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Vincent Ward

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1991 | SUSAN KING
The popularity of "La Femme Nikita" in the United States has taken French actress Anne Parillaud by surprise. "It's a weird country," she says. "It's hard to understand what they are thinking." But there's no question the acclaimed French thriller has put the actress on the map of international cinema. She vividly brings to life the enigmatic Nikita, a former junkie who is turned into a cool, sophisticated government assassin.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1998 | MARSHALL FINE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There are almost as many hypotheses in movies about what the afterlife looks like as there are religious interpretations on the subject. But, while no one can quite agree on how big the wings might be and whether the architecture is Grecian or Victorian, most movie-makers do agree on something basic: Stick to one vision of the sweet hereafter.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1998 | MARSHALL FINE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There are almost as many hypotheses in movies about what the afterlife looks like as there are religious interpretations on the subject. But, while no one can quite agree on how big the wings might be and whether the architecture is Grecian or Victorian, most movie-makers do agree on something basic: Stick to one vision of the sweet hereafter.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1993 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Map of the Human Heart" represents the high point of New Zealand-born filmmaker Vincent Ward's offbeat 15-year career. It's a passionate love story, starring Jason Scott Lee as a half-Inuit, half-English youth; Anne Parillaud as a half French-Canadian, half-American Indian girl, and Patrick Bergin as an English cartographer. With locales in the Arctic, Montreal and London and featuring a terrifyingly authentic re-creation of the bombing of Dresden, it has a truly epic scale.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1989 | JONATHAN DOWLING, Dowling is a New Zealand-based free-lance writer specializing in film and broadcasting. and
Vincent Ward's first film, shot at art school, called for a naked man to run across a semifrozen lake. No one in the conservative city of Christchurch would agree to his odd request, so Ward ended up stripping down and doing the job himself. It's a story Ward likes to tell, and it illustrates several qualities about this tenacious New Zealand director. It shows, he says, how we learned to make films--"literally by jumping in and getting my feet wet; by falling down on my face and trying again."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1993 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Map of the Human Heart" represents the high point of New Zealand-born filmmaker Vincent Ward's offbeat 15-year career. It's a passionate love story, starring Jason Scott Lee as a half-Inuit, half-English youth; Anne Parillaud as a half French-Canadian, half-American Indian girl, and Patrick Bergin as an English cartographer. With locales in the Arctic, Montreal and London and featuring a terrifyingly authentic re-creation of the bombing of Dresden, it has a truly epic scale.
NEWS
March 15, 1998 | Michael Wilmington
New Zealand's Vincent Ward has a visionary's eye, a tribalist's sympathies and a technologue's expertise. This stunningly visualized tale of an Eskimo boy's romantic tragedy is the most ambitious of all his works. It is about the clash between primitivism and civilization, map-making, the Dresden firebombing and the dangers of playing God. With Jason Scott Lee and Anne Parillaud (both pictured), Patrick Bergin and Jeanne Moreau (HBO Monday at 2 a.m.).
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1988 | John Voland, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The Australian Film Institute handed out its annual film awards--affectionately known as the "Ozcars"--in Sydney on Tuesday. "The Navigator," directed by Vincent Ward and produced by John Maynard, won the best film prize and five other major awards, while "The Lighthorsemen" copped two awards.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1991 | SUSAN KING
The popularity of "La Femme Nikita" in the United States has taken French actress Anne Parillaud by surprise. "It's a weird country," she says. "It's hard to understand what they are thinking." But there's no question the acclaimed French thriller has put the actress on the map of international cinema. She vividly brings to life the enigmatic Nikita, a former junkie who is turned into a cool, sophisticated government assassin.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1989 | JONATHAN DOWLING, Dowling is a New Zealand-based free-lance writer specializing in film and broadcasting. and
Vincent Ward's first film, shot at art school, called for a naked man to run across a semifrozen lake. No one in the conservative city of Christchurch would agree to his odd request, so Ward ended up stripping down and doing the job himself. It's a story Ward likes to tell, and it illustrates several qualities about this tenacious New Zealand director. It shows, he says, how we learned to make films--"literally by jumping in and getting my feet wet; by falling down on my face and trying again."
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