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Violeta Barrios Chamorro

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NEWS
September 7, 1990 | Associated Press
President Violeta Barrios de Chamorro has canceled a planned October trip to the United States because of the Persian Gulf crisis, a government spokesman said Thursday.
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October 6, 1996 | Frank del Olmo, Frank del Olmo, assistant to the editor of The Times and a regular columnist, covered the Nicaraguan revolution as a foreign correspondent
Practically every nation in Latin America has felt put upon by the United States--the so-called "Colossus of the North"--at one time or other. But few Latin American nations have suffered longer, or more terribly, as a result of Yanqui intervention than Nicaragua.
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NEWS
December 30, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Violeta Barrios Chamorro, the leading opposition presidential candidate in Nicaragua, said she received death threats after the government announced that backers of any U.S. invasion would be executed. Chamorro, candidate for the National Opposition Union, said several anonymous callers cited the Defense Ministry communique "that practically justifies violent and indiscriminate acts against people fighting for democracy in this country." Chamorro said death threats would not stop her campaign.
NEWS
May 27, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The last time President Violeta Barrios de Chamorro tried to fire Gen. Humberto Ortega, the powerful army chief lashed out publicly at government officials for having "sold out" to pressure from Washington. He refused to budge. Months later, Ortega has finally agreed to step down, having successfully delayed his retirement date by more than a year.
NEWS
February 20, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
German Chancellor Helmut Kohl pledged substantial development aid to Nicaragua after talks with President Violeta Barrios de Chamorro in Bonn, but the amount was not announced. Bonn sources said Chamorro will also discuss the $500 million that Nicaragua owes to the former East Germany and a large amount of Nicaraguan property that was sold to East Germany after being confiscated by the former Sandinista government.
NEWS
March 6, 1990 | Times Staff Writer
Bush Administration officials met Monday with advisers to Nicaraguan President-elect Violeta Barrios de Chamorro and said afterward that they plan to propose hundreds of millions of dollars in U.S. aid for Nicaragua even before Chamorro is inaugurated April 25. Both American and Nicaraguan officials who participated in the talks declined to divulge the amount under discussion.
NEWS
April 19, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
President Daniel Ortega said Wednesday that he will hand over power to President-elect Violeta Barrios de Chamorro on the scheduled April 25 inauguration date, ending speculation that he would delay the transition if the U.S.-backed Contras were not disarmed. "On April 25, I will hand the presidential sash to Violeta Barrios de Chamorro and she will become the chief executive, independent of whether the war continues in our country or has been eradicated," Ortega told reporters.
NEWS
May 13, 1990 | United Press International
Striking public workers threatened Saturday to extend their walkout nationwide, aggravating the first major crisis of President Violeta Barrios de Chamorro's 2 1/2-week-old government. Workers from a union representing about 40,000 government employees, mostly supporters of the opposition Sandinista National Liberation Front, had walked off the job Thursday to press demands for a 200% wage increase and the reinstatement of the civil service law that protects public workers.
NEWS
April 16, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
President Violeta Barrios de Chamorro of Nicaragua said Monday she is cautiously optimistic that a group of friendly nations will help her war-torn country with a series of loans and grants. She made the remarks after a meeting with Secretary of State James A. Baker III on the first day of a three-day Washington visit aimed at seeking financial support for Nicaragua and cementing ties with the United States.
NEWS
August 27, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Perhaps it is most telling that Nicaragua's hostage crisis was resolved while President Violeta Barrios de Chamorro was out of the country. By the time it was over, her government had essentially ceded a portion of national territory to one band of kidnaping gunmen and allowed another--weapons in hand--to travel in a raucous caravan to the airport for a flight to the destination of its choice.
NEWS
October 11, 1992 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In President Violeta Barrios de Chamorro's Nicaragua, everything has changed and nothing has changed. Or does it just seem that way? Toyotas outnumber Russian-made Ladas now, but they still have to steer around horse-drawn carts--about 70% of Nicaraguans live in poverty. The mayor of Managua has put up road signs to the country club and airport. But many streets remain nameless, and Managuans' memories are still dotted with landmarks that no longer exist. Nicaragua remains a polarized country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1991 | PATT MORRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nicaraguan President Violeta Barrios de Chamorro, elected just over a year ago on the heels of a debilitating civil war, on Thursday asked U.S. companies to consider doing business with Nicaragua. She assured potential investors that she knows "it is absolutely necessary that peace and democracy exist" before businesses would be willing to take a chance on her country.
NEWS
April 18, 1991 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush pledged Wednesday to help Nicaragua meet its overdue loan payments and establish normal economic relations with international financial institutions. "One way or another, we will do it," Bush told Nicaraguan President Violeta Barrios de Chamorro during a White House meeting. She responded: "I will sleep better tonight because of that commitment."
NEWS
April 17, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nicaraguan President Violeta Barrios de Chamorro declared her country free of "the delirium of a totalitarian ideology" Tuesday but pleaded with Congress for at least 10 years of financial aid to save the nation from economic disaster after a long and bloody civil war.
NEWS
April 16, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
President Violeta Barrios de Chamorro of Nicaragua said Monday she is cautiously optimistic that a group of friendly nations will help her war-torn country with a series of loans and grants. She made the remarks after a meeting with Secretary of State James A. Baker III on the first day of a three-day Washington visit aimed at seeking financial support for Nicaragua and cementing ties with the United States.
NEWS
February 27, 1990
Violeta Barrios de Chamorro, 60, surprise winner of Nicaraguan election, emerged into politics from the shadow of her assassinated husband, a Nicaraguan hero . . . she was born Oct. 18, 1929, to wealthy landowners in Rivas, a small town near border with Costa Rica . . . married Pedro Joaquin Chamorro in 1950 and loyally supported him during years of jailing and exile under dictatorship of Somoza family . . .
NEWS
September 16, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Bush Administration, retreating under congressional pressure, abandoned on Friday its idea of helping to finance the presidential election campaign of Nicaraguan opposition leader Violeta Barrios de Chamorro through a U.S.-financed private organization.
NEWS
April 15, 1991 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Dagoberto Perez landed a job sketching performance charts for the new Sandinista government's Construction Ministry in 1980, most of the lines he drew pointed upward. Soon came the Contra war and the hard times, but on his $200-a-month salary, Perez still managed to buy a truck while supporting his growing family in a squatter shack.
NEWS
February 20, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
German Chancellor Helmut Kohl pledged substantial development aid to Nicaragua after talks with President Violeta Barrios de Chamorro in Bonn, but the amount was not announced. Bonn sources said Chamorro will also discuss the $500 million that Nicaragua owes to the former East Germany and a large amount of Nicaraguan property that was sold to East Germany after being confiscated by the former Sandinista government.
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