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NEWS
May 14, 2003 | James Gerstenzang, Times Staff Writer
Of the seven military and police forces in Saudi Arabia, perhaps none is more important than the National Guard. It has one overarching assignment: protecting the royal, ruling House of Saud. Of the hundreds of U.S. firms operating in Saudi Arabia, perhaps none is more important to the royal family than the Vinnell Corp. The Fairfax, Va., unit of Los Angeles-based Northrop Grumman Corp. trains the National Guard.
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OPINION
May 16, 2003 | William D. Hartung
You had probably never heard of the Vinnell Corp. before the brutal bombing that killed at least nine of its employees in Saudi Arabia this week, but you should have. This is the second time Vinnell's Saudi operations have been targeted. The first attack, in November 1995, hit the headquarters of the Saudi Arabian National Guard, or SANG, and a nearby office complex that housed Vinnell employees. Though both attacks were decried by U.S.
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OPINION
May 16, 2003 | William D. Hartung
You had probably never heard of the Vinnell Corp. before the brutal bombing that killed at least nine of its employees in Saudi Arabia this week, but you should have. This is the second time Vinnell's Saudi operations have been targeted. The first attack, in November 1995, hit the headquarters of the Saudi Arabian National Guard, or SANG, and a nearby office complex that housed Vinnell employees. Though both attacks were decried by U.S.
NEWS
May 14, 2003 | James Gerstenzang, Times Staff Writer
Of the seven military and police forces in Saudi Arabia, perhaps none is more important than the National Guard. It has one overarching assignment: protecting the royal, ruling House of Saud. Of the hundreds of U.S. firms operating in Saudi Arabia, perhaps none is more important to the royal family than the Vinnell Corp. The Fairfax, Va., unit of Los Angeles-based Northrop Grumman Corp. trains the National Guard.
WORLD
June 9, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
An unknown assailant fatally shot an American who worked for a U.S. defense contractor in Riyadh, the Saudi capital. Robert C. Jacobs, 62, of Murphysboro, Ill., was shot at his home, and his body was found by another employee of Vinnell Corp., a subsidiary of Northrop Grumman Corp., a Northrop spokeswoman said. It was the second deadly shooting of a Westerner in the kingdom in three days. A BBC cameraman was killed Sunday and a correspondent with him was wounded.
WORLD
June 13, 2004 | Josh Meyer, Times Staff Writer
A group claiming affiliation with Al Qaeda said it had killed an American and kidnapped another Saturday in Saudi Arabia, amid fresh intelligence reports that the terrorist network's followers were planning similar attacks, a senior U.S. counter-terrorism official said. "There's a steady stream of information about activity and plotting," said the official, who described the intelligence as an alarming development in the recent spate of attacks against Westerners in Saudi Arabia.
OPINION
March 31, 2005 | MAX BOOT, Max Boot is a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations.
Ever since Ronald Reagan proclaimed in his 1981 inaugural address that "government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem," leaders at all levels of government, Democrats and Republicans alike, have been outsourcing as much work as possible to the private sector. This is generally a good idea, but when it comes to the military, this trend may have gone too far. Peter W.
NEWS
May 14, 2003 | Robin Wright, Times Staff Writer
It was calculated down to a matter of seconds, and it unfolded in less than a minute. The clock started ticking around 11:20 Monday night. With stopwatch precision, the American sedan -- accounts vary on whether it was a white Ford Crown Victoria or a gray Mercury -- drove up a narrow street to the guardhouse of the Vinnell Corp. compound, passing a sign on the high perimeter wall that warns, "Visitors must be escorted."
OPINION
May 15, 2003 | Wyche Fowler and Edward S. Walker, Wyche Fowler, a former U.S. senator (D-Ga.), was ambassador to Saudi Arabia from 1997 to 2001. Edward S. Walker, a former assistant secretary of State and ambassador to Israel, was ambassador to Egypt from 1994 to 1998.
The brutality of the crime will not soon be forgotten. Gunmen stepped out of their vehicles, quickly approached the site, shot the security guards patrolling the area and then indiscriminately murdered anyone in their path. Foreigners began evacuating the country immediately. The government, having battled the same extremists for more than a decade, engaged forcefully in a wide-scale crackdown on radical Islamic groups. The country was Egypt. The city was Luxor. The date was Nov. 17, 1997.
NEWS
May 14, 2003 | Evelyn Iritani, Peter Pae and David Streitfeld, Times Staff Writers
The terrorist attacks in the Saudi capital of Riyadh are unlikely to cause many U.S. companies based there to pull out, especially since many of them are oil or defense concerns accustomed to operating in troubled regions, business experts said Tuesday. But they warned that the bombings could deter prospective investors, striking a blow to the Bush administration's newly launched campaign to develop a free-trade zone in the Middle East within the next decade.
WORLD
September 16, 2003 | John Daniszewski, Times Staff Writer
On a dusty plain, a squadron of rifle-toting men in camouflage forms a rough wedge that zigzags toward its objective, a small cluster of earthen mounds. In a deft set of maneuvers, the men fan out, flank the position, advance, and then completely overrun the two "enemy" defenders who roll over as though dead. But like children playing war, the soldiers have merely mimed the action of firing their guns because their trainers didn't have blank ammunition for them to use.
WORLD
July 20, 2003 | John Hendren and David Zucchino, Times Staff Writers
Deputy Defense Secretary Paul D. Wolfowitz, a chief architect of the short-lived war here that has lapsed into guerrilla conflict, insisted Saturday that the U.S. military is committed to Iraq, and he spoke passionately about the need to bring members of Saddam Hussein's regime to justice. "We're not playing any games with Saddam Hussein," Wolfowitz said, bristling at the suggestion of an official from the southern city of Karbala that the U.S.
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