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ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2005 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
AT least in English, it's hard to find a bad review of Violeta Urmana, currently the recipient of raves for her passionate performance in the title role of Los Angeles Opera's "Tosca," which will conclude its run Thursday and next Sunday at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. True, a few quibbles turn up. David Mermelstein, assessing the production for the Los Angeles Daily News, found Urmana's voice acceptable but her performance lacking in "flair and magnetism."
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2005 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
AT least in English, it's hard to find a bad review of Violeta Urmana, currently the recipient of raves for her passionate performance in the title role of Los Angeles Opera's "Tosca," which will conclude its run Thursday and next Sunday at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. True, a few quibbles turn up. David Mermelstein, assessing the production for the Los Angeles Daily News, found Urmana's voice acceptable but her performance lacking in "flair and magnetism."
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2005 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
Making one of those debuts people are likely to be talking about for a long time, Violeta Urmana triumphed as Tosca in the Los Angeles Opera revival of Puccini's opera Saturday at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. The Lithuanian soprano began life as a mezzo, singing Verdi's Princess Eboli at the Metropolitan Opera as recently as 2004, although she made her soprano debut as Maddalena in Giordano's "Andrea Chenier" at the Vienna State Opera in 2003.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2005 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
Making one of those debuts people are likely to be talking about for a long time, Violeta Urmana triumphed as Tosca in the Los Angeles Opera revival of Puccini's opera Saturday at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. The Lithuanian soprano began life as a mezzo, singing Verdi's Princess Eboli at the Metropolitan Opera as recently as 2004, although she made her soprano debut as Maddalena in Giordano's "Andrea Chenier" at the Vienna State Opera in 2003.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Franco Zeffirelli was cheered and showered with roses on the opening night of his new production of Verdi's "Aida" at La Scala on Thursday night in Milan, Italy, making his triumphant return after a 14-year absence from the opera house where he first made his mark.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2003 | Josef Woodard; Chris Pasles; Richard S. Ginell; Daniel Cariaga
Mozart: Symphonies 39 and 41 Orchestra of St. Luke's; Donald Runnicles, conductor (St. Luke's Collection) *** In an auspicious debut for its new in-house label, the esteemed Orchestra of St. Luke's shows what it can do, and how much it knows, about these late Mozart repertory standards, Symphonies 39 and 41. That the orchestra's members have had considerable experience in the more intimate confines of chamber music helps in the process of bringing Mozart to life in a fleet and lucid form.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2005 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
Marcello Viotti, music director of Venice's La Fenice Theatre, died Wednesday in a hospital in Munich, Germany. He was 50. His brother, Silvio Viotti, announced his death. The Italian conductor, who also appeared at La Scala in Milan, the Metropolitan Opera in New York and other major international opera houses, had a stroke last week during a rehearsal of Jules Massenet's "Manon" with the Munich Radio Orchestra. Viotti fell into a coma and never regained consciousness.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2001 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Dusted by snow flurries Sunday afternoon, Walter Cronkite stood in the front of the stage door of Carnegie Hall speaking to a television camera. He was on his way to hear Pierre Boulez conduct the Vienna Philharmonic in Mahler's Third Symphony. His remarks couldn't be overheard, but perhaps he was asked to comment on what promised to be a bizarre musico-climatological phenomenon.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1999 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
The Holy Grail--so miraculously made musical in Wagner's last opera, "Parsifal"--can serve as a symbol of truth and beauty for all of us; and that is something we ever more urgently need as we approach the millennium. At least that's the message in the script that Placido Domingo reads, with beguiling sincerity, at the end of Tony Palmer's "Parsifal: The Search for the Grail," tonight at 8 on KCET.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2005 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
THE opera, it is said, isn't over until the fat lady sings -- or, when it comes to one of the most famous, until the fictional diva Floria Tosca flings herself from a parapet of Rome's Castello Sant'Angelo in the mother of all suicide leaps. That opera is, of course, Giacomo Puccini's "Tosca," which premiered in 1900 and, in a coincidence of scheduling, is being mounted this month by both Opera Pacific and the Los Angeles Opera.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2005 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
In his list of works, Stravinsky's short fairy-tale opera, "The Nightingale" ("Le Rossignol"), follows almost directly on the heels of his great string of early Russian ballets. With "The Firebird," "Petrushka" and "The Rite of Spring" already to his credit, "The Nightingale" had the potential to be Stravinsky's "Nutcracker," one of his most popular works. Instead, this operatic evocation of a songbird in ancient China is the composer's ugly duckling, seldom performed and little recorded.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2003 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
By enlarging our view of the world through working with gestures and shapes, Pierre Boulez and Frank Gehry have, to a remarkable extent, made modern music and architecture unthinkable without them.
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