: My Life as a Film Director." The series starts Friday at Raleigh Studios at 7 p.m. with "The Hard Way" (1942), which Sherman considers his most personal film.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 1997 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hollywood's loss is Glendale's gain. After six years at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel, Cinecon, the Society for Cinephiles, will hold its 33rd annual film festival at the Red Lion Hotel and Alex Theater, the Glendale's magnificent, fully restored movie palace, tonight through Monday morning. Over the extended Labor Day Weekend, Cinecon will present a wide array of silent pictures and early talkies and whenever possible, panel discussions with the actors and technicians involved in their making.
NEWS
July 28, 2002 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During a career that spanned 45 years, Joan Crawford played the role of the glamorous movie star to perfection. Her adopted daughter Christina Crawford, who penned the memoir "Mommie Dearest," says her mother focused all of her attentions on being a movie star. "She wasn't educated, but she was smart," says Crawford. "Whatever you put your focus on is what you do well."
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