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Vincent Valdez

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2007
I am blown away by the beautifully written piece "Driven to Distraction" (Sept. 16) about artist Vincent Valdez and his Chavez Ravine opus for Ry Cooder. Most art stories are as dull as watching paint dry, but Lynell George gave us a compelling and thoughtful account of this artist's process, creative battle and journey. Valdez is very talented, but I now appreciate and understand the thought and action behind each brush stroke. His creation is valorous, and so was the article.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2007
I am blown away by the beautifully written piece "Driven to Distraction" (Sept. 16) about artist Vincent Valdez and his Chavez Ravine opus for Ry Cooder. Most art stories are as dull as watching paint dry, but Lynell George gave us a compelling and thoughtful account of this artist's process, creative battle and journey. Valdez is very talented, but I now appreciate and understand the thought and action behind each brush stroke. His creation is valorous, and so was the article.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2007 | Lynell George, Times Staff Writer
VINCENT VALDEZ thought it should be simple enough. The job: Retelling the nasty land-grab saga of Chavez Ravine, with all its vivid twists and turns, in all of its lurid hues. The story was shot through with themes that the young artist often revisited in his work: class and race, haves and have-nots, history and hearsay. The only significant twist in this project was that instead of a using a standard canvas, he'd be layering the narrative onto a truck.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2007 | Lynell George, Times Staff Writer
VINCENT VALDEZ thought it should be simple enough. The job: Retelling the nasty land-grab saga of Chavez Ravine, with all its vivid twists and turns, in all of its lurid hues. The story was shot through with themes that the young artist often revisited in his work: class and race, haves and have-nots, history and hearsay. The only significant twist in this project was that instead of a using a standard canvas, he'd be layering the narrative onto a truck.
BOOKS
December 1, 2002 | Robert J. Lopez, Robert J. Lopez is a Times staff writer.
In a seminal essay published shortly before his death in 1970, Los Angeles Times columnist Ruben Salazar asked: "Who is a Chicano? And what is it the Chicanos want?" It was a time when tens of thousands of Mexican Americans, fueled by anger and a newfound sense of cultural and political awareness, waged open rebellion against a system that for generations had repressed and marginalized them.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2007 | Agustin Gurza, Times Staff Writer
You've got to hand it to Ry Cooder. When he embraces a new musical culture, he doesn't care where the adventure takes him. A decade ago, he traveled to Havana, where he stumbled upon the Buena Vista Social Club -- and got slapped with a hefty fine for violating the U.S. embargo of Cuba. On Sunday, the acclaimed American guitarist found himself in a place where white men rarely tread -- a Pico Rivera nightclub called A Mi Hacienda.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2011 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Let's start with the hands, Ry Cooder's hands. They're large, expressive: hands you could see wrapped around a guitar neck, or in the act of making things. They move when he speaks, creating shapes in the air that take form and dissipate, all in the space of a few words. On a Friday afternoon at the Petersen Automotive Museum, Cooder is using those hands to help recount the saga of "El Chavez Ravine," a 1953 Chevy pickup he commissioned to be rebuilt in 2007 in the style of a vintage ice cream truck and covered with an elaborate mural, by the artist Vincent Valdez, depicting the eviction of Mexican American families from the neighborhood that is now home to Dodger Stadium.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2008 | Agustin Gurza, Times Staff Writer
After more than seven years on the road, the Chicano art collection of Cheech Marin has finally come home. Its last stop is the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the hometown venue that initially turned down a show that toured nationally and drew large crowds as "Chicano Visions." A scaled-down version, titled "Los Angelenos/Chicano Painters of L.A.," opens Sunday at LACMA West. It features almost 50 paintings by some of the most influential members of the first generation of Chicano artists, including Gronk, Patssi Valdez and three of the original members of Los Four -- Frank Romero, Carlos Almaraz and Gilbert "Magu" Lujan -- the collective featured in what is considered the country's first major Chicano art exhibition, shown at LACMA in 1974.
NEWS
March 4, 2004 | Duane Noriyuki, Times Staff Writer
Velvet painting's stature in the art world is akin to that of creamed corn in the province of fine cuisine. Although artists have been putting paint to fuzzy fabric since the 14th century, velvet painting's reputation is understandably weighed down by the volume of curio Elvises and crying clowns sold inexpensively at the Mexican border alongside porcelain burros and ashtrays shaped like Texas.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2013 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
It's a Catholic thing. It's an immigrant-underdog thing. It's an acoustic-punk thing. There are many reasons why, for the last 10 or 11 years - the precise number is lost in the fog of memory - the L.A. Chicano band Ollin has celebrated St. Patrick's Day by paying tribute to the Pogues, the Anglo Irish ensemble that slammed the lilting grace of traditional Celtic music together with punk's raw energy during the Reagan-Thatcher era. Ollin's annual...
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2005 | Lynell George, Times Staff Writer
It's one of those grim afternoons when the whole of L.A. seems to have simply up and vanished; disappeared behind a dirty, gray scrim of smog and haze. You could have sworn you saw it just a moment ago. So where did it all get to so fast? On days like this, Ry Cooder would just as soon tuck himself away anyway, conjure up something else to fit in the absence. His hideaway-cum-laboratory is an old relic of a studio -- Sound City -- slipped into a nondescript cul-de-sac in Panorama City.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1987 | GREG BRAXTON, Times Staff Writer
Drinkers around the tinsel-draped bar at Mexican Jones, a restaurant on Van Nuys Boulevard, were paying little attention to the room around them as the notes of "Jingle Bell Rock" blasted from the sound system one holiday night. That changed abruptly when two uniformed Los Angeles Police Department officers and a state Alcoholic Beverage Control investigator entered.
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