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Violence

WORLD
January 30, 2014 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY -- Since a 2009 coup overthrew the president of Honduras, journalists have been killed, intimidated or silenced with virtual impunity, a new report concludes. In a country with an extraordinarily high murder rate , at least 36 journalists have been killed in the last four years, the report notes, and rarely has a case been seriously investigated, a suspect arrested or anyone punished. “In the new climate of fear, few journalists trust the institutions that should shield them from further violence,” PEN International and several partner groups said in an exhaustive, 89-page study released this month.
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WORLD
January 23, 2014 | By Victoria Butenko and Sergei L. Loiko
KIEV, Ukraine -- The Ukrainian opposition announced Thursday that it had reached agreement with President Viktor Yanukovich on a partial compromise aimed at ending the country's worst political crisis since the breakup of the Soviet Union and stopping the bloodshed in its streets. Opposition leader and former world heavyweight boxing champion Vitali  Klitschko announced the deal to protesters on Grushevsky Street after five hours of talks with Yanukovich at his Kiev residence. Grushevsky Street has been the focus of more than four days of violence, in which more than 200 people on both sides have been injured and at least three protesters have died.
WORLD
January 21, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
Thai officials proclaimed a state of emergency Tuesday to contain increasingly violent anti-government protesters trying to oust Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra and derail an election she has called. The 60-day emergency state gives the government sweeping powers to impose curfews, ban public gatherings, censor news media and arrest people without charges or warrants, news agencies reported in Bangkok, the capital. Yingluck's embattled government needs the emergency measure " to take care of the situation ," said Deputy Prime Minister Surapong Tovichakchaikul, the Bangkok Post reported.
WORLD
January 21, 2014 | By Zaid Ali and Laura King, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
SANA, Yemen -- In the latest in a spate of assassinations in Yemen, gunmen on Tuesday shot and killed a leading member of a Shiite Muslim group on his way to reconciliation talks and a senior advisor to a provincial governor was slain by a bomb planted in his car, security officials said. A third political figure, the son of the secretary-general of an Islamic party, survived an attempt on his life, officials said. The attacks came against a backdrop of unrest that has torn Yemen in the wake of the 2011 ouster of longtime President Ali Abdullah Saleh, who stepped down after popular protests erupted across the Arab world, including in Yemen.
WORLD
January 21, 2014 | By Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY - It is known here as the “ cucaracha effect,” the possibility that a heavy government crackdown in one part of Mexico will simply send the bad guys scurrying off, cockroach-like, to some other place and cause new trouble. There was intense concern Tuesday that members of the violent drug cartel called the Knights Templar were flowing out of their home base in Michoacan , the southwestern state to which federal police and troops were deployed last week to bring order to areas the cartel has long dominated.
WORLD
January 20, 2014 | Victoria Butenko and Sergei L. Loiko
Defying a government crackdown, tens of thousands of opposition demonstrators took to the streets of the Ukrainian capital on Sunday, clashing violently with police. With protesters throwing stones, flares and Molotov cocktails, riot squads fought back with water cannons, tear gas and noise grenades in an attempt to put down the demonstration, which lasted well into Monday morning. Many demonstrators protected themselves with helmets and shields. Dozens of people were reported injured on both sides.
OPINION
January 19, 2014 | By Luke Glowacki
Do genes make us do it? The idea that human behavior is driven by genes makes many people uncomfortable, and nowhere is the dispute more bitter than when discussing the biological underpinnings of violence. The war of ideas over violence and human nature has raged since the 1600s, when philosopher Thomas Hobbes first speculated that the "natural condition of mankind" was one of violence and conflict. In the 1700s, Jean-Jacques Rousseau saw things differently. Enthralled with accounts of the New World, he argued that civilization, not nature, shaped the human propensity for violence.
WORLD
January 18, 2014 | By Kate Linthicum
JERUSALEM -- Israeli airstrikes hit two Hamas training facilities in the Gaza Strip early Sunday after a rocket landed in Israeli territory, witnesses and security officials said. No injuries were reported. The Israeli military said it launched the attack after a rocket landed Saturday night in the Sdot Negev Regional Council, a town in the northwestern Negev desert that is a short distance from Gaza. Hamas, the military faction that controls Gaza, said on its website that two of its military camps “were destroyed by the Israeli warplanes.” The attacks come after a week of intensifying cross-border violence.
OPINION
January 17, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Gains by Al Qaeda-allied groups in Iraq - including in Fallouja, the site of a bloody U.S. offensive in 2004 - understandably anger Americans who lost loved ones in a "war of choice" that was supposed to secure democracy in that country. But the continued violence in Iraq doesn't discredit the decision of the United States to withdraw troops, nor does it justify any new deployment. Even now, the United States has an interest in Iraq's future and seeks to influence events there. The Obama administration, with congressional support, has expedited the delivery of military equipment to the government of Prime Minister Nouri Maliki to be used against the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, the Al Qaeda-affiliated group that seized large portions of Fallouja.
WORLD
January 14, 2014 | By Richard Fausset and Cecilia Sanchez
MEXICO CITY - Mexican troops and federal police poured into the state of Michoacan on Tuesday in an attempt to restore order after clashes with the rural "self-defense" groups that at times have been their allies against the Knights Templar drug cartel. The standoff with the vigilantes amounts to a policy and public relations nightmare for a federal government that has long accorded mythic status to the Mexican campesino who takes up arms to combat injustice. The Michoacan vigilantes have embraced the image, though there is widespread suspicion that at least some of the locals are secretly backed by rivals in the deadly drug game.
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