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Violin Concerto

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November 29, 2012 | By David Ng
Osvaldo Golijov is one of the most in-demand composers working today, with commissions from major orchestras around the world. But the past few years have been difficult for the Argentine composer: He has missed deadlines for new pieces and was accused earlier this year of plagiarism. On Thursday, Golijov whiffed again with the announcement that his new violin concerto -- already delayed -- will not be ready for its scheduled performances in January. The piece had been scheduled to be performed by the Philadelphia Orchestra, with violinist Leonidas Kavakos, in concerts in Philadelphia and Carnegie Hall.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2014 | By David Ng
Esa-Pekka Salonen, the former music director of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, has won the prestigious Michael Ludwig Nemmers Prize in Music Composition, a biennial award from Northwestern University that honors a contemporary composer's body of work. Salonen is receiving a $100,000 cash award and will have one of his works performed by the Chicago Symphony Orchestra in the 2015-16 season, the university announced Monday. The Finnish composer-conductor also will partner with Northwestern's Henry and Leigh Bienen School of Music, where he will participate in four residencies on the Northwestern campus in the next two academic years.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1991 | HERBERT GLASS, Herbert Glass is a regular contributor to The Times.
Alban Berg's elegiac 1936 Violin Concerto, his last completed work, is a unique combination of serial severity and swooning lyricism--music that tends to rub listeners of both the Modernist and Romantic persuasions the wrong way.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
We have a vague notion of a Scandinavian sound as a kind of misty, mysterious Nordic noir. Strangeness is a giveaway. One musical thing might ultimately lead to another, but the landscape is alien. Trying to define an overall Baltic sound, on the other hand, is hopeless, given the variety of regions that border the Baltic Sea. The Los Angeles Philharmonic's program this past weekend touched on the four great northern Baltic coastal cities - Copenhagen, Stockholm, Helsinki and St. Petersburg.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2002 | Chris Pasles; Daniel Cariaga; Mark Swed; Richard S. Ginell; Josef Woodard
Are we in a golden age of violinists? It looks like it. That astonishing young players keep coming up the ranks and capturing the public's imagination is nothing new. But what really seems to mark our time as special is that so many of these young players continue to grow and to keep their hold on the public as they move through their 20s, 30s and 40s. Record companies have noted this and, despite cutbacks elsewhere, support violinists in expensive concerto recordings of standard repertory.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1997 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
The notion of glances as arrows that pierce bodies and souls is something that the Mexican poet Octavio Paztells us in his recent book, "In the Light of India," is a universal metaphor in poetry. "Admire the art of the archer," as an anonymous poet in India once wrote. "He never touches the body and breaks the heart."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2000 | RICHARD S. GINELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A look at the repertory that Allen Robert Gross has brought to the Santa Monica Symphony Orchestra in his nine seasons as music director is quite revealing. Though Beethoven and Mozart are far and away the most heavily represented composers, some rather difficult, new and obscure items turn up frequently, giving this semipro orchestra (about 75% of which consists of volunteer musicians) chances to stretch itself.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1998 | John Henken
Listening to these suave readings, it is hard to believe that these concertos were ever considered difficult for either fiddlers or public. This is almost a case of playing that is too good to be true to the character of the music. Midori is refined and technically immaculate and Abbado and his Berliners are patrician in support--the resources of this team are truly awesome and everywhere evident.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1992 | JANICE ARKATOV
In many ways, Sarah Chang is a typical 11-year-old. She plays Nintendo with her brother, swims, goes in-line skating (to the horror of her parents), watches TV and shops "a lot" with her friends. She's also a virtuoso violinist. On Tuesday, she'll appear at the Hollywood Bowl with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, playing Tchaikovsky's violin concerto in D major.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2014 | By David Ng
Conductor Christoph Eschenbach and violinist Christian Tetzlaff have canceled their joint appearances scheduled for this weekend at Walt Disney Concert Hall.  The three concerts, which are still scheduled to take place Friday through Sunday, instead will feature conductor Edo de Waart and violinist Augustin Hadelich. The Los Angeles Philharmonic had originally been scheduled to perform Schoenberg's Violin Concerto as part of the program. The piece has been scratched and will be replaced with Beethoven's Violin Concerto.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
"The Rite of Spring," having reached the 100th celebratory anniversary of its clamorous Paris premiere this spring, is the new "Four Seasons. " Igor Stravinsky's ballet score has become ubiquitous. Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos conducted the Los Angeles Philharmonic at the Hollywood Bowl on Tuesday night in what might have seemed like yet another "Rite. " But it wasn't. The Spanish conductor produced a sizzling riot of instrumental color that properly and excitingly reminded us of what all the fuss is about.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2013 | By Joe Banno
When a rarely heard classical work finds its way onto a concert program, it often can leave listeners feeling as if they've encountered an unfairly forgotten masterpiece.  In the case of Alexander Glazunov's Violin Concerto, which the Los Angeles Philharmonic performed at the Hollywood Bowl on Thursday under Bramwell Tovey's baton, with L.A. Phil concertmaster Martin Chalifour as soloist, the neglect seems perhaps more understandable.  ...
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2013 | By David Ng
A valuable Scarampella violin is at the center a brewing legal dispute involving a musician with the Dallas Symphony Orchestra.  Filip Fenrych, a Polish-born violinist with the orchestra, claims that he doesn't owe $43,000 to a woman who authenticated a Scarampella violin after she sold it to him, without authentication, for a reduced price. The case was reported by Courthouse News. Fenrych is arguing that Tara Moore of Mesquite, Texas, asked for $90,000 for the violin that bore a Scarampella label, but wasn't authenticated.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
"Focus on Eötvös," as the Los Angeles Philharmonic titled its concerts last week, wasn't exactly a festival. The focus was, in fact, tight. Only two works by the Hungarian composer were played at Walt Disney Concert Hall, although they were significant. The opera, "Angels in America," was presented at the Green Umbrella concert on Tuesday. The world premiere of a violin concerto commissioned by the orchestra for Midori was the centerpiece of the L.A. Phil's weekend subscription series.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2012
LACMA body set to quit Diana Gutman, chairwoman of the Art Museum Council at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, reports that her 40-member board has voted unanimously to stop volunteering at the museum next year because of its plans to nearly triple council members' fees. As the museum announced this week, members who once paid a minimum of $400 to participate on various councils (or $450 for this particular council) will be required to pay $1,000 plus a $250 membership fee starting next June.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1997 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
During this 200th birthday anniversary of Franz Schubert, the wonderful Third Symphony is hardly about to be forgotten. Yet the clean, lithe and fluent performance achieved by the Mozart Camerata orchestra of Orange County, closing the ensemble's 11th season, still seemed special. Conducted with both mellowness and urgency by Ami Porat, the Third reiterated all its charms at the orchestra's performance Sunday in St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2009 | Rick Schultz
A remarkable run of major monuments in the classical-Romantic violin repertoire began in L.A. a few weeks ago when Joshua Bell played Bruch's First Concerto. It signaled the start of what amounts to a crash course in the history of the 19th century violin concerto at the Hollywood Bowl (with a 20th century American classic thrown in). On Thursday, Marin Alsop, music director of the Baltimore Symphony, conducts Gil Shaham in the Beethoven Violin Concerto with the Los Angeles Philharmonic.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2012 | By David Ng
Osvaldo Golijov is one of the most in-demand composers working today, with commissions from major orchestras around the world. But the past few years have been difficult for the Argentine composer: He has missed deadlines for new pieces and was accused earlier this year of plagiarism. On Thursday, Golijov whiffed again with the announcement that his new violin concerto -- already delayed -- will not be ready for its scheduled performances in January. The piece had been scheduled to be performed by the Philadelphia Orchestra, with violinist Leonidas Kavakos, in concerts in Philadelphia and Carnegie Hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2012 | By Mark Swed, Music Critic
Vasily Petrenko is a slender, stylish Russian conductor dashing enough for Hollywood - he could have easily have pranced on camera in “Anna Karenina.” As an unknown 30-year-old in 2006, he took over the struggling Royal Liverpool Philharmonic, not a glamorous post. Now he is a local hero who has made Merseyside into Shostakovich central. Unfortunately, Petrenko has become associated with a limited Russian repertory, something not about to stop, what with the deserved popularity of his growing Rachmaninoff and Shostakovich discographies.
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