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Vintage Clothing

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MAGAZINE
September 3, 1989 | JUDITH SIMS
CLOTHES FROM BYGONE days aren't only antique items to hang in a closet; they are pieces of history that can continue to adorn the wearer. They're well made, and their very age imparts style. Longevity counts. But old clothes in good condition can cost big bucks, especially the popular Victorian and Edwardian white cottons and slinky, bias-cut '30s gowns.
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NEWS
March 17, 2014 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
There's been an outpouring of reaction to the death of L'Wren Scott, the towering, 6-foot-4 fashion figure who started as a model, styled many of Hollywood's leading ladies for the red carpet and went on to create her own high-end clothing line that's been worn by actress Nicole Kidman and First Lady Michelle Obama, among other well-known fashion fans. Scott's assistant found her body in her apartment in New York's Chelsea neighborhood. Though there are widespread reports she was found hanged, police would say only that no criminal activity was suspected and the coroner is investigating.  Scott was romantically linked to Rolling Stones singer Mick Jagger and helped style the band's stage looks.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1995 | MAKI BECKER
A Marine Corps uniform from World War II and a beaded lace dress with matching hat from the 1940s were among the vintage clothing donated to Cal State Northridge by a private collector in Ohio. The clothes will be added to the university's collection of about 300 pieces used in the fashion design and merchandising program at CSUN. Other articles of donated clothing included a beaded jacket and several fur pieces from the turn of the century.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
When set decorator Claudette Didul needed to decorate Sally Draper's bedroom with 1960s-era clothing for an episode of "Mad Men" last season, she knew just the place. Didul went to Playclothes, a vintage clothing and furnishing store in Burbank, to buy an assortment of blouses, dresses, sweaters, pants and shoes to decorate the scene. "It's like a one-stop shop," Didul said. "It's really important for us to have stores like Playclothes. Their inventory is always changing, and I know I can get things I need the next day and that they will stay open for me if I have an emergency.
NEWS
May 16, 1990 | KAREN E. KLEIN, Klein is a regular contributor to San Gabriel Valley View
For fashion individualists who reject mall modes and haute couture dictates, San Gabriel Valley vintage clothing shops provide a reliable cache of one-of-a-kind apparel and accessories. A good place to begin an old-time clothing expedition is Lulu's Vintage Finery, located on Holly Street in Old Pasadena, down the way from a handful of other vintage clothing, antique and jewelry stores housed in historic buildings.
MAGAZINE
February 27, 2000 | Leslee Komaiko
Got any hot-pink leg warmers shoved in the sock drawer? Surprise! Evan Hughes, the 23-year-old senior buyer at the Wasteland on Melrose Avenue, wants them. His work at the vintage clothing store is intense, especially toward the end of the month, when, he points out, rents are due and sellers are out in force. Here are some highlights from a recent two-hour Saturday afternoon buying shift: * Noon. Buying begins. Edan, a regular, is first on the list.
NEWS
October 30, 1992 | GAILE ROBINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It used to be that anyone who loved '40s-era beaded sweater sets or '50s poodle skirts or Hawaiian shirts could rummage through the merchandise at one of several stores in Los Angeles and emerge victorious. And there was little doubt about where to go: a thrift store or, if you were willing to pay more, a resale shop, which traditionally carried the best merchandise culled from thrift shops. But these days, it's not so easy for ordinary shoppers to find vintage treasures.
NEWS
July 8, 1993 | DICK WAGNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eddie Greenspan stood dazed outside his store and held a picture of James Dean the flames had spared. Beyond the boarded-up doors, the clothes popular in Dean's era were soggy, black lumps. "I lost two-thirds of my stock," said Greenspan, who opened the store and named it for himself in 1939 when he was a teen-ager. "What can I say? No insurance. What am I going to do, sit down and cry? Who's going to cry with me, you know what I mean?"
NEWS
June 2, 1994 | ELLEN MELINKOFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A 1940s rayon dress can be a divine piece of work. Great geometric print. Bias cut. Exquisite detailing. It can also be pretty dowdy, ruined by a matronly neckline, cigarette burns, gruesome armpits. To the untrained eye, such a dress looks terminal. To others, unwilling to give up anything with a shred of life left in it, there are "possibilities." They see beyond the given. Beyond the dowdiness.
NEWS
July 11, 1993 | DICK WAGNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eddie Greenspan stood dazed outside his South Gate store and held a picture of James Dean that the flames had spared. Beyond the boarded-up doors, the clothes popular in Dean's era were in soggy, black lumps. "I lost two-thirds of my stock," said Greenspan, who opened the store and named it for himself in 1939 when he was a teen-ager. "What can I say? No insurance. What am I going to do, sit down and cry? Who's going to cry with me, you know what I mean?"
TRAVEL
August 24, 2012 | By Irene Lechowitzky
The long-neglected west end of downtown Napa is undergoing a resurgence, sparked by a stylish hotel that has blazed a trail for new restaurants, wine-tasting rooms and retail shops. No need for a car; you can walk to everything in this six-square-block area. Adding to the buzz is the Uptown Theatre, a restored Art Deco gem that is now an intimate concert hall featuring such name acts as Chris Isaak, Mother Hips and "Weird Al" Yankovic. The bed The Avia Napa (1450 1st St.; (707)
IMAGE
July 10, 2011 | By Jennifer Oldham, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Tory Varney donned the 80-year-old silk organdy gown replete with spaghetti straps and several dozen hook-and-eye closures cascading down the back moments after the vintage dress was unpacked by employees at the Way We Wore boutique in Los Angeles. "I do really love this," said Varney, 23, a music studio manager who plans to wed her college sweetheart this fall. "I didn't say that about anything at David's Bridal. " She's right in step with other young women, who are keeping the vintage trend of the last few years going strong.
IMAGE
July 10, 2011 | By Emili Vesilind, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Over the last decade, vintage shopping in Los Angeles has largely lost its sense of humor. What was once a discount-centered exercise in fashion excavation has slowly morphed into a sometimes expensive high-fashion endeavor — where a no-name secondhand frock can easily cost three times as much as its H&M facsimile. Blame it on Hollywood's ongoing love affair with vintage, along with global, online-based competition for designer vintage. Outbidding a Saudi princess on Prada usually verges on the impossible, after all. But a growing number of local vintage hounds are putting the reason back into resale — by ditching the pricey overhead of bricks-and-mortar stores and rolling out racks of secondhand finery in their living rooms.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2011 | By Charlotte Stoudt, Special to the Los Angeles Times
I'm on the city's surface streets, heading from downtown to Hollywood. Only a few cars share the road. I don't bother to pull onto the 101. Because it's not there. No, this isn't 3 a.m., or the apocalypse. It's L.A. Noire, the latest interactive world from Rockstar Games. In a dark suite at the Roosevelt Hotel, I'm test-driving this single-player detective thriller set in 1947 Los Angeles. Launching May 17, the graphic procedural takes place before Miranda rights and DNA testing.
IMAGE
April 17, 2011 | By Emili Vesilind, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The merchandise mix at Telltale Hearts, a cozy new fashion boutique in Silver Lake, could pass for the inside of any fashion-forward, farmers-market-going pretty young thing's closet in this L.A. neighborhood. The jewel box of a store has a lock on the area's penchant for eclectic dressing, mixing vintage pieces — mainly no-name dresses from the '70s and '80s and big, gold-toned '80s jewelry — with new tops and tees from edgy-but-pragmatic contemporary brands including Kain, Funktional and Seneca Rising.
IMAGE
April 17, 2011 | Steffie Nelson
Anyone who has set foot in Shareen Vintage, a vast downtown warehouse space lined with endless racks of sparkly cocktail frocks, gauzy hippie robes and an eclectic mix of other garments, will hardly be surprised to learn that the shop's owner, Shareen Mitchell, is starring in a new reality show, "Dresscue Me," premiering Tuesday on Discovery's Planet Green channel. Tall and blond with sculpted cheekbones and an imperious bearing that reflects her Seven Sisters education and thespian training, Mitchell also has a seventh sense for fashion.
IMAGE
July 10, 2011 | By Emili Vesilind, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Over the last decade, vintage shopping in Los Angeles has largely lost its sense of humor. What was once a discount-centered exercise in fashion excavation has slowly morphed into a sometimes expensive high-fashion endeavor — where a no-name secondhand frock can easily cost three times as much as its H&M facsimile. Blame it on Hollywood's ongoing love affair with vintage, along with global, online-based competition for designer vintage. Outbidding a Saudi princess on Prada usually verges on the impossible, after all. But a growing number of local vintage hounds are putting the reason back into resale — by ditching the pricey overhead of bricks-and-mortar stores and rolling out racks of secondhand finery in their living rooms.
IMAGE
February 27, 2011 | By Emili Vesilind, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Since closing his cult-favorite L.A. fashion boutique, Lo-Fi, in 2007, fashion designer, vintage apparel dealer and DJ Kelly Cole has been relatively content spinning records at trendy watering holes and selling clothing to top-flight stores, including American Rag Cie, Barneys New York and Confederacy. But gradually, the naturally social Cole began feeling like a lone wolf. "I started to miss people," he explained. "I deal with people in my DJ life, but at night it's a whole different rhythm.
TRAVEL
February 21, 2010 | By Andrew Bender
During a lull on a train from Amsterdam to Paris, it hit me. A group of Canadian backpackers was chatting with the Belgian conductor, and inevitably the subject of Canada's southern neighbor arose. The predictable sighs about American foreign policy were balanced by compliments about Americans' general good-heartedness -- until one of the Canadians offered a scalding criticism of American tourists' wardrobes. "Oh, please," I thought. "As if Winnipeg's such a fashion capital. " Then I looked down.
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