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Violence Against Women Act

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NEWS
March 7, 2013 | By Wes Venteicher
WASHINGTON -- President Barack Obama signed into law Thursday the Violence Against Women Act, formally ending a battle fought in Congress in the last year over controversial changes to the act. In a public ceremony in Washington, Obama said this year's legislation expands an act that has altered the culture surrounding domestic violence in America. The bill extends federal aid to gay, immigrant and tribal victims, while adding services for its original beneficiaries and a large voting bloc: women.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 18, 2014 | By Michael McGough
What does the federal Violence Against Women Act have to do with outlawing discrimination against gays and lesbians? A good deal, it turns out. The latest version of the law, which among other things provides grants to agencies that deal with victims of sexual assaults, has a nondiscrimination provision. It says that recipients may not discriminate in their hiring on the basis of “actual or perceived race, color, religion, national origin, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, or disability.” The Justice Department recently released a briefing paper on implementation of the law. There is a limited exception for necessary “sex-specific programming.” Also, religious agencies, consistent with the Religion Freedom Restoration Act, may prefer members of their own faith in hiring.
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NEWS
April 26, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON -- Sidestepping a politically dangerous fight, Senate Republicans made temporary peace with Democrats to approve the reauthorization of a popular law designed to help prevent and respond to domestic and sexual abuse. Passage of the Violence Against Women Act on a 68-31 vote gives momentum to the legislation, which would reauthorize more than $650 million in programs. Fifteen Republicans joined Democrats in passage. But the bill still faces hurdles in the House, where Republican leaders plan to offer an alternative proposal.
NEWS
July 22, 2013 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON -- At a summer lunch with reporters in her Capitol conference room, Rep. Nancy Pelosi rolled out an ambitious economic agenda for women with next year's congressional elections in mind. She launched a legislative agenda of family-friendly policies, such as paycheck fairness for women, an increased federal minimum wage, and President Obama's proposed early childhood education initiative. The Democrats' agenda, coming as the legislative season begins to make way for next year's campaigns, was designed to stand in contrast to bills being debated under the GOP majority on the House floor.
NEWS
February 28, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON -- The Republican-led House of Representatives voted overwhelmingly Thursday to support the Senate version of the Violence Against Women Act, ending a yearlong battle on Capitol Hill to reauthorize legislation targeting domestic violence. The bill expands protections to include same-sex couples, immigrants and Native Americans. President Obama is expected to quickly sign the bill into law, which comes nearly two decades after enactment of the initial law, which was authored by then-Sen.
NEWS
February 12, 2013 | By Wes Venteicher
WASHINGTON -- With broad support from the U.S. Senate, legislation to renew and expand the Violence Against Women Act is heading to the House of Representatives, where a previous renewal bid failed over Republican concerns about new services for gay, immigrant and Native American victims of domestic violence. The Senate's 78-22 vote Tuesday afternoon reauthorizing the act extends central provisions such as funding for investigation and prosecution of violent crimes against women while also expanding services for the groups it did not previously serve.
NEWS
February 7, 2013 | By Wes Venteicher
Washington - The Senate on Thursday rejected a Republican proposal to prevent federal aid from being spent on immigrant, gay and Native American victims of domestic violence, the key objections that have so far help up Congressional reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act. The Senate on Monday will again take up reauthorization of the measure, which expired at the end of 2011. The act, which Congress has reauthorized twice with bipartisan support since it was created in 1994, funds investigation and prosecution of violent crimes against women.
OPINION
March 1, 2013
After more than a year of bitter partisan fighting, Congress on Thursday finally reauthorized the Violence Against Women Act, including new provisions that will extend the law's protections for gay, lesbian, transgender and Native American victims of domestic violence. It's about time. There is no rational explanation for why lawmakers took so long to reauthorize this legislation, which was first enacted in 1994 and had been renewed twice with broad bipartisan support. Admittedly, the revised law covers a broader group of victims.
NATIONAL
October 18, 2009 | Sara Olkon
Kathy Cleaves-Milan called police to report that her live-in boyfriend had brandished a gun and vowed to end both of their lives. Within days, her apartment managers served her with eviction papers for violating the terms of the lease, citing the criminal activity she had reported. "I was punished for protecting myself and my daughter," Cleaves-Milan, 36, said. Earlier this month, her attorneys filed a lawsuit arguing that her 2007 eviction was a form of sex discrimination. A representative of Aimco, the company that owned and operated the apartment complex, said the eviction wasn't solely about the domestic violence but also involved Cleaves-Milan's ability to afford the rent if her boyfriend moved out -- an assertion she strongly rejected.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2000
Re "For Too Many Women, Home Is a Place of Assault and Pain," Ventura County Perspective, Oct. 8. Gina Gutierrez writes of the many sadly needed things we can do, and others are doing, to eliminate domestic violence. She and your readers should know too that funding for programs supported by the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 is due to expire this month. Funds granted under this act make possible the efforts of many churches and other organizations to support the special needs of domestic violence victims.
NATIONAL
April 2, 2013 | By Paul West, Washington Bureau
- Hillary Rodham Clinton returned to the public stage Tuesday night for the opening scene in what many expect to be a carefully plotted performance concluding with another presidential try. The high-profile venue: the Kennedy Center in the nation's capital. Several dozen mostly student-age supporters of a Clinton presidential run rallied outside, brandishing blue-and-white "I'm Ready for Hillary" placards. But the event inside was strictly nonpartisan: an awards gala for an international women's rights organization that Clinton had helped create.
NEWS
March 7, 2013 | By Wes Venteicher
WASHINGTON -- President Barack Obama signed into law Thursday the Violence Against Women Act, formally ending a battle fought in Congress in the last year over controversial changes to the act. In a public ceremony in Washington, Obama said this year's legislation expands an act that has altered the culture surrounding domestic violence in America. The bill extends federal aid to gay, immigrant and tribal victims, while adding services for its original beneficiaries and a large voting bloc: women.
OPINION
March 1, 2013
After more than a year of bitter partisan fighting, Congress on Thursday finally reauthorized the Violence Against Women Act, including new provisions that will extend the law's protections for gay, lesbian, transgender and Native American victims of domestic violence. It's about time. There is no rational explanation for why lawmakers took so long to reauthorize this legislation, which was first enacted in 1994 and had been renewed twice with broad bipartisan support. Admittedly, the revised law covers a broader group of victims.
NEWS
February 28, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON -- The Republican-led House of Representatives voted overwhelmingly Thursday to support the Senate version of the Violence Against Women Act, ending a yearlong battle on Capitol Hill to reauthorize legislation targeting domestic violence. The bill expands protections to include same-sex couples, immigrants and Native Americans. President Obama is expected to quickly sign the bill into law, which comes nearly two decades after enactment of the initial law, which was authored by then-Sen.
NATIONAL
February 28, 2013 | By Lisa Mascaro and Wes Venteicher, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - House Speaker John A. Boehner rose to power on the conservative tea party revolt, but the Ohio Republican is proving on many issues to be Washington's most flexible speaker in years - a reluctant bipartisan. On top issues, when the hard-charging rhetoric came to a close, Boehner repeatedly has done something recent predecessors in both parties generally refused to do: He has left his intransigent troops behind and reached across the aisle to pass legislation. The latest example came Thursday as the House approved President Obama's preferred version of the Violence Against Women Act. The speaker allowed the bill to come to the floor after he was unable to rally votes for a more limited Republican alternative.
NATIONAL
February 12, 2013 | By Wes Venteicher, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - With broad support from the Senate, legislation to renew and expand the Violence Against Women Act is heading to the House, where a previous renewal bid failed over Republican concerns about new services for gay, immigrant and Native American victims of domestic violence. The Senate's 78-22 vote Tuesday reauthorizing the act extends central provisions, such as funding for investigation and prosecution of violent crimes against women, while also expanding services to groups it did not previously serve.
NATIONAL
May 14, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Starting next year, adult rape victims too afraid or too ashamed to go to police can undergo an emergency-room forensic rape exam, and the evidence gathered will be kept on file in a sealed envelope in case they decide to press charges. The new federal requirement that states pay for "Jane Doe rape kits" is aimed at removing one of the biggest obstacles to prosecuting rape cases: Some women are so traumatized they don't come forward until it is too late to document their injuries and collect hair, semen or other samples.
NEWS
February 12, 2013 | By Wes Venteicher
WASHINGTON -- With broad support from the U.S. Senate, legislation to renew and expand the Violence Against Women Act is heading to the House of Representatives, where a previous renewal bid failed over Republican concerns about new services for gay, immigrant and Native American victims of domestic violence. The Senate's 78-22 vote Tuesday afternoon reauthorizing the act extends central provisions such as funding for investigation and prosecution of violent crimes against women while also expanding services for the groups it did not previously serve.
NEWS
February 7, 2013 | By Wes Venteicher
Washington - The Senate on Thursday rejected a Republican proposal to prevent federal aid from being spent on immigrant, gay and Native American victims of domestic violence, the key objections that have so far help up Congressional reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act. The Senate on Monday will again take up reauthorization of the measure, which expired at the end of 2011. The act, which Congress has reauthorized twice with bipartisan support since it was created in 1994, funds investigation and prosecution of violent crimes against women.
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