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Vincent Van Gogh

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February 15, 1987 | WILLIAM WILSON
On Saturday, 25 May 1890, Vincent Van Gogh wrote to a critic who had praised his work urging him to keep any further comment to a minimum, "Because it is absolutely certain that I shall never do important things." Two months later the artist walked into the Auvers countryside, leaned his easel against a tree and shot himself below the heart.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2013 | By David Ng
A newly identified landscape painting believed to have been created by Vincent Van Gogh in 1888, just two years before his death, was unveiled Monday by the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam. "Sunset at Montmajour" depicts a wooded area near Arles in the south of France. The museum said that the work dates from around the same period that Van Gogh created his famous "Sunflowers" painting. The museum said it has spent two years authenticating the piece, using historic records, X-ray analysis and other techniques.  ART: Can you guess the high price?
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2009 | Susan Salter Reynolds
Whole Green Catalog 1,000 Best Things for You and the Earth Edited Michael W. Robbins Foreword by Bill McKibben Introduction by Renee Loux Rodale: 390 pp., $29.99 It's about time. Modeled on the "Whole Earth Catalog," this compendium of products, easy on the Earth, ranges from kitchenware to cars to pet food. Lush and stylish, the book lists everything you need to make you want to go off-grid: sustainable skateboards, products to help you recycle, appliances, biofuel and cashmere.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Opera was born to be mad. The first great opera concerned the demented Roman emperor Nero. In the nearly three centuries since Monteverdi's "The Coronation of Poppea," mad scene has succeeded mad scene on the lyric stage. They still do, as Long Beach Opera demonstrated Saturday night at Bixby Knolls Expo Art Center with a seemingly crazy double bill of two recent American operas - Michael Gordon's "Van Gogh" and Stewart Copeland's "Tell-Tale Heart. " Each opera is, in essence, an excitable - and exciting - extended mad scene.
NEWS
July 25, 1990 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Vincent van Gogh, whose artistic brilliance and supposed madness have made him a focus of popular fascination, suffered not from epilepsy or insanity but from an inner-ear disorder that causes vertigo and ringing ears, a new analysis of his letters suggests. The authors of the study, reported today in the Journal of the American Medical Assn.
NEWS
January 9, 1991 | From United Press International
A still-life painting by Vincent Van Gogh has turned up in the home of a suburban Milwaukee couple who plan to sell it, a Chicago auction house said today. Leslie Hindman, who owns the auction house, said the painting, "Still Life With Flowers," was discovered by John Kuhn, a commercial real estate agent and part-time art prospector for Hindman. He recognized the painting as a Van Gogh last July when he saw it hanging on the couple's wall while he was examining antique furniture in their home.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1990 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Behind the impressive Vincent van Gogh retrospective that opened last week in two Dutch cities lay an idea to display works that the artist himself might have picked--if he were somehow resurrected and given several million dollars to pay insurance premiums on the collection. "We tried to select only those works of art that Vincent van Gogh would have shown," curator Louis van Tilborgh declared boldly in a recent interview.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1999
What made Vincent van Gogh tick? More than a century after his death, he may be the world's most popular artist--and the most misunderstood.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Van Gogh Suspects Nabbed: Four suspects, including a museum guard, have been arrested in the bungled theft of 20 Vincent van Gogh paintings worth hundreds of millions of dollars, police in Amsterdam announced Thursday. The paintings were recovered in an abandoned car about half an hour after the April 14 robbery, which would have been among the greatest art heists in history.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1990
Is Rohrabacher aware that the works of Vincent Van Gogh, Emily Dickinson and James Joyce were not "something valued by others" at the time of their creation? Perhaps he would have urged these artists to stop "wasting their time." THERESA KARANIK Santa Monica
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2012 | By Jori Finkel
Did Caravaggio use optical devices - essentially transforming his studio into a giant camera obscura  - to make his paintings? Pegged to their big exhibitions this winter, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Getty and the Norton Simon have organized a range of talks with guest scholars and scholar-scientists, and a LACMA lecture next week promises to address that question head-on. Admission to all of the lectures noted below is free, but some museums suggest advance reservations.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2012 | By Holly Myers
What is it, exactly, about Van Gogh? For those of us with a vested interest in contemporary art, who spend much of our time immersed in the work of artists most Americans have never heard of, it is an important question to ponder from time to time - one that the Norton Simon Museum's temporary installation of an 1889 self-portrait on loan from the National Gallery of Art calls again to the fore. There is no more familiar face in all of modern art history: the piercing blue eyes; the gaunt, sallow features; the imagined spectacle of a severed ear (turned discretely away from the viewer in this, as in most, variations)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2012 | By Philip Brandes
Vincent Van Gogh didn't just work at things - he attacked them, eulogizes his grieving brother Theo in the Next Arena's revival of “Vincent.” As performed by French-born actor Jean-Michel Richaud, this insightful and often moving 1981 solo show penned by Leonard Nimoy transcends the usual clichés surrounding the high-maintenance artist with the tortured relationship to his aural appendage. Nimoy knows from ears, of course, but his script looks beyond merely sensational biographical episodes to the unifying themes in three principal facets of Vincent's adult life: God, love and art. As Theo admits during an imaginary tribute conducted a week after his brother's death, Vincent pursued all three with perhaps an overdeveloped sense of drama, but always with passion.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2011 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to The Los Angeles Times
Leaving Van Gogh A Novel Carol Wallace Spiegel & Grau: 268 pp., $25 "Vincent wrote once in a letter that a man who commits suicide turns his friends into murderers. What does that make me?" writes Dr. Paul Gachet in Carol Wallace's riveting fictional memoir of his very real relationship with Vincent van Gogh. It is with this tone of fondness and regret that Gachet tells how Vincent first came to his house in Auvers on the banks of the Oise, after the ear episode, after his tumultuous summer with Cézanne and after leaving the asylums at Remy and Arles.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2009 | Susan Salter Reynolds
Whole Green Catalog 1,000 Best Things for You and the Earth Edited Michael W. Robbins Foreword by Bill McKibben Introduction by Renee Loux Rodale: 390 pp., $29.99 It's about time. Modeled on the "Whole Earth Catalog," this compendium of products, easy on the Earth, ranges from kitchenware to cars to pet food. Lush and stylish, the book lists everything you need to make you want to go off-grid: sustainable skateboards, products to help you recycle, appliances, biofuel and cashmere.
SCIENCE
July 30, 2008 | Karen Kaplan, Times Staff Writer
Using a thin beam of synchrotron X-rays generated by a particle accelerator, European scientists have reconstructed a portrait of a peasant woman painted by Vincent van Gogh that had been concealed beneath another painting for 121 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2004 | From Associated Press
The forehead, the shape and size of the eyes, even individual hairs matched up, making forensic scientist Albert Harper sure he had discovered an original photograph of famed artist Vincent van Gogh. The photograph, which dates to 1886 and was found in the early 1990s at an antique dealer, bears a striking resemblance to Van Gogh's self-portraits, said Harper, director of the Henry Lee Institute of Forensic Science.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1997
Re "2 UC Regents Nominations Win Approval in Senate," July 12. For Senate leader Bill Lockyer to make a comparison between UC Regent Chairman Tirso del Junco and Mike Tyson is as absurd as comparing Evander Holyfield's ear to Vincent Van Gogh's. Del Junco has given years of dedicated service and has made significant contributions to the state of California. Sen. Lockyer, an apology is in order. Then bite your tongue! ERIN DONLEY Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
Actress Elizabeth Taylor can keep a Vincent van Gogh painting after the U.S. Supreme Court rejected an appeal by three people who said their great-grandmother was forced to sell the work before fleeing Nazi Germany in 1939. On Monday, the justices, without comment, refused to revive a lawsuit that demanded Taylor turn over the painting, "View of the Asylum and Chapel at Saint-Remy." Taylor has owned the painting, now worth an estimated $20 million, since 1963.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2007 | From Reuters
Actress Elizabeth Taylor can keep a Van Gogh painting that might have been illegally seized by the Nazis because the family that once owned it waited too long to ask for it back, a U.S. appeals court ruled Friday. Taylor, 75, bought the 1889 painting "View of the Asylum and Chapel at Saint-Remy" at a Sotheby's auction in London in 1963 for 92,000 British pounds -- about $257,000 at the time. She keeps it in her Los Angeles-area home.
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