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Vinicio Cerezo Arevalo

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NEWS
March 11, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Americas Watch, a human rights group based in New York, accused the government of President Vinicio Cerezo Arevalo of trying to cover up "unspeakable" abuses by the military. The report was issued four days after the United States recalled its ambassador to highlight U.S. displeasure with Cerezo's record.
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NEWS
March 11, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Americas Watch, a human rights group based in New York, accused the government of President Vinicio Cerezo Arevalo of trying to cover up "unspeakable" abuses by the military. The report was issued four days after the United States recalled its ambassador to highlight U.S. displeasure with Cerezo's record.
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NEWS
March 7, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Guatemalan President Vinicio Cerezo Arevalo, responding to the recall of U.S. Ambassador Thomas Stroock for consultations on a deteriorating human rights situation in Guatemala, charged that U.S. policy is unfair and inconsistent. "The attitude of the United States is unjust and unfairly critical," Cerezo said. "We didn't hear this kind of criticism with dictatorships in the past." Cerezo was elected in 1985, ending 17 years of military rule.
NEWS
March 7, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Guatemalan President Vinicio Cerezo Arevalo, responding to the recall of U.S. Ambassador Thomas Stroock for consultations on a deteriorating human rights situation in Guatemala, charged that U.S. policy is unfair and inconsistent. "The attitude of the United States is unjust and unfairly critical," Cerezo said. "We didn't hear this kind of criticism with dictatorships in the past." Cerezo was elected in 1985, ending 17 years of military rule.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1988
I was very pleased to read your editorial on Guatemala, my homeland, because it seems to me that major newspapers in the United States have for so long ignored or failed to address the current situation there ("Safety Net for Guatemala" Aug. 30). Guatemala's presidential election was the result of a carefully calculated maneuver by the military, the real power in Guatemala, to allow a Christian Democrat, Vinicio Cerezo Arevalo, to take office. It was in no way a gift to the people from the armed forces, but rather a last step in the consolidation of the political phase of the military's long-term counterinsurgency strategy aimed at preventing the transformation of the growing internal discontent of the population into a generalized civil war. The widespread international belief that a democratic regime is governing Guatemala has allowed Cerezo to accomplish one of the military's main goals: the resumption of U.S. aid to the military and economic aid to the government.
NEWS
May 10, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
Dissident soldiers backed by three combat aircraft marched toward strategic points of the capital in a pre-dawn uprising Tuesday but were stopped by troops loyal to civilian President Vinicio Cerezo Arevalo, his government reported. Guatemalan officials said the two-hour coup attempt was staged by 300 army and air force men and led by 12 active or retired officers harboring a mixture of grievances. They said 10 of the plotters were arrested and not a shot was fired. "Today there was an attempt to break the constitutional order of the country, but at this moment the situation is under the government's and the army's control," Cerezo told reporters at the National Palace.
NEWS
November 25, 1988 | KENNETH FREED, Times Staff Writer
Guatemalan government forces are responsible for a serious increase in human rights abuses, including "hundreds of political killings, disappearances and attempted assassinations" since the start of 1988, according to a leading human rights organization. In a report released today, the New York-based Americas Watch said that from Jan. 1 to Sept.
NEWS
February 17, 1987 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
The pattern of disappearance and murder was distressingly familiar. Late last month, Camilo Garcia, an impoverished hill farmer who had settled in Guatemala City, was awaiting a local jitney when a carload of men in civilian clothing approached. The armed men bundled him into a car and Garcia was never heard from again. Two days later, Garcia's wife, Marta Odilia Raxal, and her mother, Maria Sisimit, went looking for him.
NEWS
August 29, 1988 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Under pressure from extreme rightist military officers and mounting labor unrest, President Vinicio Cerezo Arevalo is facing the greatest challenge to his presidency in 2 1/2 years, according to diplomats and political analysts. Cerezo is halfway through his term as one of the few civilian presidents in Guatemalan history, but some observers say he is so weak politically that he may not be able to serve out his five-year term.
NEWS
September 26, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Alleged right-wing extremists have unleashed a campaign of kidnapings, assassinations and bombings in the worst wave of political violence to strike Guatemala since civilian President Vinicio Cerezo Arevalo took office nearly four years ago. In recent weeks, 10 San Carlos University students were abducted in the capital. Five were later found dead with signs of having been tortured, while the other five are still missing.
NEWS
September 26, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Alleged right-wing extremists have unleashed a campaign of kidnapings, assassinations and bombings in the worst wave of political violence to strike Guatemala since civilian President Vinicio Cerezo Arevalo took office nearly four years ago. In recent weeks, 10 San Carlos University students were abducted in the capital. Five were later found dead with signs of having been tortured, while the other five are still missing.
NEWS
May 10, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
Dissident soldiers backed by three combat aircraft marched toward strategic points of the capital in a pre-dawn uprising Tuesday but were stopped by troops loyal to civilian President Vinicio Cerezo Arevalo, his government reported. Guatemalan officials said the two-hour coup attempt was staged by 300 army and air force men and led by 12 active or retired officers harboring a mixture of grievances. They said 10 of the plotters were arrested and not a shot was fired. "Today there was an attempt to break the constitutional order of the country, but at this moment the situation is under the government's and the army's control," Cerezo told reporters at the National Palace.
NEWS
November 25, 1988 | KENNETH FREED, Times Staff Writer
Guatemalan government forces are responsible for a serious increase in human rights abuses, including "hundreds of political killings, disappearances and attempted assassinations" since the start of 1988, according to a leading human rights organization. In a report released today, the New York-based Americas Watch said that from Jan. 1 to Sept.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1988
I was very pleased to read your editorial on Guatemala, my homeland, because it seems to me that major newspapers in the United States have for so long ignored or failed to address the current situation there ("Safety Net for Guatemala" Aug. 30). Guatemala's presidential election was the result of a carefully calculated maneuver by the military, the real power in Guatemala, to allow a Christian Democrat, Vinicio Cerezo Arevalo, to take office. It was in no way a gift to the people from the armed forces, but rather a last step in the consolidation of the political phase of the military's long-term counterinsurgency strategy aimed at preventing the transformation of the growing internal discontent of the population into a generalized civil war. The widespread international belief that a democratic regime is governing Guatemala has allowed Cerezo to accomplish one of the military's main goals: the resumption of U.S. aid to the military and economic aid to the government.
NEWS
August 29, 1988 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Under pressure from extreme rightist military officers and mounting labor unrest, President Vinicio Cerezo Arevalo is facing the greatest challenge to his presidency in 2 1/2 years, according to diplomats and political analysts. Cerezo is halfway through his term as one of the few civilian presidents in Guatemalan history, but some observers say he is so weak politically that he may not be able to serve out his five-year term.
NEWS
February 19, 1988 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Two years after taking office following a succession of army generals, civilian President Vinicio Cerezo Arevalo still packs a pistol. Critics say the president carries the weapon to foster an image of David confronting an anti-democratic Goliath. Cerezo, who has survived three attempts on his life, says he is motivated by habit and by Guatemala's history of political violence.
NEWS
February 19, 1988 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Two years after taking office following a succession of army generals, civilian President Vinicio Cerezo Arevalo still packs a pistol. Critics say the president carries the weapon to foster an image of David confronting an anti-democratic Goliath. Cerezo, who has survived three attempts on his life, says he is motivated by habit and by Guatemala's history of political violence.
NEWS
February 27, 1987 | Associated Press
President Miguel de la Madrid will visit Guatemala April 8-10 for talks with President Vinicio Cerezo Arevalo on economic, scientific, cultural and trade relations, the Foreign Ministry announced Thursday.
NEWS
February 17, 1987 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
The pattern of disappearance and murder was distressingly familiar. Late last month, Camilo Garcia, an impoverished hill farmer who had settled in Guatemala City, was awaiting a local jitney when a carload of men in civilian clothing approached. The armed men bundled him into a car and Garcia was never heard from again. Two days later, Garcia's wife, Marta Odilia Raxal, and her mother, Maria Sisimit, went looking for him.
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