Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVincent Ward
IN THE NEWS

Vincent Ward

ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1989 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
Vincent Ward's "The Navigator" (Westside Pavilion) transports us to as remote a time and place imaginable, a snow-covered copper-mining village in Cumbria, in March of 1348.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1998
MOVIES Directed by "Map of the Human Heart's" Vincent Ward, "What Dreams May Come" stars Robin Williams (right), Cuba Gooding Jr., Annabella Sciorra and Max Von Sydow in a tale of a love so powerful that it defies the bounds of heaven and earth. The film opens Friday in general release. MOVIES "Antz," DreamWorks' first animated film, is the tale of a revolution in an ant colony that becomes a celebration of individuality in the face of overwhelming conformity.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1998 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Some movies are so cloying and simplistically sentimental they could rouse the Grinch in a saint. "What Dreams May Come" is a hymn to enduring romance off-putting enough that playing the old rock anthem "Love Stinks" at top volume is the only reliable antidote.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1993 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When a filmmaker dares greatly, tries to touch the sky, he or she runs the risk of looking absurd. Audiences quick to scoff at "pretension" may miss the grandeur lying right in front of them. Vincent Ward's "Map of the Human Heart" (AMC Century 14), a startling epic of cultural seduction, has that kind of grand overreaching.
BUSINESS
May 3, 1997 | CLAUDIA ELLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
PolyGram Filmed Entertainment, hoping to compete with Hollywood's major studios and better position itself in the global marketplace, on Friday launched a new U.S. movie distribution company and announced the executive team who will run it. The company plans to release five major motion pictures in its first year of operation, working up to 10 to 12 annually by 2000.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1992 | Andy Marx
With the onslaught of this summer's movies comes a tidal wave of screenwriting credits. And those are just the credited writers. Take "Alien 3," for example. The screenplay is by David Giler & Walter Hill and Larry Ferguson. The ampersand indicates that Giler and Hill worked together as a team. And while Ferguson, whose name is separated by an and , was not officially part of that team, according to a Writers Guild arbitration, he's credited with 50% of the screenplay.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1986 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
"Vigil" (opening Friday at Westside Pavilion) celebrates nature in its eternal cycle of life and death as it is experienced by an imaginative, isolated New Zealand farm girl named Toss (Fiona Kay) on the brink of puberty. In his first full-length feature, Vincent Ward, the most gifted and original of New Zealand's film makers, has created an extraordinary visual and psychological experience, a work of awesome beauty at once mystical and earthy, robust and eerie.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1990 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the spirit of Halloween, Filmforum tonight will present Peggy Ahwesh and Keith Sanborn's outrageous half-hour "The Deadman" (LACE at 8), which in its raunchy sex and camp pathos recalls early Warhol and such vintage underground fare as the late Curt McDowell's "Thundercrack!" A sendup of lurid vamp melodrama, complete with silent-era intertitles, it plays around with the old sex-death equation, in this case the uninhibited carrying on of a young woman after the demise of her lover.
NEWS
December 19, 2002 | Mary Colbert, Special to The Times
There are movie premieres with star celebs sashaying down red carpets to the beat of bulb-popping paparazzi and then there are those like the hometown celebratory unveiling of Peter Jackson's "The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers," the second part of the Lord of the Rings trilogy, that took place Wednesday evening in New Zealand's capital, (or Wellywood as it is now known), that are events of Super Bowl proportions.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1988 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
It was hard to believe that a world-class film festival could emerge from the behind-the-scenes shambles that was Cannes just two nights ago. But old hands only laughed at what seemed to be major demolition still in progress backstage, and predicted that by Wednesday night at 7:30 the annual Cannes miracle would take place.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|