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July 17, 1993 | MIKE BOEHM
While trying to find a new record company to give his stalled career a new head of steam, Vinnie James has been having fun doing the "Locomotion" on tour with Carole King. Playing solo-acoustic, the singer-songwriter from Huntington Beach is the opening act on King's 12-city national tour, which ends Sunday at the Universal Amphitheatre. "Vinnie has been doing an encore duet (with King) on 'Locomotion,' " his manager, Jonathan First, said Thursday. "They're getting along amazing."
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 1994 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vinnie James, the singer-songwriter from Orange County who was praised by critics for his debut album in 1991, is back with a new nom de rock and a new direction: He will be known as Masada on his next album, which is geared for the Christian rock market. The almost-completed record, due early next year, will be called "No More Plastic Jesus."
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1989 | MIKE BOEHM
Children grow up wishing that their skins were black or white Because you've taught them to believe that one was wrong and one was right. --From "Here Goes Tomorrow," by Vinnie James In a society knotted and distorted for 400 years by a tragic preoccupation with race, it is hardly surprising that music too becomes a matter of black and white. Vinnie James hopes that he can help dispel the fallacy that sound is circumscribed by color.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1993 | MIKE BOEHM
While trying to find a new record company to give his stalled career a new head of steam, Vinnie James has been having fun doing the "Locomotion" on tour with Carole King. Playing solo-acoustic, the singer-songwriter from Huntington Beach is the opening act on King's 12-city national tour, which ends Sunday at the Universal Amphitheatre. "Vinnie has been doing an encore duet (with King) on 'Locomotion,' " his manager, Jonathan First, said Thursday. "They're getting along amazing."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 1994 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vinnie James, the singer-songwriter from Orange County who was praised by critics for his debut album in 1991, is back with a new nom de rock and a new direction: He will be known as Masada on his next album, which is geared for the Christian rock market. The almost-completed record, due early next year, will be called "No More Plastic Jesus."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1991 | MIKE BOEHM, Albums are rated on a scale of one star (poor) to five (a classic)
*** 1/2 Vinnie James, "All American Boy," Cypress/RCA. This black, Orange County-based rocker debuts with a set of charged, passionate, mostly politicized songs that attack racism and other injustices. Besides abundant energy and often imaginative approaches to big issues, James shows a keen pop instinct as he sets his raw, R&B-tinged vocals (lots of Graham Parker in there) against spare, bristling folk-rock arrangements.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1986 | RANDY LEWIS, Times Staff Writer
In the ghettos of New York, "rumble" means a street fight between rival gangs. In the suburbs of Orange County, however, "rumble" usually refers to an earthquake. So the name Rumbletown, with its explosive, urban connotations, seems a peculiar choice for a band based in placid Orange County.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1991 | MIKE BOEHM
Besides the fact that they live in Orange County and play folk-based rock, Vinnie James and Richard Stekol would seem to have little in common. Stekol is a graying veteran who has seen his share of disappointments in a 20-year career dating back to his days with that band of local '70s heroes, Honk. His debut solo album, "Richard Stekol," is a quiet, introspective work released by a small, untested Orange County record company that will have to hustle and scratch to win it an airing.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 1991 | JEAN ROSENBLUTH
T he top 1991 freshmen of Southern California come from all over the musical map--from rap to country to Beatle-pop to grunge-rock. Here's a look at the 12 new area acts who've made the biggest splash this year. Vinnie James: Sure, he called his debut album "All American Boy," but don't let that fool you. This singer-songwriter and his Graham Parker-ish music are about as traditional as sushi at a baseball game.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1997 | MIKE BOEHM
"No ska, no punk, no metal, no dice" has been the rule for Orange County rock bands trying to make a large impact on the world. From Ann De Jarnett and Vinnie James in the late '80s to Water and Mark Davis in the mid-'90s, every talented local act taking a roll with traditional melodic guitar-rock has crapped out, and not for lack of merit. Maybe Exit will be the one to find a way off that highway to heartbreak.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1991 | MIKE BOEHM, Albums are rated on a scale of one star (poor) to five (a classic)
*** 1/2 Vinnie James, "All American Boy," Cypress/RCA. This black, Orange County-based rocker debuts with a set of charged, passionate, mostly politicized songs that attack racism and other injustices. Besides abundant energy and often imaginative approaches to big issues, James shows a keen pop instinct as he sets his raw, R&B-tinged vocals (lots of Graham Parker in there) against spare, bristling folk-rock arrangements.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1991 | MIKE BOEHM
Besides the fact that they live in Orange County and play folk-based rock, Vinnie James and Richard Stekol would seem to have little in common. Stekol is a graying veteran who has seen his share of disappointments in a 20-year career dating back to his days with that band of local '70s heroes, Honk. His debut solo album, "Richard Stekol," is a quiet, introspective work released by a small, untested Orange County record company that will have to hustle and scratch to win it an airing.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1989 | MIKE BOEHM
Children grow up wishing that their skins were black or white Because you've taught them to believe that one was wrong and one was right. --From "Here Goes Tomorrow," by Vinnie James In a society knotted and distorted for 400 years by a tragic preoccupation with race, it is hardly surprising that music too becomes a matter of black and white. Vinnie James hopes that he can help dispel the fallacy that sound is circumscribed by color.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1986 | RANDY LEWIS, Times Staff Writer
In the ghettos of New York, "rumble" means a street fight between rival gangs. In the suburbs of Orange County, however, "rumble" usually refers to an earthquake. So the name Rumbletown, with its explosive, urban connotations, seems a peculiar choice for a band based in placid Orange County.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1997 | CHARLES SOLOMON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A mixture of low life and high tech, "Spicy City," Ralph Bakshi's new animated series debuting on HBO tonight, looks like the computer-generated metropolis in Disney's "Tron," seen from the wrong side of the track ball. According to a press release about "Spicy City," the show "updates the style and story lines of the pulp magazines of the 1930s and 1940s," but the first two episodes lack the tension and suspense of the stories of Dashiell Hammett and Raymond Chandler.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1990 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's hard to tell whether newcomer Vonda Shepard is a soul singer dressed in pop clothing, or vice versa. Whatever the pedigree of her hybrid sound, Shepard's song arrangements Wednesday night at the Coach House were dressed too slickly to make a deep impression. The 70-minute performance served as a showcase for an appealing voice that hasn't yet found the strong songs or the sympathetic musical surroundings that can turn promise into fulfillment.
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