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NEWS
September 17, 2010
In 2004, the popular arthritis pain-reliever Vioxx was taken off the market because the drug unexpectedly increased the risk of heart attacks and strokes. Now researchers think they know what accounted for that risk and, perhaps, a way to get around it to create an effective, safer medication. Using mice, the researchers found that Vioxx caused a big jump in a substance -- a fat -- that could contribute to heart attacks and strokes. The substance, called 20-hydroxyeicosatetrasanoic acid, or 20-HETE, which can constrict blood vessels in the heart and brain and increased blood clotting.
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BUSINESS
December 13, 2013 | By Ken Bensinger
A day after opening talks to resolve hundreds of sudden-acceleration cases in federal and state court in California, Toyota Motor Corp. has settled a separate lawsuit, filed in West Virginia. On Friday, the Japanese automaker reached a confidential agreement with Opal Gay Vance, whose 2010 Camry accelerated and crashed into a trailer and injured her back and neck, her attorney said. The case had been scheduled to go to trial on Jan. 21, making it the next sudden-acceleration case Toyota was expected to face anywhere in the country.
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BUSINESS
March 26, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
People who believe their heart attacks or strokes were caused by the once-popular painkiller Vioxx now have another month to file paperwork to back up their claims under a settlement with manufacturer Merck & Co. Doug Marvin, an outside attorney for Merck, told U.S. District Judge Eldon Fallon that claims were coming in every day to the Richmond, Va., law firm appointed to administer them, BrownGreer. He said some law firms were still working on their claims. Marvin said Merck agreed to delay the deadline to May 1.
NEWS
September 17, 2010
In 2004, the popular arthritis pain-reliever Vioxx was taken off the market because the drug unexpectedly increased the risk of heart attacks and strokes. Now researchers think they know what accounted for that risk and, perhaps, a way to get around it to create an effective, safer medication. Using mice, the researchers found that Vioxx caused a big jump in a substance -- a fat -- that could contribute to heart attacks and strokes. The substance, called 20-hydroxyeicosatetrasanoic acid, or 20-HETE, which can constrict blood vessels in the heart and brain and increased blood clotting.
BUSINESS
May 15, 2008 | From the Associated Press
A Texas appeals court Wednesday overturned a multimillion-dollar verdict against Merck & Co. in one of the few trials it lost over its withdrawn painkiller Vioxx. A jury in Rio Grande City in April 2006 had awarded $32 million to the widow of 71-year-old Leonel Garza, a Vioxx user who died of a heart attack in 2001. That award -- $7 million for compensatory damages and $25 million for punitive damages -- later was cut to about $7.75 million under a Texas law limiting damages. On Wednesday, a three-judge panel of the Texas 4th Court of Appeals overturned the verdict, ruling in favor of Merck.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2005
Regarding "Jury Trial Begins in Texas Vioxx Case" (July 15): What a colossal waste of time and money. There are no magic pills. These folks were not in good health to begin with. Vioxx gave them an opportunity to improve their quality of life at the risk of a shorter life than what they may have had without it. To now sue the manufacturer is absurd. All medications have known and unknown side effects. Consumers want quick and easy fixes for what ails them, and when the drug manufacturers produce them, they get hit with lawsuits by consumers who expect the medical profession to play God. Next time you pay an arm and a leg for your prescription, remember the lawsuits.
BUSINESS
January 31, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Merck & Co., the third-largest U.S. pharmaceutical company, won a lawsuit against its Vioxx painkiller after a state judge in New Jersey said a Texas man failed to prove that the drug caused his stomach pain and internal bleeding. Superior Court Judge Carol E. Higbee in Atlantic City granted a motion for summary judgment to Merck, saying the plaintiff, Edgar Lee Boyd, was unable to show that he was hurt by Vioxx or by the company's alleged failure to warn of the drug's side effects.
OPINION
December 22, 2004
The front-page article about Celebrex and heart risk (Dec. 18) does not qualify as responsible journalism. The only patients for whom the drugs Vioxx and Celebrex (Cox-2 inhibitors) have been found to increase the risk of heart disease are those who have had heart bypass surgery or those with high risk of developing heart disease (those with angina and diabetes). Blanketing the Cox-2 inhibitors to be detrimental is tantamount to misinformation to the public and increasing the panic level.
BUSINESS
May 27, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
The U.S. Supreme Court will decide whether shareholders can sue Merck & Co. over whether the drug maker provided adequate information about the risks of its former blockbuster painkiller Vioxx before the drug was pulled from the market. The high court agreed to review Merck's challenge to a federal appeals court's reinstatement of a class-action securities lawsuit.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2008 | From the Associated Press
More than 44,000 people have signed up for shares of a $4.85-billion settlement over the withdrawn painkiller Vioxx, a sign that the deal is on track, Merck & Co. said Monday. Of about 47,000 people who registered for the settlement earlier this year, more than 44,000 have submitted all or some of the paperwork necessary for enrollment in the deal, Merck said. People who enrolled in the settlement by Friday could be eligible to receive an interim payment this year. Whitehouse Station, N.J.-based Merck has said it would withdraw from the agreement unless at least 85% of people in different groups of claimants joined in the settlement.
SCIENCE
November 24, 2009 | By Shari Roan
The significant cardiovascular risks linked to Vioxx could have been identified nearly four years before the anti-inflammatory medication was taken off the market, a new study has concluded, but consumers and physicians didn't have access to such information at the time. "We need comprehensive, transparent, independent access to clinical-trial data in order to do a much better job of making this information available to the public," said the study's lead author, Dr. Joseph S. Ross, an assistant professor of geriatrics and palliative medicine at New York's Mount Sinai School of Medicine.
BUSINESS
May 27, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
The U.S. Supreme Court will decide whether shareholders can sue Merck & Co. over whether the drug maker provided adequate information about the risks of its former blockbuster painkiller Vioxx before the drug was pulled from the market. The high court agreed to review Merck's challenge to a federal appeals court's reinstatement of a class-action securities lawsuit.
BUSINESS
May 30, 2008 | Jeffrey Gold, The Associated Press
Appeals courts in two states scrapped verdicts Thursday against Merck & Co. stemming from some of the earliest trials involving its once popular painkiller Vioxx. A Texas court reversed a $26-million verdict against the drug maker stemming from the first trial. The court found no evidence that Robert Ernst suffered a fatal heart problem from a blood clot triggered by Vioxx. Ernst had been taking the now-withdrawn drug for eight months before being stricken in May 2001. His widow had won a $253- million verdict against Whitehouse Station, N.J.-based Merck in 2005, but Texas punitive damage caps later cut that to about $26 million.
BUSINESS
May 21, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Merck & Co. has agreed to pay $58 million as part of a multistate settlement of allegations that its ads for the once-popular painkiller Vioxx deceptively played down the health risks. The agreement announced Tuesday also called for Merck to submit all new TV commercials for its drugs to the Food and Drug Administration for review before they can be aired.
BUSINESS
May 15, 2008 | From the Associated Press
A Texas appeals court Wednesday overturned a multimillion-dollar verdict against Merck & Co. in one of the few trials it lost over its withdrawn painkiller Vioxx. A jury in Rio Grande City in April 2006 had awarded $32 million to the widow of 71-year-old Leonel Garza, a Vioxx user who died of a heart attack in 2001. That award -- $7 million for compensatory damages and $25 million for punitive damages -- later was cut to about $7.75 million under a Texas law limiting damages. On Wednesday, a three-judge panel of the Texas 4th Court of Appeals overturned the verdict, ruling in favor of Merck.
BUSINESS
March 26, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
People who believe their heart attacks or strokes were caused by the once-popular painkiller Vioxx now have another month to file paperwork to back up their claims under a settlement with manufacturer Merck & Co. Doug Marvin, an outside attorney for Merck, told U.S. District Judge Eldon Fallon that claims were coming in every day to the Richmond, Va., law firm appointed to administer them, BrownGreer. He said some law firms were still working on their claims. Marvin said Merck agreed to delay the deadline to May 1.
BUSINESS
May 30, 2008 | Jeffrey Gold, The Associated Press
Appeals courts in two states scrapped verdicts Thursday against Merck & Co. stemming from some of the earliest trials involving its once popular painkiller Vioxx. A Texas court reversed a $26-million verdict against the drug maker stemming from the first trial. The court found no evidence that Robert Ernst suffered a fatal heart problem from a blood clot triggered by Vioxx. Ernst had been taking the now-withdrawn drug for eight months before being stricken in May 2001. His widow had won a $253- million verdict against Whitehouse Station, N.J.-based Merck in 2005, but Texas punitive damage caps later cut that to about $26 million.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2008 | From the Associated Press
More than 44,000 people have signed up for shares of a $4.85-billion settlement over the withdrawn painkiller Vioxx, a sign that the deal is on track, Merck & Co. said Monday. Of about 47,000 people who registered for the settlement earlier this year, more than 44,000 have submitted all or some of the paperwork necessary for enrollment in the deal, Merck said. People who enrolled in the settlement by Friday could be eligible to receive an interim payment this year. Whitehouse Station, N.J.-based Merck has said it would withdraw from the agreement unless at least 85% of people in different groups of claimants joined in the settlement.
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