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NEWS
September 3, 1998 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The British and Irish parliaments were called back from summer recess Wednesday to rush through tough anti-terrorism legislation aimed at jailing violent opponents of the Northern Ireland peace accord, such as those responsible for a recent bombing that killed 28 people in the province.
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NEWS
September 3, 1998 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The British and Irish parliaments were called back from summer recess Wednesday to rush through tough anti-terrorism legislation aimed at jailing violent opponents of the Northern Ireland peace accord, such as those responsible for a recent bombing that killed 28 people in the province.
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OPINION
May 1, 1988 | Sally Belfrage, Sally Belfrage is the author of "Living With War: A Belfast Year" (Viking)
"It was pretty bad for a time there," people say all over Belfast about the events of the spring. But there is a parochialism in Northern Ireland; what, exactly, was "pretty bad" depends on where you are. For the Catholic Republicans, it began when their team of three was shot dead in the streets of Gibraltar by a British commando unit.
OPINION
May 1, 1988 | Sally Belfrage, Sally Belfrage is the author of "Living With War: A Belfast Year" (Viking)
"It was pretty bad for a time there," people say all over Belfast about the events of the spring. But there is a parochialism in Northern Ireland; what, exactly, was "pretty bad" depends on where you are. For the Catholic Republicans, it began when their team of three was shot dead in the streets of Gibraltar by a British commando unit.
NEWS
August 18, 1991 | Associated Press
A British soldier on patrol in south Armagh was killed Saturday by a bomb, the eighth victim in nine days of escalating sectarian violence in Northern Ireland. The bombing was blamed on the Irish Republican Army.
NEWS
March 22, 1990 | United Press International
A Protestant man was shot to death in front of his family and two others were wounded in a new wave of sectarian violence in Northern Ireland, police said Wednesday.
NEWS
July 8, 1999 | Associated Press
Raising fears of street violence, Northern Ireland's conservative Protestant brotherhood announced surprise plans Wednesday to parade 20,000 members near a hostile Catholic part of this provincial capital. The Orange Order said members of its Belfast lodges would march in solidarity Monday to the spot where British authorities already have barred a much smaller group of Orangemen from parading past the Catholic enclave of Lower Ormeau.
NEWS
March 4, 1985
Irish Republican Army gunmen shot to death a Roman Catholic policeman in front of his wife and three children as he arrived at a church to sing in a choir, police said. He was the 11th policeman to die in violence in Northern Ireland in two weeks. A police spokesman said two men attacked Sgt. Hugh McCormac, 40, in Enniskillen, about 70 miles southwest of Belfast. The IRA issued a statement taking responsibility.
NEWS
September 19, 1986 | From Reuters
Foreign Minister Peter Barry signed an agreement with Britain on Thursday, setting up an international fund to channel financial aid, mainly from North America, to areas affected by the sectarian violence in Northern Ireland. The fund, which will start off with $50 million from the United States, is part of the Anglo-Irish accord that gives the Irish government a voice in the running of British-ruled Northern Ireland.
NEWS
August 24, 1990 | Reuters
Britain's official war artist is following his country's forces into the Persian Gulf armed with sketchbook and camera. "It is one of those quaint British traditions . . . sending artists to a war zone," said John Keane, whose work includes paintings of the Nicaraguan conflict and violence in Northern Ireland. Keane has received a $19,000 commission from the Imperial War Museum in London to go to the gulf and add to the museum's collection of 12,000 war paintings.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 1987 | JOHN VOLAND, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The British Broadcasting Corp. announced that its Buckingham Palace reporter breached official policy last week by leaking advance information about Queen Elizabeth II's Christmas Day message. A BBC spokesman said Monday that the reporter, Michael Cole, will be reassigned from Buckingham Palace. At a private luncheon with other journalists on Friday, Cole revealed that the queen planned to speak against violence in Northern Ireland.
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