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HOME & GARDEN
September 18, 2011 | By Deborah Netburn, Los Angeles Times
A computer for babies may sound like the stuff of science fiction, but a Canadian company has just made it reality. Last month Rullingnet Corp. launched Vinci, a 7-inch touch-screen tablet that sells for $389 to $479 and is marketed exclusively for children 4 and younger. To some parents, Vinci is an exciting, if pricey, step in the future of early childhood education. For others, the idea of buying a tablet for a baby is excessive, if not downright creepy. As Rullingnet points out, this is a serious computer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2014 | By Ed Stockly
Customized TV Listings are available here: www.latimes.com/tvtimes Click here to download TV listings for the week of March 23 - 29, 2014 in PDF format This week's TV Movies SERIES Ripper Street Investigation into the brutal slaying of a newspaper boy leads Inspector Reid (Matthew MacFadyen) to one of the city's most eminent financial institutions in this new episode. 9 p.m. BBC America Da Vinci's Demons The second season of the historical drama series premieres with Leonardo (Tom Riley)
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NEWS
December 18, 1986 | Associated Press
"Mona Lisa" has fascinated art historians and inspired love songs for centuries, but her ineffable gaze is not that of a mysterious woman, a researcher says. It's that of artist Leonardo da Vinci. A computer researcher at American Telephone & Telegraph Co.'s Bell Laboratories juxtaposed a red chalk self-portrait of da Vinci with "Mona Lisa" and found that the eyes, hairline, cheeks and nose were identical, according to the January issue of Art & Antiques magazine.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2013 | By David Ng, A correction has been added to this post, as indicated below.
A portrait of a woman believed to have been painted by Leonardo da Vinci has been discovered in the vault of a Swiss bank, according to a report in the Italian press. But doubt exists over the piece's authenticity and additional research still needs to be completed. The piece -- a painting of a Renaissance noblewoman named Isabella d'Este -- was discovered amid a collection of hundreds of items belonging to an Italian family, according to a report in Italy's Corriere Della Sera.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2009 | Scott Martelle
This is how a writer knows his books have grabbed the full attention of mainstream American culture. By the time Dan Brown's "The Lost Symbol," his first novel since 2003's "The Da Vinci Code," lands on bookstore shelves Tuesday, pre-orders will have kept it at or near the top of Amazon's bestseller list for the last 148 days. On Sunday, Parade magazine published a selection from "The Lost Symbol," the first time it has excerpted a novel in its 68-year history. Beginning last Tuesday, in a marketing merger between publisher Doubleday and NBC, "Today" show co-host Matt Lauer unveiled a clue a day about the closely guarded plot.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2009 | Nick Owchar
The wait is over. "The Lost Symbol," the follow-up to Dan Brown's 2003 mega-seller, "The Da Vinci Code," is here -- and you don't have to be a Freemason to enjoy it (although it wouldn't hurt). Like "Angels and Demons," published in 2000, and "The Da Vinci Code," "The Lost Symbol" solves puzzles, analyzes paintings and reveals forgotten histories -- all so that Brown's tireless hero, Robert Langdon, can find a legendary Masonic treasure despite special ops squads that are dogging him and a bizarre killer who has kidnapped his dear friend and mentor.
NEWS
May 5, 2009
"Angels & Demons": An article in Sunday Calendar's Summer Sneaks section said the movie "Angels & Demons" was adapted from the Dan Brown novel that had preceded the author's "The Da Vinci Code" on bestseller lists. Though "Angels & Demons" was published before "The Da Vinci Code," it hit bestseller lists later.
SPORTS
August 21, 1993
The trivia time in your Morning Briefing column sure poses some tough informational questions. In your Aug. 16 column, the trivia question was: "What do Jack the Ripper, Harpo Marx, Sandy Koufax, Leonardo da Vinci and Todd Marinovich have in common?" The answer was: "All were or are left-handed." I didn't know Len da Vinci was a lefty. Gosh! CHUCK PERI Moreno Valley
NEWS
April 18, 1987 | Associated Press
Hundreds of tourists lined up outside Milan's Santa Maria della Grazie church on Good Friday as Leonardo da Vinci's masterpiece "Last Supper" was reopened to the public on a restricted basis. The exhibit had been closed to the public for two months while officials studied ways of protecting the tempera painting from pollution.
OPINION
May 15, 2006
Re " 'Da Vinci Code' Now a Tool to Win Christian Converts," May 11 I don't know why some churches are worried that people would think Christianity is a sham just because of "The Da Vinci Code." I mean, we have our Christmas tree (a Druidic symbol worshiped during the winter solstice) and eggs at Easter (Oester, a pagan goddess worshiped during the spring equinox festival, when village children would hunt for colorful eggs). You wanted proof that Christianity is more than a religion cobbled together from various others by powerful men in Rome who needed to control the masses?
SPORTS
September 5, 2013 | By Diane Pucin
NEW YORK -- Top-seeded Sara Errani and Roberta Vinci had beaten Venus and Serena Williams in the quarterfinals of the Australian Open. Thursday at the U.S. Open, the result was reversed. The Italians were overpowered by the unseeded Williams sisters, 6-3, 6-1, in the women's doubles quarterfinals. The sisters weren't challenged. Leading, 5-1, in the second set, Serena gave her team its first match point with a ferocious return winner. And Venus took that cue with one of her own to finish off the match.
SPORTS
September 4, 2013 | By Diane Pucin
NEW YORK -- Flavia Pennetta advanced to her first Grand Slam semifinal by upsetting fellow Italian and 10th-seeded Roberta Vinci on Wednesday, 6-4, 6-1, at the U.S. Open. The  31-year-old Pennetta had become the first Italian woman to be ranked in the top 10 but since  has been surpassed by several women, including Sara Errani, who seeded fourth for the U.S. Open, and Vinci from Italy. Pennetta was ranked 83rd. Pennetta and Vinci, former doubles partners, gave each other a long hug and Vinci gave Pennetta a kiss on the cheek and whispered into her ear, "Brava.
SPORTS
September 2, 2013 | By Diane Pucin
NEW YORK -- Rain has arrived at the U.S. Open and so far it has caused the match between No. 2-seeded Victoria Azarenka and 13th-seeded Ana Ivanovic to be postponed until Tuesday. So far the only lucky finisher is 10th-seeded Roberta Vinci, who beat fellow Italian countrywoman Camila Giorgi, 6-4, 6-2, in 67 minutes Monday. Giorgi had upset sixth-seeded Caroline Wozniacki, a former U.S. Open finalist, but her enthusiasm and power were matched and bettered by the 30-year-old Vinci.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2013 | By David Ng
Leonardo da Vinci explored the possibility of human flight centuries before the Wright brothers made it a reality. A notebook that the Renaissance artist created on the subject will be making a rare trip to the U.S. in an exhibition at the Smithsonian's National Air & Space Museum in September. "Codex on the Flight of Birds" -- which experts believe the artist created to study avian flight in order to better understand its mechanics -- will be on exhibit in Washington from Sept. 13 to Oct. 22. The Smithsonian said the Codex will be displayed near the Wright brothers' 1903 aircraft, and will be supplemented by an interactive digital display that will allow visitors to virtually browse the notebook.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
Ashton Kutcher plays Steve Jobs in the upcoming biopic “Jobs,” and Wednesday on “The Tonight Show” he had high praise for the late tech mogul.   Kutcher recalled how he missed an opportunity to meet Jobs about six months before he passed away - something that he now regrets. “In hindsight I look back and think I had the opportunity to meet the Leonardo da Vinci of our generation, and I missed it. That really affected my decision to take on the role,” he said, likening his own experience of Jobs' passing to that of JFK. PHOTOS: Celebrities by The Times After returning home, Kutcher went to his computer, where the realization dawned on him “that all the relationships I have in my life are held together by glue that he laid down.” “I realize that I'd taken for granted the contribution that he actually gave to society.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
"Da Vinci's Demons" premiered on Starz on Friday. On Wednesday, Starz showed signs of great confidence in the show by ordering a second season. The series from creator David Goyer tells the "untold" story of Leonardo da Vinci's youthful days in Renaissance-era Florence. It's described as a historical fantasy and depicts the 25-year-old Da Vinci (Tom Riley) inventing the future through his ingenious creations. Times TV critic Mary McNamara described the series as borrowing "from film, television and video games to create something new, inarguably flawed, possibly revolutionary and certainly fun to watch.
OPINION
May 22, 2006
Re "Coda to the 'Code,' " editorial, May 19 The Times' assertion that "The Da Vinci Code" is "only a movie" is akin to saying that the reprehensible Nazi newspaper "Der Sturmer" that attacked Jews in 1930s' Germany was "only a newspaper." Christians are upset by this movie because our society condemns attacks against religious, ethnic and gender groups but allows hate speech against Christians. It's a double standard that The Times fails to recognize. ANDY DECKER San Gabriel To all "The Da Vinci Code" protesters: It's a movie!
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Like its title character, "Da Vinci's Demons" prefers to flaunt rather than follow, flagrantly borrowing from film, television and video games to create something new, inarguably flawed, possibly revolutionary and certainly fun to watch. For several years, Starz has been flailing around in search of a show that would satisfy the youthful proclivities of its "Spartacus" audience while lending the network a bit more artistic heft. With its "Assassin's Creed" overtones and "Game of Thrones" top notes, "Demons" should satisfy the former, and even a story that too often turns Leonardo da Vinci into a Florentine Sherlock Holmes can't diminish the artistic heft of the original Renaissance man. After a quasi-mystical "Leonardo liked to get stoned" opener, creator David S. Goyer flamboyantly uses "Downton Abbey's" Hugh Bonneville to quickly establish the show's premium cable status: Bonneville's Duke of Milan greets the morn by first urinating, naked and on-camera (when did this become the new hallmark of cable's hard R?
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