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Violence

ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Quentin Tarantino has been getting asked a lot about the link between movie violence and real-life violence lately, especially since his new film "Django Unchained" features an over-the-top massacre. But, he finally lost it when a British TV interviewer attempted to broach the subject recently. The director appeared on Britain's Channel 4 this week with interviewer Krishnan Guru-Murthy to discuss his latest film. Though Tarantino was happy to discuss the picture's brutal look at slavery in America's past (a topic he bragged he single-handedly brought back into the national discussion)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1985
This is for Doug Gettinger (Letters, Nov. 21), who suggested that Terry Chow (Letters, Nov. 2) eliminate violence in children's cartoons by turning off the set. That may work for the Chow children, but what about the millions of other kids who are growing up on a steady diet of guts and gore? Let them all turn off their sets, you say? Gettinger is missing the point. We can close our eyes to all that is unpleasant in our lives, from cartoons to major catastrophes, but surely even Gettinger can see that that doesn't make for a very progressive society.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1992
The problem with Wilmington is there's too much violence going on. Recently, a man was stabbed to death and later a man was shot and killed near my house. I feel scared living in Wilmington because I might die. I think people should get together and stop gangs and drugs. I don't know why people kill each other. We're all equal. No one's better than anyone. My mom says she wants me and my brother to be someone big when we grow up. She says don't let drugs or gangs get in my way. My cousin was killed because of gangs.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2013 | By Yvonne Villarreal
Once upon a midnight dreary, Kevin Williamson became weak and weary--fielding questions on the violence seen in Fox's upcoming horror drama “The Following.” The creator and executive producer, who is also behind the CW's “The Vampire Diaries” and slasher flick “Scream,” was hit with questions Tuesday about the drama's dark and brutal content during the Television Critics Assn. press tour - a topic he, surprisingly, didn't seem quite prepared to discuss, trailing off or saying he couldn't hear questions.  (At one point, in what seemed a bid to distract from the weighty topic that had overrun the panel, its leads Kevin Bacon and James Purefoy gave each other a playful smooch after a reporter brought up their palpable chemistry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1989
Goldstein's assertion that pornography doesn't cause violence needs to be answered. Aside from the fact that pornography is violence in itself, research proves it provokes countless crimes against women, children and young men. As Kirk points out, a 1985 FBI study of 36 serial murderers showed that 81% "said their biggest sexual interest was in reading pornography." Pornography's defenders should talk with James Weaver, who recently completed a landmark study at the University of Indiana.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
In one of the most infamous scenes in modern drama, a group of young men in a London park stone a baby to death in its carriage. What begins as roughhousing escalates to all-out sadism until a rock is thrown at point blank range, ending the child's pitiful cries for good. Edward Bond's "Saved" provoked outrage when it was produced in 1965 by the Royal Court Theatre as a private club offering, a designation used to slip past the Lord Chamberlain's Office. Although "Saved" isn't revived often, it's considered a modern classic, and not just because it was instrumental in overturning Britain's strict theater censorship laws.
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