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Vinod Dham

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BUSINESS
November 14, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
Advanced Micro Devices Inc.'s executive in charge of its microprocessor division resigned Thursday, raising concern about who will lead the computer chip maker's charge against rival Intel Corp. Vinod Dham, 47, was group vice president of AMD's computational products division, which makes the K6 processor. Dham worked for 16 years at Intel, where he headed the group that designed the company's best-selling Pentium chip.
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BUSINESS
November 14, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
Advanced Micro Devices Inc.'s executive in charge of its microprocessor division resigned Thursday, raising concern about who will lead the computer chip maker's charge against rival Intel Corp. Vinod Dham, 47, was group vice president of AMD's computational products division, which makes the K6 processor. Dham worked for 16 years at Intel, where he headed the group that designed the company's best-selling Pentium chip.
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BUSINESS
August 8, 2000 | KAREN ALEXANDER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In its largest and perhaps most important acquisition to date, Broadcom Corp. said Monday it would buy Silicon Spice Inc. in Northern California in a stock deal valued at more than $1.2 billion. Analysts said the deal will give Broadcom a powerful new presence in the fast-growing market for products that help carry information over wide areas, rather than within a single office or home.
BUSINESS
August 8, 2000 | KAREN ALEXANDER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In its largest and perhaps most important acquisition to date, Broadcom Corp. said Monday it would buy Silicon Spice Inc. in Northern California in a stock deal valued at more than $1.2 billion. Analysts said the deal will give Broadcom a powerful new presence in the fast-growing market for products that help carry information over wide areas, rather than within a single office or home.
BUSINESS
September 7, 1997 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wearing a glittering gold suit and tinted mask, Andy Grove assumed perhaps the most precarious position of his career: standing before an audience of thousands while holding one foot in the air. Then he stomped it down, and suddenly lights came up, music thumped and Grove--the 61-year-old chief executive of Intel Corp.--was the lead dancer in a parody of the company's disco-themed ad campaign.
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