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SPORTS
September 3, 1988
Nothing disturbed me more than reading Chuck Peri's viewpoint (Aug. 20) about the NCAA's right to drug test athletes. As a collegiate athlete, I agree with the Superior Court judge's ruling that drug testing violates an individual's right to privacy, which is protected by the Bill of Rights. Peri seems more concerned about the rights of the NCAA. He seems to be forgetting the simple issue at hand here. In my view, the human side. JOHN BRANDOLINO Los Angeles
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - State authorities Thursday imposed $40,000 in fines against Sen. Tom Berryhill (R-Modesto) and two GOP committees after finding that the lawmaker laundered that amount of political money into his brother's 2008 Assembly campaign. The state Fair Political Practices Commission voted unanimously to uphold an administrative law judge's ruling that Berryhill committed a "serious and deliberate" violation of California's campaign finance laws. The commissioners decided in a 20-minute closed session to include in the fines the Stanislaus County and San Joaquin County Republican central committees for their role as conduits in passing $40,000 from Berryhill to his brother's successful campaign.
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OPINION
July 14, 2010 | By Robert P. Murphy
In his July 6 Op-Ed, law professor Ray D. Madoff made a case for the estate tax, claiming that it promoted tax fairness and economic growth. Madoff is wrong on both counts. The estate tax violates common principles of justice and stifles economic growth. Congress should permanently lock in this year's special moratorium on the estate tax. One standard argument against the estate tax is that the wealth of the estate was already taxed (perhaps several times over) while being accumulated.
BUSINESS
April 20, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - A longtime board member of the country's largest public pension fund is in trouble again with California's political watchdog. Priya Mathur, board vice president of the $288-billion California Public Employees' Retirement System, has a penchant for not filing timely reports to the Fair Political Practices Commission. And she failed again for 2012 and 2013. Since she was first elected in 2002, Mathur, a financial analyst for the Bay Area Rapid Transit District, has been fined $13,000 for five reporting violations.
NEWS
October 17, 2003 | Patrick McGreevy, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles city prosecutors are looking to recall the governor-elect -- or, more precisely, a large advertising mural of Arnold Schwarzenegger that they say was put up illegally this week on the side of a building in the Cahuenga Pass. The city attorney's office filed six misdemeanor criminal charges Thursday against Robert Lusk Davis, the owner of a building in the 3200 block of Cahuenga Boulevard West after a towering mural was painted on one wall of the structure to promote the upcoming DVD and video release of Schwarzenegger's latest film, "Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines."
SPORTS
June 14, 1989
Guard Dale Ellis of the Seattle SuperSonics was fined $346 after being found guilty of assaulting his wife and resisting arrest during a January incident at his home. Ellis was ordered to see a counselor and fined at the non-jury trial before Judge Brian Gain. If Ellis does not commit another crime for a year, the convictions will be stricken from his record. If Ellis violates any of the conditions set by Gain during the next year, the judge can sentence him to 15 months in jail and increase the fine to $6,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2001
It is the height of irresponsibility for a commentator of professor Alan Dershowitz's prominence to assert (Commentary, Nov. 8) that "any interrogation technique, including the use of truth serum or even torture, is not prohibited" under the Constitution. The Constitution prohibits "cruel and unusual punishment," that is, torture. Furthermore, torture--a form of aggravated battery--violates the criminal law in every jurisdiction in the U.S., and the police are not exempt from these laws.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
RealNetworks can't sell a program that copies DVDs to computer hard disks because it may violate copyright laws, a federal judge said. The Motion Picture Assn. of America, which contends the Seattle company's RealDVD program will facilitate piracy, persuaded U.S. District Judge Marilyn Hall Patel to keep in place an Oct. 4 temporary restraining order. Patel said she would hold a hearing on whether the product violates federal copyright laws.
OPINION
July 1, 2005
Re "Firms Can Be Held Liable for Net Piracy," June 28: How dare the U.S. Supreme Court rule that file sharing is theft of intellectual property! Thou shalt not steal is found nowhere in the Constitution. Most youths play their music religiously. Consequently, this simultaneously violates the court's own rulings on age discrimination and the expressed freedom our Constitution guarantees in the practice of one's own religion. Scott Tucker Monterey Park
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1988
The column discusses the pros and cons a judge faces in dealing with irresponsible mothers who are capable of bearing children but sadly lack the emotional control and character regarded a necessary by society for successful parenting. In the case he cites, the judge gave the mother guilty of felony child abuse a sentence of furnishing "written proof" that she is using birth control or if she fails to comply she will be sent back to prison. The crux of the matter rests on whether or not such governmental control violates personal rights; in other words is such a sentence constitutional?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2014 | By Jason Song
Jewel Wade remembers the tense atmosphere at Compton Community College in 2006, when it was rumored the school would close. "The whole school was kind of depressing because nobody knew what was going on," Wade recalled Tuesday. State officials did strip the school of its accreditation and turned the campus into a satellite of a nearby two-year college. The $25-million library, which had been set to open in 2007, was found to be plagued with code violations and sat unused for nearly seven years before finally opening late last month after undergoing extensive renovations that cost an additional $4 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By Los Angeles Times Staff
A homeless man convicted of trespassing at Selena Gomez's home was charged Monday with stalking and violating a court order to stay away from the former Disney star. The charges filed against Che Cruz come just days after he pleaded no contest to trespassing at Gomez's home, after which he was sentenced to 45 days in Los Angeles County jail and ordered to stay away from the star's home. Cruz, 20, was arrested March 30 inside a bathroom of a guest house on the property being purchased by Gomez, 21, authorities said.
BUSINESS
April 2, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - Pacific Gas & Electric Co., indicted by the federal government for criminal behavior stemming from a Bay Area natural gas explosion that killed eight people and destroyed 38 homes, still faces more trouble. In the next few months, PG&E will face the likelihood of a fine from the California Public Utilities Commission as high as $2.25 billion for its role in the September 2010 disaster in the city of San Bruno. On Tuesday, the U.S. attorney in San Francisco announced that a grand jury indicted PG&E on 12 alleged violations of the federal Pipeline Safety Act involving poor record keeping and faulty management practices.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2014 | By Robert J. Lopez
Utility giant Pacific Gas & Electric Co. was indicted Tuesday on a dozen felony counts connected to the massive 2010 pipeline explosion that killed eight people and ravaged a San Bruno, Calif., neighborhood. The utility was charged with violating federal pipeline safety laws, including failing to identify all potential threats to the aging, high-pressure line that sparked the disaster and not maintaining proper repair records, according to the indictment filed in U.S. District Court in San Francisco.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2014 | By Jessica Garrison
A Vernon battery recycler under fire for contaminating nearby homes with lead and threatening the health of more than 100,000 people with its arsenic emissions is in trouble once again for emitting more than the permitted level of lead, according to the South Coast Air Quality Management District. As a result, the agency will order Exide to curtail its operations by 15%. On March 22 and 23, an air monitor on the northeast side of the Exide Technologies plant, near the Los Angeles River, picked up lead levels that were high enough to cause the outdoor air concentration to exceed 0.15 micrograms per cubic meter based on a 30-day average - a violation of rules designed to protect public health.
BUSINESS
March 26, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
The World Trade Organization on Wednesday said that China's restrictions on the exports of rare earths -- raw materials commonly used in the manufacturing of electronics -- violate trade rules. China had argued that the restrictions, which included export duties and quotas, were in place to conserve exhaustible natural resources, but other countries disagreed. The United States two years ago complained to the World Trade Organization about the restrictions, arguing that they artificially raised the prices of rare earths for other countries and gave preferable pricing to Chinese manufacturers.
OPINION
October 4, 1987
I'm having trouble reconciling two recent current events: - The United States violates international law and places mines off of Nicaragua. - The United States fires on an Iranian ship placing mines in the Persian Gulf, citing Iranian violation of international law. Maybe it's because the President and the ayatollah are so much alike they can't get along on a personal level. Maybe the President simply forgot we had mined Nicaragua. Maybe he thought he was talking to South Africa's prime minister when he said, "Shoot the miners."
BUSINESS
March 1, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
A divided Virginia Supreme Court affirmed the nation's first felony conviction for illegal spamming, ruling that Virginia's anti-spamming law does not violate free-speech rights. Jeremy Jaynes of Raleigh, N.C., considered among the world's top spammers, was convicted of massive distribution of junk e-mail and sentenced to nine years in prison. In the 4-3 ruling, the court rejected Jaynes' claim that the state law violates both the 1st Amendment and the U.S. Constitution's interstate commerce clause.
NEWS
March 25, 2014 | By Luke O'Neil, guest blogger
This week a video emerged online of a man BASE-jumping from the top of New York's 1 World Trade Center. The video is a lot of things: Thrilling and frightening. Extremely stupid also comes to mind. Yet another way of looking at it is as a grave desecration of hallowed ground, a veritable slap in the face to our collective national pain. That's the response the Port Authority, which owns and operates the building, had to the video, and to the news that the four men involved in the jump had turned themselves into police on Monday . “The Port Authority joins the NYPD in condemning this lawless and selfish act that clearly endangered the public,” the agency said in a statement . “One of the jumpers worked construction at the WTC and violated the spirit of respect and reverence for this sacred site that almost all connected with the WTC project feel.” James Brady, Kyle Hartwell, Marco Markovich and Andrew Rossig, three of whom parachuted from the top of the country's tallest tower in September, have been charged with felony burglary, misdemeanor reckless endangerment and misdemeanor jumping from a structure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2014 | By Hector Becerra
The troubled Central Basin Municipal Water District violated the state's open-meeting laws when it created a $2.7-million fund in virtual secrecy, an investigation by the agency's attorneys concluded. The fund, created for a groundwater storage project, was managed without public hearings or notifications, and records related to it were among those subpoenaed by federal prosecutors. The subpoenas came after an FBI raid on the Sacramento offices of state Sen. Ron Calderon (D-Montebello)
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