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Vincent William Acosta

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1989 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, Times Staff Writer
A jury Wednesday began debating whether to convict an Anaheim man of murder for leading police on a frenzied 1987 chase that led to the deaths of three men in a helicopter crash. Vincent William Acosta, who will turn 22 next week, could face 45 years to life in prison if the jury finds him guilty of second-degree murder in the crash. The key facts of the case remained virtually undisputed over the course of a weeklong trial before Superior Court Judge Robert R. Fitzgerald.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2006 | Juliet Chung, Times Staff Writer
An Anaheim man imprisoned after two police officers and a civilian were killed in a 1987 helicopter crash while pursuing him has been charged with selling methamphetamine. Vincent William Acosta, 38, who authorities say is a north Orange County leader of the Mexican Mafia, is also charged with possessing a gun and drugs. He appeared in court Wednesday where a $1-million bond was set. He could receive a 136-year prison sentence if convicted on all counts.
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NEWS
May 12, 1989 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, Times Staff Writer
An Orange County jury, deciding that Vincent William Acosta knew the possible hazards when he led police on a frenzied car chase in 1987, found the Anaheim man guilty Thursday of murdering three men in the collision of two pursuing police helicopters. While murder verdicts have been returned previously in the deaths of pedestrians and other motorists killed during car chases, the Acosta jury broke new ground in finding that a blatantly reckless driver can be held criminally responsible for causing the deaths of airborne victims as well.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1991
In response to "Conviction Is Upset in O.C. Copter Deaths" (Aug. 2), I am inclined to write my own dissenting opinion to those of the appeal judges involved in this case. To refresh your memory, in 1987 defendant (and appellant) Vincent William Acosta, driving a stolen car, led police on a chase through four different cities at speeds up to 90 m.p.h. During the aerial part of the pursuit, police helicopters from Newport Beach and Costa Mesa collided, killing all three occupants in the Costa Mesa helicopter.
NEWS
July 29, 1989 | JERRY HICKS, Times Staff Writer
An Anaheim man who led police on a high-speed auto chase that left three people dead in the crash of two pursuit helicopters was given the maximum prison term Friday. "You've been an accident (waiting) to happen since you were 14 years old," Superior Court Judge Robert R. Fitzgerald told Vincent William Acosta, 22. Fitzgerald sentenced Acosta to 45 years to life in prison. Prosecutors had asked only for a 30-year sentence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2006 | Juliet Chung, Times Staff Writer
An Anaheim man imprisoned after two police officers and a civilian were killed in a 1987 helicopter crash while pursuing him has been charged with selling methamphetamine. Vincent William Acosta, 38, who authorities say is a north Orange County leader of the Mexican Mafia, is also charged with possessing a gun and drugs. He appeared in court Wednesday where a $1-million bond was set. He could receive a 136-year prison sentence if convicted on all counts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1991
In response to "Conviction Is Upset in O.C. Copter Deaths" (Aug. 2), I am inclined to write my own dissenting opinion to those of the appeal judges involved in this case. To refresh your memory, in 1987 defendant (and appellant) Vincent William Acosta, driving a stolen car, led police on a chase through four different cities at speeds up to 90 m.p.h. During the aerial part of the pursuit, police helicopters from Newport Beach and Costa Mesa collided, killing all three occupants in the Costa Mesa helicopter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1989 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, Times Staff Writer
Vincent William Acosta realized the hazard he was creating when he sped away from police one night in 1987 and must now be blamed for the deaths of three men whose police helicopter crashed while in hot pursuit, a prosecutor urged a jury Tuesday. Acosta "knew it was dangerous to the bone to be driving the way he did," but ignored the risks in leading police on a 45-minute chase that led to the in-flight collision of two helicopters, one of which crashed, Deputy Dist. Atty. Thomas James Borris told jurors in Superior Court in Santa Ana. The prosecutor's claims came at the beginning of Acosta's murder trial Tuesday, more than 2 years after the collision.
NEWS
August 2, 1991 | JERRY HICKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An appellate court has thrown out the murder conviction of an Anaheim man who led police on 1987 chase in a stolen car that resulted in the crash of two police helicopters and the deaths of three men on board. Justice Thomas F. Crosby of the 4th District Court of Appeal said that while Vincent William Acosta, now 23, may have been guilty of "despicable behavior," that did not make him criminally responsible for the air crash.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1987 | ROXANA KOPETMAN, Times Staff Writer
Three second-degree murder charges were filed Thursday against Vincent William Acosta, the 19-year-old Anaheim man suspected of leading police on a high-speed chase in which three people were killed when two police helicopters collided. Deputy Orange County Dist. Atty. Tom Borris said Acosta's conduct in the chase "was so reckless" that prosecutors will argue that he acted with malice and thus is guilty of murder even though he did not intentionally kill anyone.
NEWS
August 2, 1991 | JERRY HICKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An appellate court has thrown out the murder conviction of an Anaheim man who led police on 1987 chase in a stolen car that resulted in the crash of two police helicopters and the deaths of three men on board. Justice Thomas F. Crosby of the 4th District Court of Appeal said that while Vincent William Acosta, now 23, may have been guilty of "despicable behavior," that did not make him criminally responsible for the air crash.
NEWS
July 29, 1989 | JERRY HICKS, Times Staff Writer
An Anaheim man who led police on a high-speed auto chase that left three people dead in the crash of two pursuit helicopters was given the maximum prison term Friday. "You've been an accident (waiting) to happen since you were 14 years old," Superior Court Judge Robert R. Fitzgerald told Vincent William Acosta, 22. Fitzgerald sentenced Acosta to 45 years to life in prison. Prosecutors had asked only for a 30-year sentence.
NEWS
May 12, 1989 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, Times Staff Writer
An Orange County jury decided that Vincent William Acosta knew the possible hazards when he led police on a frenzied car chase in 1987 and found him guilty Thursday of murdering three men in the collision of two pursuing police helicopters. While murder verdicts have been returned previously in the deaths of pedestrians and motorists killed on the ground during such chases, the Acosta jury broke new legal ground in finding that a blatantly reckless driver can be held criminally responsible for causing the deaths of airborne victims as well.
NEWS
May 12, 1989 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, Times Staff Writer
An Orange County jury, deciding that Vincent William Acosta knew the possible hazards when he led police on a frenzied car chase in 1987, found the Anaheim man guilty Thursday of murdering three men in the collision of two pursuing police helicopters. While murder verdicts have been returned previously in the deaths of pedestrians and other motorists killed during car chases, the Acosta jury broke new ground in finding that a blatantly reckless driver can be held criminally responsible for causing the deaths of airborne victims as well.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1989 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, Times Staff Writer
A jury Wednesday began debating whether to convict an Anaheim man of murder for leading police on a frenzied 1987 chase that led to the deaths of three men in a helicopter crash. Vincent William Acosta, who will turn 22 next week, could face 45 years to life in prison if the jury finds him guilty of second-degree murder in the crash. The key facts of the case remained virtually undisputed over the course of a weeklong trial before Superior Court Judge Robert R. Fitzgerald.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1989 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, Times Staff Writer
Vincent William Acosta realized the hazard he was creating when he sped away from police one night in 1987 and must now be blamed for the deaths of three men whose police helicopter crashed while in hot pursuit, a prosecutor urged a jury Tuesday. Acosta "knew it was dangerous to the bone to be driving the way he did," but ignored the risks in leading police on a 45-minute chase that led to the in-flight collision of two helicopters, one of which crashed, Deputy Dist. Atty. Thomas James Borris told jurors in Superior Court in Santa Ana. The prosecutor's claims came at the beginning of Acosta's murder trial Tuesday, more than 2 years after the collision.
NEWS
May 12, 1989 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, Times Staff Writer
An Orange County jury decided that Vincent William Acosta knew the possible hazards when he led police on a frenzied car chase in 1987 and found him guilty Thursday of murdering three men in the collision of two pursuing police helicopters. While murder verdicts have been returned previously in the deaths of pedestrians and motorists killed on the ground during such chases, the Acosta jury broke new legal ground in finding that a blatantly reckless driver can be held criminally responsible for causing the deaths of airborne victims as well.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1987 | ROXANA KOPETMAN and MARK LANDSBAUM, Times Staff Writers
As federal investigators pieced together the details of a collision of police helicopters over Irvine that left three dead, a 19-year-old Anaheim man was charged Thursday with three counts of murder for his role in the tragedy. The Orange County district attorney's office filed three second-degree murder charges against Vincent William Acosta, who was being pursued in a high-speed chase when police helicopters from Newport Beach and Costa Mesa collided and crashed at 10:20 p.m. Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1987 | ROXANA KOPETMAN, Times Staff Writer
Three second-degree murder charges were filed Thursday against Vincent William Acosta, the 19-year-old Anaheim man suspected of leading police on a high-speed chase in which three people were killed when two police helicopters collided. Deputy Orange County Dist. Atty. Tom Borris said Acosta's conduct in the chase "was so reckless" that prosecutors will argue that he acted with malice and thus is guilty of murder even though he did not intentionally kill anyone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1987 | ROXANA KOPETMAN and MARK LANDSBAUM, Times Staff Writers
As federal investigators pieced together the details of a collision of police helicopters over Irvine that left three dead, a 19-year-old Anaheim man was charged Thursday with three counts of murder for his role in the tragedy. The Orange County district attorney's office filed three second-degree murder charges against Vincent William Acosta, who was being pursued in a high-speed chase when police helicopters from Newport Beach and Costa Mesa collided and crashed at 10:20 p.m. Tuesday.
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