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NEWS
May 25, 1999 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Using as its model Mothers Against Drunk Driving, the group that transformed drunken-driving laws across the country, a new national organization aimed at preventing gun death and injury will make its debut today at press conferences in eight cities, from Honolulu to New York. The Bell Campaign bills itself as a grass-roots counterpoint to the National Rifle Assn., with education and advocacy as its primary goals.
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NEWS
May 25, 1999 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Using as its model Mothers Against Drunk Driving, the group that transformed drunken-driving laws across the country, a new national organization aimed at preventing gun death and injury will make its debut today at press conferences in eight cities, from Honolulu to New York. The Bell Campaign bills itself as a grass-roots counterpoint to the National Rifle Assn., with education and advocacy as its primary goals.
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WORLD
September 14, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Up to 10,000 people, many of them children, are dying each month from disease and violence in Darfur camps, despite an international aid effort, the World Health Organization said. The study was carried out by the WHO and the Sudanese government. Dysentery was the leading cause of death, but violence was also significant, although the survey did not go into detail on the nature of the violence.
NEWS
March 2, 1996 | The Washington Post
President Clinton agreed Friday to let Irish Republican Army ally Gerry Adams travel to the United States later this month for St. Patrick's Day, a sign that the administration has retained its confidence in him despite a recent wave of bombings by the IRA. Adams, the head of Sinn Fein, the legal political wing of the IRA, applied for and was granted a restricted visa that allows him to travel here but not to conduct any fund-raising activities.
NEWS
May 15, 1990 | From Associated Press
Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir on Monday ordered the gradual reopening of six Palestinian universities in the Israeli-occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip that have been closed for more than two years. The move is likely to improve Israel's relations with the United States. They have been strained in recent weeks over Shamir's increasing Jewish settlement activity in the occupied lands. The army closed the six universities shortly after a Palestinian uprising broke out in December, 1987.
NEWS
November 24, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
Two bombs exploded in a suburb of Haiti's capital Thursday, killing a 7-year-old girl on her way to school and injuring two other people in a second day of violence ahead of Sunday's presidential election. The bombs exploded in separate locations in suburban Carrefour, the independent Radio Metropole reported. Police defused a third bomb found across the street from the Organization of American States headquarters in the upscale neighborhood of Petionville.
OPINION
July 11, 2002
Egypt's foreign minister said several weeks ago that his nation was "trying to build a liberal democratic system in difficult circumstances" and it was not easy. The government of President Hosni Mubarak, apparently intent on keeping his autocratic rule safe, is no help.
NEWS
May 6, 1988 | Associated Press
Police arrested an Arab-American leader of the Palestinian civil disobedience movement and ordered him deported, Israeli officials said today. A government spokesman accused him of advocating violence. The United States asked Israel to delay the deportation of Mubarak Awad, who was arrested at his Jerusalem home at midnight, while U.S. Ambassador Thomas Pickering met with Foreign Minister Shimon Peres and asked Israel to reconsider the order, Israel television reported.
NATIONAL
March 13, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
With drug-related violence growing along the Mexico border, the U.S. is willing to consider deploying troops to the Southwest -- but only as a last resort -- a Department of Homeland Security official told members of Congress on Thursday. Help might come from the National Guard or even the Army if the deadly threat from Mexico's powerful cartels gets so bad that Homeland Security officials cannot secure border towns, Roger Rufe, the department's director of operations, told a House subcommittee.
NATIONAL
December 18, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - A man with dual U.S. and Syrian citizenship was added to the FBI's most-wanted terrorists list Wednesday after eluding arrest for four years on charges of making at least three trips to Pakistan and Yemen to undergo jihad training to kill U.S. troops overseas. Ahmad Abousamra, who grew up in the Boston area and is believed to be hiding in Syria's largest city, Aleppo, has been sought since November 2009 on a federal arrest warrant issued in Boston. He is accused of conspiring to kill in a foreign country and providing material support to a terrorist organization.
NATIONAL
December 24, 2012 | By David Horsey
I was at a holiday party on Friday when the subject of gun control reared its head somewhere between the appetizer table and the wine bar. The host -- my friend Alan -- is a Canadian who thinks the American attitude toward guns borders on the insane. While Canada, with tight limits on gun ownership, is relatively free of gun violence, the United States, awash in enough guns to arm every man, woman and child in the country, suffers repeated incidents of gun-related killings -- most recently the horrific slaughter of 6- and 7-year-olds in Newtown, Conn.
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