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ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2013
The violin of the Titanic bandleader, who played as he and bandmates went down with the ship, has been recovered, according to a British auction house. The instrument bears a message from the musician's sweetheart. "For Wallace, on the occasion of our engagement. From Maria. " Like the 1997 James Cameron movie, that story might spur a few tears. As the Agence France-Presse reports, auction house Henry Aldridge & Son says it has confirmed the violin is that of Wallace Hartley.
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SCIENCE
April 7, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
What makes old violins crafted by members of the Stradivari family so much better than violins produced today? Nothing, according to a new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. In a musical version of the classic Coke versus Pepsi taste tests, scientists teamed up with experts who make, play and sell violins to see whether there's any substance to the widespread belief that old violins are superior to newer models. Just as with soda, the researchers discovered that highly accomplished violin soloists couldn't tell the difference between old and new instruments.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2013 | By David Ng
The strange case of a stolen Stradivarius violin belonging to London-based musician Min-Jin Kym has taken another twist. The instrument that officials recovered this year in Bulgaria has turned out to be a replica, not the 17th century instrument that they were looking for, according to reports. British authorities said this week they believe the recovered violin is a replica used for training, and that it was made no more than 100 years ago, according to reports from the BBC News and the Telegraph.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2014 | By Karen Wada
The violins of Antonio Stradivari are revered for being not only superb instruments but works of art. "They combine this magical quality of sound with spectacular craftsmanship," says Margaret Batjer, concertmaster of the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra. Each of these wooden wonders also possesses an individual, inner beauty, what she calls "their own magnificent souls. " LACO hopes to help audiences experience the soul of Stradivari by providing the rare chance to hear eight of the Italian master's creations in a variety of settings.
NATIONAL
February 6, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
Over the centuries, Stradivarius has become the standard for the best in stringed instruments. With the recovery of a stolen 300-year-old Strad violin, a Milwaukee musician will once again be able to make sweet music. The instrument, known as the Lipinski Strad after a famed Polish virtuoso who owned it in the 19th century, was stolen Jan. 27 during the armed robbery of Frank Almond, the concertmaster for the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra. Almond had just finished a concert when he was attacked by someone who used a stun gun and who seized the instrument, worth an estimated $5 million.
NATIONAL
September 12, 2012 | By John M. Glionna
All 11-year-old Camille Cruz wanted to do was play in her sixth-grade orchestra class at a Farmington, N.M., middle school using a violin her grandmother bought her. This instrument is definitely different: Not only does it have sentimental value, it's purple -- and that was where school officials drew the line. They insisted Camille had to play a violin the same color as everyone else's, or she couldn't play at all. The student's violin of a different color now has the town of Farmington (pop.
MAGAZINE
March 5, 2006
Carla Shapreau's story on the Alcantara Stradivarius violin was spellbinding ("Lost and Found. And Lost Again?" Feb. 12). I savored every word of her artfully written, passionate recollection of her part in returning the Stradivarius to UCLA. Sadly, at the end of Shapreau's story, the ugly head of greed showed its face in the form of UCLA's contemplated sale of the violin. To sell it would be a betrayal of the generous gift of Genevieve Vedder to UCLA. It is apparent that her gift was a gift to the future of music, a gift to students and ordinary people to be administered by a trusted institution of learning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2010 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
Jose Maria Carabajal was toiling for the friars at Mission San Antonio on California's Central Coast when he first heard the exalted strains of a violin. His people — the Salinan Indians — had been making music for thousands of years, but he'd never heard anything like the sounds soaring from the priest's polished chunk of wood and gut. Intrigued, Carabajal decided to make his own. The instrument he crafted in 1798 from bay laurel and other native woods was solid enough to last more than two centuries and sweet enough to build a reputation of its own. The Carabajal, as it came to be known, was handed down through generations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Eugene Fodor, a swashbuckling violin virtuoso who was a media darling of classical music in the 1970s but whose substance abuse fractured a fairytale career, has died. He was 60. Fodor died of liver disease Feb. 26 at his home in Arlington, Va., said his wife, Susan Davis. He had struggled with addictions to alcohol, cocaine and heroin, she said. At 24, Fodor became the first American to win top honors on violin at the International Tchaikovsky Competition in 1974.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Music Critic
I predict a hot summer. And, thanks to ECM, which has just released the first international major label recording of Morton Feldman's Violin and Orchestra -- the most impressive, and startlingly least known, of all major American violin concertos -- we have a new aural sunscreen that is dry, clean, clear and with an SPF number in the stratosphere. A study in stillness and stirring, the score is a brilliant companion to a warm day. I've already used this mysteriously alluring labyrinth of strange sounds as a stimulating alert to dawn, as dazed transport during mid-day sun and as an evening's big event.
HEALTH
March 7, 2014 | By Jessica Ogilvie
Christine Wu appeared in one of the year's most viral videos thus far: Billy Ray Cyrus' hip-hop remix of "Achy Breaky Heart. " She played the electric violin - while doing a backbend. Wu, who lives in Santa Monica, is breaking new ground in the performing arts by combining dance, yoga and complicated choreography with the violin. Wu recently talked about how she trains, how movement fuels her creativity and how she's carved out her niche career. You do yoga and ballet as well as working out at the Venice Beach gym. How does your exercise regimen help with the physicality of playing the violin?
NATIONAL
February 6, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
Over the centuries, Stradivarius has become the standard for the best in stringed instruments. With the recovery of a stolen 300-year-old Strad violin, a Milwaukee musician will once again be able to make sweet music. The instrument, known as the Lipinski Strad after a famed Polish virtuoso who owned it in the 19th century, was stolen Jan. 27 during the armed robbery of Frank Almond, the concertmaster for the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra. Almond had just finished a concert when he was attacked by someone who used a stun gun and who seized the instrument, worth an estimated $5 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2014 | By David Ng
A 300-year-old Stradivarius violin that was stolen last month from the concertmaster of the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra has been recovered by authorities, according to a Thursday report from the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. [Updated: Milwaukee police confirmed the recovery of the violin on Thursday.] Milwaukee police said Wednesday that three suspects -- two men, ages 42 and 36, and a woman, 32 -- were arrested in connection with the crime and remained in police custody. The violin -- which is valued at $5 million -- was taken from Milwaukee Symphony concertmaster Frank Almond during an armed robbery on Jan. 27. Robbers used a stun gun on the violinist after a concert at Wisconsin Lutheran College in suburban Milwaukee, according to reports.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
We have a vague notion of a Scandinavian sound as a kind of misty, mysterious Nordic noir. Strangeness is a giveaway. One musical thing might ultimately lead to another, but the landscape is alien. Trying to define an overall Baltic sound, on the other hand, is hopeless, given the variety of regions that border the Baltic Sea. The Los Angeles Philharmonic's program this past weekend touched on the four great northern Baltic coastal cities - Copenhagen, Stockholm, Helsinki and St. Petersburg.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2013 | By David Ng
A violin that was played by a musician on the Titanic as the ship sank in 1912 has been sold at auction for more than $1.7 million, more than triple expectations. The instrument sold at a Saturday auction in Britain for £1.1 million, or about $1.78 million. It had been estimated that the selling price would be between £200,000 and £300,000. Henry Aldridge and Son, the British auction house that specializes in Titanic-related memorabilia and that held the auction, said the instrument was discovered in 2006, and was played by second-class passenger Wallace Hartley, who was one of hundreds who perished on the tragic night of April 14, 1912.
WORLD
October 19, 2013 | By Henry Chu, This post has been corrected. See note at the bottom for details.
LONDON -- The violin believed to have belonged to the bandleader on the Titanic fetched nearly $1.45 million at auction Saturday, becoming far and away the most expensive piece of memorabilia associated with the ocean liner ever to be sold. The British auction house Henry Aldridge & Son had originally expected the battered-looking instrument to sell for a third of that amount. But the legend surrounding the fiddle, its embodiment of the heroic self-sacrifice of a band that famously kept playing as the ill-fated ship met its watery doom, boosted bidding to stratospheric levels.
WORLD
October 19, 2013 | By Henry Chu, This post has been corrected. See note at the bottom for details.
LONDON -- The violin believed to have belonged to the bandleader on the Titanic fetched nearly $1.45 million at auction Saturday, becoming far and away the most expensive piece of memorabilia associated with the ocean liner ever to be sold. The British auction house Henry Aldridge & Son had originally expected the battered-looking instrument to sell for a third of that amount. But the legend surrounding the fiddle, its embodiment of the heroic self-sacrifice of a band that famously kept playing as the ill-fated ship met its watery doom, boosted bidding to stratospheric levels.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2008 | From Reuters
A Russian businessman paid a record price Wednesday for an 18th century violin that had not been played in public for more than 70 years. Maxim Viktorov, who bought the instrument by master violin maker Giuseppe Guarneri, paid "well in excess" of the previous world auction record for a musical instrument of $3.54 million, auction house Sotheby's said. It said Viktorov bought the violin privately, and did not disclose the price. Viktorov promised that the instrument, dating from 1741 and at one stage owned for 15 years by Belgian composer Henri Vieuxtemps, would now be played regularly in public.
WORLD
October 17, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON - It's probably a myth that he played the hymn “Nearer, My God, to Thee” as the great ship sank, but the battered, seawater-damaged violin believed to have belonged to the bandleader on the Titanic is to go on auction this weekend. The instrument is likely to fetch the highest amount ever for a piece of Titanic memorabilia - up to nearly half a million dollars, the English auction house Henry Aldridge & Son said Thursday. For many devotees of the Titanic and of the movies it spawned, the story of the orchestra continuing to play to comfort or distract terrified passengers remains an emotional touchstone, the epitome of courage, calm and defiance in the face of impending doom.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 2013 | By Lee Romney
SAN FRANCISCO - Kim Knoble's past tracks an arc of promise, mental illness and descent into what her parents call "living hell. " But Knoble is not homeless, in prison or dead - outcomes common with stories like hers. Instead, on Wednesday, the woman with a head of wild red curls plans to walk into the St. Francis Yacht Club, tell her tale of recovery and lift the instrument she did not touch for a decade to play Massenet's "Meditation From Thais. " Now 31, Knoble was mastering Mozart violin concertos by the time she hit middle school.
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